Prius Plug-in Hybrid Now Available In Canada

The 2012 Prius Plug-in Hybrid is finally available through Toyota dealerships across Canada.

The plug-in version of Toyota’s popular Prius hatchback is offered at a suggested starting price of $35,700.

Buyers in certain provinces can deduct from this MSRP applicable government incentives of up to $5,092.

As a reference point, the base Prius hatchback starts at $25,995 in Canada.

The Prius Plug-in and its third generation Hybrid Synergy Drive technology – already proven in more than four million vehicles around the globe – was extensively tested in Canada, undergoing more than two years of real-world field trials as part of a global testing program. Feedback from these trials helped Toyota engineers optimize the Prius Plug-in’s driving and ownership experience.

The Prius Plug-in Hybrid features room for five adults and up to 446 liters of luggage space. With a lightweight lithium-ion battery pack, the Prius Plug-in Hybrid is ready to go with a full charge in as little as 90 minutes when connected to a 220 volt dedicated socket or 3 hours when connected to a 110 volt dedicated 15 amp socket – and automatically switches to its full hybrid gasoline-electric system once the electric power is depleted so there’s never any worry about arriving at your destination.

The Prius Plug-in Hybrid comes to Canadians with many standard comfort, convenience and style features, such as: remote air conditioning system with automatic temperature control, heated front seats, display audio with navigation and unique aluminum alloy wheels.

An available Technology Package will further enhance the Prius Plug-in Hybrid with features such as radar cruise control and auto-leveling LED headlamps. The Prius Plug-in Hybrid also benefits from Toyota’s commitment to safety with an extensive suite of active and passive safety systems as standard, including the Star Safety System and seven airbags.


  • anonomous

    what is the mileage

  • Seth D

    The Prius has two advantages against other hybridcars. The technology is reliable and the price is very competitive.

  • Modern Marvel Fan

    The Prius Plugin is really pointless. For the extra price premium, you are better off buying a regular Prius.

    Prius Plugin can NOT stay in EV mode with “NORMAL” daily driving… Higher than 100KMh/62mph, it is gas… floor the car, it is gas.. half way down on the pedal, it is gas…keep up speed on a hill, it is gas….

    What is the point?

    Rebates is the ONLY thing that comes to mind…

  • John D.

    Somewhat cold up there. I wonder if they adjust the mileage listings to factor this in. In cold weather down here, the engine runs longer and the battery has less capacity. Lithium has the same type of de-rate as the temperature drops. Good car, but I hope they are not trying to sell it as something it is not. At least the generation 3 models are better in the snow due to the re-programing.

  • john1701a

    So what if the engine runs? 101 MPG today after 56 miles of driving today, charging overnight at home and later in the afternoon at work.

    85 MPG is my average after 8,587 miles over the past 5.5 months (measured at the pump, using E10 for fuel). That average includes a 600-mille trip up north with bikes on back and several +100 mile drives.

    Living in Minnesota, I’ll soon be able to provide cold-weather data. But having owned a 2010 Prius prior to upgrading to the 2012 plug-in, I can already tell you how beneficial it is being able to tap into the engine for heat while still taking advantage of lots of kWh available from the battery-pack. In short, MPG will still be quite impressive even in the extremes of winter.

  • Modern Marvel Fan

    “So what if the engine runs? 101 MPG today after 56 miles of driving today, charging overnight at home and later in the afternoon at work. “

    You mean the 4.4KWh battery that ONLY powers the car in EV mode if you drives like grandma?

    My point is the premium that you paid to upgrade from a regular Prius Gen III (which is already a very efficient and good car) doesn’t pay for the price difference and electricity cost.

    You are better off buying something like the Volt with a real battery. Volt owners are known to have 200 MPG + and way better performance.

  • john1701a

    “You mean the 4.4KWh battery that ONLY powers the car in EV mode if you drives like grandma?”

    Greenwash. You get 4.4 kWh of electricity benefit regardless of how you drive.

    My morning commute includes 9 miles of driving at 70 mph. Again, so what if the engine runs? I see +100 MPG for each of the 1-minute segments on the consumption-screen while cruising at that speed.

    The benefit comes from the engine running at extremely low RPM (varying between 992 and 1024). That rate consumes very little gas, hence the high efficiency. Having the engine run is a big deal in Canada and the northern states too; it allows the heater to take advantage of hot coolant.

  • Modern Marvel Fan

    “My morning commute includes 9 miles of driving at 70 mph. Again, so what if the engine runs? I see +100 MPG for each of the 1-minute segments on the consumption-screen while cruising at that speed.”

    That is a “baloney” MPG. It is NO different from Volt’s 250mpg+ display…

    “The benefit comes from the engine running at extremely low RPM (varying between 992 and 1024). That rate consumes very little gas, hence the high efficiency. Having the engine run is a big deal in Canada and the northern states too; it allows the heater to take advantage of hot coolant.”

    At 1,000 RPM and 70mph, your 1.8L engine won’t generate enough heat to do anything during the harsh winter in the northern states… Even in Northern California, Prius’s MPG drops fast during cold weather…

    So many silly and unscientific arguement…

  • john1701a

    The greenwashing efforts are tiresome already.

    I so look forward to proving you wrong with lots of real-world data.

    Having got my PHV in mid-March, I only got to experience one storm with several inches of snow…

  • John D.

    The PIH version runs a different program with different tipping points for changeovers between electric and gas, so you can push it more before it changes over.
    My comment about “cold” relates to several things, one being the fact that the battery is rated at 4.4kw at 75 degrees. This capacity drops quite a bit when you dip below 30 degrees, (2.2kw) as all batteries do. (Outside will be different then in a heated garage, at least for the morning commute.)
    The other factor is that in order for the catalytic converter, o2 sensors, and other parts to run correctly, the engine will start and run to maintain those temperatures. (As well as the comfort of the cabin.)
    Bottom line, the car will have a different economic profile in Florida versus Quebec in the winter.
    One does also have to factor in the cost of electricity and the effect of power plants (42% Coal) when looking at the Mpg/Mpe equation.

  • John K.

    Ugh: the back up lights and turn signal lights (at least on the rear of the one I looked at in California), are still stupid bulbs, not LEDs…. So much for “high tech”. Wonder if the interior lights are also stupid bulbs that regularly need replacing?

    If Toyota licenses Wash S U’s tin anode tech, the PiP’s e mileage could go to 45 miles by next June! Wouldn’t that make Ford and GM executives have sleepless nights!

    http://news.wsu.edu/pages/publications.asp?Action=Detail&PublicationID=31776&TypeID=1

  • hesham