Lexus ES 300h To Be Priced At $38,850

Lexus made it official today: the first ever hybrid ES, known as ES 300h, will have a MSRP of $38,850.

This represents a difference of $2,750 over the ES 350, which carries a base MSRP of $36,100.

The ES 350 and ES 300 hybrid will arrive at dealerships in August. In both cases, the MSRP does not include a delivery, processing and handling fee of $895.

This marks the first time the Lexus ES will be available with Lexus Hybrid Drive. Featuring a 2.5-liter four-cylinder Atkinson cycle engine shared with the Camry Hybrid, the ES 300h is expected to earn EPA fuel economy ratings of approximately 40 mpg city, 39 mpg highway and 40 mpg combined. The ES 300h generates 200 total system horsepower.

The ES 300h feature a Drive Mode selector shared with its ES 350 sibling. Normal mode provides a blend of performance and efficiency that is suited to everyday driving, while Eco mode favors fuel economy. Sport mode increases powertrain and steering responsiveness. The ES 300h adds an EV mode which allows short distance drives, at reduced speed, using only the power from the hybrid battery pack.


  • Al Bunzel

    What the article should also add is that the Lexus & Toyota Hybrids are Full Hybrids which is in my opinion a lot better than a micro hybrid or mild hybrid.
    A Full Hybrid lets you drive in EV only mode for a short while with the gas/diesel motor turned off. The Micro Hybrids and Mild Hybrids have to have the gas/diesel motor on whenever the car is driving.

    More details about the differences between full hybrid, micro hybrid and mild hybrid can be found at http://electriccarconversionblog.com/what-are-the-differences-between-full-hybrids-micro-hybrids-and-mild-hybrids

    The car companies probably don’t want to hear what I’m about to say, but the other reason why I like Full Hybrids better than the micro or mild hybrids is because it should be theoretically possible (if you know the car’s architecture, electronics, computers, wiring etc) to add more batteries, a plug, some wiring, add some bits and if you can modify the car computer(s), you can make it into a plug-in hybrid and drive longer distances (and at highway speeds) in EV mode. (Note: You have to know what you are doing when you do this modification.) I’ve seen kits available for the G2 Prius from http://www.nilco2.com.au
    Hopefully, they will come up with a kit for the Lexus hybrids.

  • Nelson Lu

    Of course, the Lincoln MKZ Hybrid will, in its coming generation, be about 45 MPG combined at about the same price…