BMW has finally pulled the wraps off of its forward-looking iNext concept.

The iNext shows BMW future vision for its EVs with regards to both design and technology. The automaker says the concept looks to answer the question of “how will we be moving around in the future?” and as such, it’s both electric and autonomous. The concept also explores new avenues with regards to the interior as BMW looks to change the way people spend time in vehicles when they don’t have to be driving them.

Styling wise, the iNext is radical and forward thinking. It features a large, interlinked take on BMW’s kidney grille up front, along with very narrow LED headlamps and a window outline that mimics the shape the reimagined kidney grilles. The long wheelbase, short overhangs and raked shape aim to give it a wedge-like shape that is intended to evoke sportiness, the automaker says. BMW also says the iNext has the same size and proportions of one of its modern-day crossovers.

The cabin was a point of particular focus for BMW, with the automaker looking to make the car interior its customers new “favorite space.” It’s described as a “living space” on wheels with warm brown and beige colors throughout, along with bronze and open pore wood accents inspired by modern furniture. There’s also an onboard AI assistant that can be activated by simply saying “Hey BMW” and what BMW calls ‘Intelligent Materials’ which allow a cloth or wood surface to receive touch inputs. For example, the wood trim on the center console can become a touchpad.

BMW didn’t address the iNext’s pure electric powertrain, but the vehicle comes with two driving modes: a performance oriented ‘Boost’ mode and a relaxed, daily driving ‘Ease’ mode.

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The BMW iNext will go into production as BMW’s so-called “technology flagship” at its Dingolfing in 2021. BMW says the vehicle will be the first to fully implement its new ‘D+ACES’ strategic vision, which stands for ‘Design, Autonomous, Connected, Electrified and Services’.

A version of this story originally appeared on AutoGuide.com.