Nissan Leaf Adds 11 New Markets to “No Charge to Charge” Campaign

Nissan has added 11 new markets to its “No Charge to Charge” promotion to make the Leaf even more Tesla-competitive.

Rolling out the No Charge to Charge promotion to 11 new markets brings the total to 38 markets in the U.S. The program offers new LEAF buyers two years of complimentary public charging with the purchase or lease of the all-electric car from participating Leaf-certified dealers. The new cities include Chattanooga, Tenn.; Cincinnati; Cleveland/Akron; Columbia, S.C.; Columbus, Ohio; Detroit; Knoxville, Tenn.; Las Vegas; Pittsburgh; Providence, R.I.; and Reno, Nev.

“We know that public charging is a key element in providing additional range confidence for electric vehicle drivers, and free public charging is a great way to make Nissan Leaf an unrivaled value for the average American driver,” said Brian Maragno, director of Nissan’s electric vehicle sales and marketing.

Nissan’s announcement comes a month after Tesla CEO Elon Musk broke the news during pre-registration hype that the Model 3 will not offer free supercharging with its $35,000 base sticker price. The Model S and Model X do include complimentary use of Tesla’s Supercharger network.

SEE ALSO: What Do We Know About the 2017 Nissan Leaf?

Nissan continues to work hard at competing with Tesla and other plug-in electric vehicle makers. The Leaf’s starting price of $26,700 – after the federal tax credit of $7,500 – and additional cities in No Charge to Charge, make the Leaf more intriguing in the market. Reaching global sales of more than 224,000 has helped Nissan describe the Leaf as the “world’s best-selling electric car.”

Sales figures for the Leaf are not helping Nissan tell a convincing story. In June, the Nissan Leaf had 1,096 units sold in the U.S. That was up 12 percent from May, but down 47.2 percent from June 2015. For the year, sales of the Leaf were down 41 percent versus the first half of 2015.

In comparison to Tesla, Nissan has not been doing well lately. Sales of the Model S and Model X were about double that of the Leaf in June at 2,800 and 2,000, respectively, according to HybridCars’ Dashboard data.