Tesla Updates Map of Supercharger Sites

Tesla has updated its Supercharger map, with new details on locations under construction and an estimated plan that stretches into 2016.

While the company is right on target for many stations, the map shows that some regions of the U.S. are still deficient for Tesla owners.

Tesla opened the first Supercharger in September of 2012. The 120-kw charging stations give Model S owners (and owners of any future Tesla models) the ability to recharge 80 percent capacity for free in about 20 minutes. Accompanying the Supercharger launch was an announcement on Tesla’s plans to build 100-plus total stations, though some thought that projection was overly ambitious.

Superchargers as of January 28, 2014.

Superchargers as of January 28, 2014.

Tesla has strategically built charging stations around the country for the past two years. Last April, it proved sceptics wrong, with the ribbon-cutting ceremony of the 100th Supercharger station.

Superchargers projected for 2015.

Superchargers projected for 2015.

Currently, there are 151 Superchargers open in North America, with enough coverage to allow travel from coast to coast. Tesla estimates that 80-percent of the U.S. is currently within 100 miles of a Supercharger. Current expansion plans will boost this to 98-percent by the end of this year.

Tesla Supercharger Map: of current locations in January 2015.

Tesla Supercharger Map: of current locations in January 2015.

Tesla is also expanding its Supercharger network overseas, with 123 stations currently built in Europe, 61 in Asia, and new plans to build in Australia.

Despite these accomplishments, some areas of the current map aren’t matching Tesla’s projections. Nebraska, Arkansas, Missouri, Kentucky, and others are completely devoid of public Superchargers statewide. And plans for charging stations along the Mexican border have not materialized (though Tesla hopes to add stations in Arizona, New Mexico and Texas next year).

Anticpated Tesla Supercharger locations for 2015.

Anticpated Tesla Supercharger locations for 2015.

There are no details on the delays at Tesla’s website, but other sources mention issues such as permits that are beyond Tesla’s control. In New Jersey, for example, discussions for charging stations in service areas were suspended last fall while legislators debated over who has the authority to allow them, said NJ.com. This blocked some potential locations, though Tesla later circumvented the snag by working with the Turnpike Authority instead. Locations for two Superchargers have now been approved on New Jersey Turnpikes.

Tesla projects that 98-percent of the U.S. population will be within 100 miles of a Supercharger in 2016.

Tesla projects that 98-percent of the U.S. population will be within 100 miles of a Supercharger in 2016.

For the most up-to-date locations, Tesla’s website offers a user-friendly search for the closest Supercharger, along with other charging stations that are Tesla-compatible.

SEE ALSO: 60-kwh Tesla Model S Past Halfway Mark On Round-Trip Coast-to-Coast Supercharger Trip