Porsche will setup over 500 fast charging stations across the United States in order to service the fully electric Porsche Mission E sedan.

The 800V fast chargers will be installed at Porsche dealerships and locations that are easy to access from the highway. Installation on the majority of them will be complete by the end of 2019, by which point Porsche will be selling the Mission E (a name that won’t stick for the production car, by the way) from its network of dealerships. The automaker has said the fast charge stations will be able to charge the Mission E’s battery from flat to within 250 miles of range in about 20 minutes. They will likely cost money to use, but Porsche has yet to work out the specifics.

“It’s too early to talk about how exactly that payment process for customers will work,” PorscheNorth America CEO Klaus Zellmer told Automotive News in a recent interview. “There are various opportunities. You could buy a package all included for the car. It could be a membership card that you use. We’re not quite there yet.”

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All Porsche dealers are being asked to install at least one fast charger, along with a buffer pack that stores energy for the charging grid.  Zellmer explained the fast charging stations will be a major investment for dealers, saying it will cost at least six-figures to set a small grid up. It will be to dealerships to decide whether or not to offer free fast charging to customers, or to charge for their use. In addition to dealerships, Porsche is also looking to set up chargers at places their customers may frequent, such as golf courses or hotels.

Porsche is working with third-party companies to set up a broader charging grid away from dealers as well, such as ChargePoint, EVgo and Electrify America. The production Porsche Mission E is expected to debut sometime in early 2019 before going on sale later in the year. Whenever it arrives, expect Porsche to be ready to serve customers with an expansive, working grid of charge points.

[Source: Automotive News]

This article originally appeared on AutoGuide.com