The Vanda Electrics’ Dendrobium has a top speed of around 200 mph, but that’s not all.

Coming from Singapore, the Dendrobium was developed with the help of Williams Advanced Engineering and it shows if the numbers are true. The company says the hypercar is capable of going zero-to-60 mph in just 2.7 seconds while pushing out 1,000 horsepower.

The car was built at Williams’ facility in Grove and serves as a high-performance halo project for Vanda Electrics, meaning it might not even head to production. But if it does, it will be sometime in 2020 and it receives positive feedback at the 2017 Geneva Motor Show where it debuted.

With a striking design, the Dendrobium certainly looks the part of a hypercar, especially with all the doors opened. The synchronized door mechanism was inspired by a genus of orchids native to Singapore, which is where the Dendrobium name comes from.

Although Williams Advanced Engineering was in charge of the powertrain, the design and body was made by Vanda Electrics. It features a composite monocoque chassis, carbon fiber body panels, carbon ceramic brake discs and lightweight calipers housed inside 20-inch front and 21-inch rear wheels wrapped with Michelin tires. Vanda Electrics says the target weight for the Dendrobium was 3,858 pounds (1,750 kilograms).

“Dendrobium is our interpretation and expression of what pushes the boundaries in the development of an electric performance car. We have engaged some expert partners to help us achieve this such as Williams Advanced Engineering,” said Larissa Tan, Vanda Electrics CEO. “With its skills in electrification, aerodynamics, lightweight structures, vehicle dynamics and integration – and even low-volume build – we could not think of a more appropriate partner. We are looking forward to seeing the world’s reaction to Dendrobium. This electric hypercar may just be a concept for now, but we have every intention of putting it into production. It sits at the top of our range and the production version will be a fitting showcase for the best in design and e-technology.”

This article originally appeared at AutoGuide.com