June Hybrid Sales Up From a Year Ago

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Hybrid car sales in June were up 9 percent from a year ago and rose 2 percent compared to last month—outperforming the overall new car market that was down 28 percent from June 2008 and off 7 percent from May.

June hybrid sales suggest that hybrids are recovering more quickly than the overall car market—just as they defied the economic downturn several months after overall car sales started to decline in 2008. June marks the sixth consecutive month of higher hybrid sales.

Nationally, car dealers sold 26,205 hybrids in June, the highest one-month total in 13 months. Hybrid car sales numbers exceeded 3 percent of the new car market, and could reflect the beginning of an anticipated long-term trend in which hybrid market share grows by as much as 1 percent every year. Dozens of new hybrid models will be introduced in the next few years. The world’s largest carmakers are significantly investing in increased production capacity for hybrid cars and advanced auto batteries.

The overall market continues to suffer, but declining sales have begun to slow down for four of the six major carmakers. Ford reported the smallest drop of 10.7 percent. Jesse Toprak, executive director of industry analysis for Edmunds.com told Associated Press, “It is unlikely things will get any worse.”

The Toyota Prius led the hybrid pack with 12,998 sales, representing 49.6 percent of all hybrid sales in June. The vast majority of Prius sales—85 percent, according to Toyota—came from the new 2010 model. The introduction of the new Prius apparently affected sales of the 2010 Honda Insight and Honda Civic Hybrid, which declined by 25 percent and 42 percent respectively, compared to last month. Sales of the Ford Fusion Hybrid continued to gain momentum, jumping nearly 10 percent compared to May.

Rising gas prices—from $2.28 per gallon in May to $2.64 last month—may have contributed to an increase in hybrid sales in June.

A full report on June hybrid sales will be posted later this month at the HybridCars.com “Hybrid Market Dashboard.”


  • Jeddy

    I’m not surprised in the accelerated hybrid sales. Having purchased the Prius 2010, I’m ecstatic with it’s performance. I’m getting 4.6L/100km and haven’t fueled yet at 650km. I’m still on the first tank of gas!

    Down the road, I’ll be looking to replace the gas-guzzling Dodge Grand Caravan Sport with a hybrid of better equivalent. I’m wondering where the hybrid RAV4 / hybrid CRV’s are?

    Reducing our dependence on foreign oil is politically, financially, and environmentally the right way to go. I’d love to see hydrogen fuel cells finally get off the ground …

    All in all, a new green revolution seems to have arrived …

  • DJB

    Interesting article.

    Too bad hybrid cars only account for a bit over 3% of new car sales though. I look forward to the day when 3% of new cars sold AREN’T hybrids :)

  • Robcares

    No one would be happier then me to see Hydrogen replace fossil fuels. However, Big oil will be the first supplier of Hydrogen derived from oil. How is that weening us off of oil? I have a question, I’m not a chemist, when you extract H2 from oil, what is left over? will it have a use? or does it become some sort of new pollution nightmare? Also, if you convert a barrel of oil to H2, what is the energy comparison between that and a barrel of oil converted to gas? What is the cost comparison in producing the two fuels? I don’t know the answers to all of these questions, but my intuition tells me, everything about H2 is more costly and less efficient, and that would be a huge problem. Lastly, the ultimate source of H2 would be water. Potable (drinkable) water is scarce world wide, so the obvious solution would be sea water. How much coal do you need to burn in the coal fire power plants across this country, to convert one gallon of sea water into H2? I think, at the end of the day, Ev’s will be more efficient for the majority of drivers. H2 may work in a small segment of the population, but overall, costs for fuels will need to rise dramatically before H2 will be able to compete, and big oil is in complete control of that. Happy Independance Day.

  • perfectapproach

    H2 doesn’t necessarily have to come from crude oil (and I’m sure that it WOULD be very inefficient to do so). H2 can be produced from natural gas and alcohols. If alternative energy plants (nuclear, solar, wind) were use to create hydrogen from water, alcohol, and natural gas, there could be little/no pollutants created. (Even spent nuclear fuel can be recycled into usable nuclear fuel, in some cases). A great side-effect of hydrogen-based cars is that they PRODUCE potable water. I’m sure many years down the line, if/when hydrogen-based transport does become as widespread as a standard ICE is today, the water that is created as exhaust would likely be kept in a tank in the car and drained for use in the home, possibly even for drinking.

    Sounds strange, but remember that when the internal combustion engine was created, gasoline was a waste by-product of fuel-oil production. No one ever imagined that people would one day want to carry around 15 – 30 gallons of this “waste” in a tank to fuel their cars. Just as common as carrying around gasoline in a tank is now, carrying around a waste-tank for water may be commonplace in a future hydrogen economy.

  • Nelson Lu

    Jeddy writes:

    “Down the road, I’ll be looking to replace the gas-guzzling Dodge Grand Caravan Sport with a hybrid of better equivalent. I’m wondering where the hybrid RAV4 / hybrid CRV’s are?”

    The Ford Escape/Mercury Milan/Mazda Tribute hybrids have already been here for a long, long time. Granted, they’re a bit on the small side — but so are the RAV4 and CRV.

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