A California lawmaker wants to set a date on banning fossil-fuel cars in the state that started car culture.

According to a report from Bloomberg, California Assemblymember Phil Ting is planning to introduce a bill that would start the ban in 2040. In the proposed bill, starting that year, the state department of motor vehicles would only be allowed to register clean vehicles. That means no CO2. So no gas, no diesel, no hybrids. Not even plug-in hybrids. It would be full electric, or clean power like hydrogen fuel cells.

Ting is a Democrat and is chair of the chamber budget committee. He is planning to introduce the bill next month when the new legislative session starts.

California has a target of cutting emissions by 80 percent of 1990 levels by 2050. Cutting vehicle emissions would make great strides toward that goal. Transportation is now the top source of greenhouse gases in the U.S.

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“Until you set a deadline, nothing gets done,” Ting, told Bloomberg. “It’s responsible for us to set a deadline 23 years in advance.”

The topic of a ban has been addressed already by California officials. Governor Jerry Brown has brought up the idea to the California Air Resources Board, the state’s air quality regulator, asking why other countries are doing it, but not California. CARB has long been at the forefront of reducing vehicle emissions, starting with the formation of the agency in 1967.

California is the only state permitted to set its own limits for vehicle emissions, although other states are permitted to use the California regulations. A full ban on fossil fuel vehicles, though, goes beyond the legislative abilities of the board. That’s why Ting is planning legislation in the State Assembly.

In addition to China’s plan to ban fossil fuel vehicles, India, France, the U.K., and Norway have all set targets to ban gas and diesel cars. Some of those countries are targeting a full ban on all fossil fuel cars, but others are looking at just banning the sale of new ones.

Bloomberg