Fisker Speaks Silently Through New Web Site

In addition to having some form of marketing presence for cars it is not at the moment producing, between the lines Fisker Automotive could implicitly be saying more, but what it’s really trying to impart is a mystery.

Within the past couple of weeks the Anaheim, Calif.-based company has added pages to its new site even as many observers speak of its pending collapse as a near certainty.

When we last checked April 25, the under-construction site was little more than a mockup, but someone has been at work fleshing it out. It now features some tabs that lead somewhere and on the home page are scrolling images of Karmas.

Their colors happen to be red, white and blue. See any unspoken messages there?

If you scroll your mouse over the “Tomorrow” tab, up pops script saying “Tomorrow never dies.”

Is this a general truism, an act of bravado from a dying corporate entity, or does Fisker know some way out of the fine kettle of fish it is now caught in?

Under the “Tomorrow” tab, Fisker has images of pending models everyone has long since seen – the Atlantic, Sunset, and Surf.

Under the FAQ question “Where is Fisker Automotive’s U.S. plant located?” the company answers:

“After receiving the DoE loan, Fisker made it a priority to create U.S. jobs which led to the purchase its own assembly plant in Delaware where we plan to establish production of our second, higher volume line of vehicles baased [sic] on the Atlantic.”

Some of the pages were not displaying correctly for us either. Maybe it was a fluke, or due to be corrected soon?

If you click on the “Press” tab for media access, the “Contact” page comes up (just as if one had simply clicked on Contact to begin with).

We’ve tried sending inquiries to the linked e-mail address inquiries@fiskerautomotive.com and they’ve been rejected as an undeliverable address. Maybe this will be fixed in coming days?

All we know is Fisker is communicating overt and implicit messages in silence even if it does not otherwise respond to inquiries through back-door channels we’ve also tried.

What it is attempting to actually say in slowly assembling a Web site while bankruptcy documents are written up, yet not filed, is still unclear.