While even longer-range batteries some time away, automakers are working to make today’s batteries easier and quicker to charge.

Tesla first capitalized on the strategy with its Supercharger network. Porsche and Aston Martin are following suit with rapid-charging technology. Now, General Motors is in, too.

Bloomberg reported last Thursday that GM and its partner Delta Americas is working on an ultra-fast charging system that could add 180 miles of driving range in just 10 minutes. The figure is much quicker than a Tesla charging at a Supercharger, which adds 6 miles per minute. Porsche and Aston Martin’s systems will add about 12.4 miles per minute.

Taking GM at its estimate would give the future charging system a figure of 18 miles per minute charged.

SEE ALSO: GM to Boost Production of Chevy Bolt EV by 20 Percent

Delta said the charging stations will deliver up to 400 kilowatts of power, which also exceeds Porsche and its planned 350-kw DC fast charging for the Taycan electric car. Ultimately, the goal is replicate filling a traditional car with gasoline at a fuel pump.

“Everybody would like to replicate what we can do when we’re filling a tank of gasoline,” Sam Abuelsamid, an analyst with Navigant Research said. “This is especially true for people who live in cities. It makes a lot of sense to have an EV in urban areas, but people who live there are least likely to have access to charging.”

GM plans to introduce 20 new electric cars by 2023, though it’s unclear how many of them will make their way to North America. The first two electric cars, the Buick Velite 6 and Baojun E200, are for China only currently. GM CEO Mary Barra wrote in a LinkedIn update that “China is the world’s largest EV market and will be a large driver of global EV adoption.”

[Source: Bloomberg]