The Hyundai Kona is just making its name known around North America, but Hyundai is now showing off a new all-electric version of the subcompact crossover at the 2018 New York Auto Show.

Showing off the versatility of the new small car platform, Hyundai has pulled out the internal combustion engine and all the associated plumbing and replaced it with a 64 kWh lithium-ion battery and a 201 horsepower, 291 lb-ft electric motor.

That powertrain will enable the Kona EV to get an estimated range of 250 miles and estimate 117 MPGe, greater than the Nissan Leaf, Tesla Model S and Model X. It can be fully charged in just 54 minutes using a Level 3 charger. To make things easy, the Kona EV will come with standard DC fast charging capability.

2019 Hyundai Kona EV

The Kona arrives with a new grille design that hides the charge port. There’s also a neat cross-hatch look up front along with LED lighting and there are aero-tuned fared fenders. The taillights are also unique, and you’ll also notice the wheels are specially crafted: lightweight for improved efficiency.

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The Kona EV will be available in all of the funky bright colors you can find on the gas-powered Kona, and can also be had with a contrasting white roof, that Hyundai says will reduce the HVAC load on the vehicle, by improving the solar heat rejection.

The interior hasn’t changed in any discernable way meaning that the vehicle comes with Android Auto and Apple Car Play support. It also has wireless phone charging and a head-up display option too. The vehicle is offered with a ton of safety systems and driver assists. There’s standard forward collision warning and available lane keeping assist, high beam assist, and driver attention warning as well as blind spot monitoring and rear cross traffic alert.

Expect the Kona to arrive late this year in California first, and then the other ZEV-focused states in the U.S. market.

2019 Hyundai Kona EV Interior

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This article originally appeared on AutoGuide.com