Hyundai Not Afraid to Lead in Fuel Economy—And Fuel Economy Reporting

“More data is always better,” said Hyundai Motor America’s President and CEO John Krafcik when asked by HybridCars.com about his company’s new practice of issuing monthly fuel economy reports for its lineup. Krafcik said he is aware of competitor complaints that Hyundai’s Corporate Average Fuel Economy reporting would just confuse the public and that Hyundai’s numbers aren’t comparable to other companies because it isn’t a “full-line manufacturer” (i.e., they don’t sell full-size pickup trucks or SUVs.) But he said he firmly believes that “if everyone reported these numbers, it would change the industry” and help move it toward greater fuel economy. “What gets measured, gets done,” he added.

For January, Hyundai’s reported numbers for a sales-weighted average were 34.7 mpg overall (36.4 for cars and 29.8 for trucks), which Krafcik said showed the company was well on its way to its 35 mpg corporate goal for 2015. Hyundai already has two 40 mpg (highway) models—the compact Sonata hybrid and Elantra—and plans to introduce two more this year: the Veloster and Accent. In January, the carmaker sold 4,792 40 mpg cars.

Krafcik indicated Hyundai was carving out a separate path from some other automakers, saying his company was comfortable with the EPA and CARB’s proposed 2025 fuel economy standards in the 47-62 mpg territory. “Now is not the time to lose our resolve,” he added. He said he felt tough standards would drive the industry to follow Hyundai’s pursuit of “democratizing fuel economy,” by adding technology like direct injection and lightweighting across vehicle lines to maximize CO2 reduction.

On the other hand, he did have a concern with government “mandated technologies” and subsidies. “Government should say where they want us to go on CO2 and let us figure out the most efficient way of getting there.”


  • Yegor

    What does he mean “company was well on its way” – 34.7, 35 – they are already practically there!

    And Hyundai sells large crossovers: Santa Fe and even larger Veracruz!

    I told you before 35 MPG is not they high – do not expect huge Plug-ins and Hybrids sales increase because of CAFE 35 MPG 2015 standard.

  • Nelson Lu

    Of course, Honda has no trucks, which are still essential to the American economy. That will misleadingly raise its CAFE.

  • Nelson Lu

    That should read “Hyundai.” Sorry.

  • FamilyGuy

    I think it’s great that Hyundi is doing this (as long as the number are accurate).

    If they choose not to sell trucks, that’s their business (and potential loss of business).

    If you’re going sell stuff well below the 35 MPG threshold, then you need to sell stuff well above the 35 MPG threshold to balance it out.

    Be proud of what you do. Let others challenge you.

  • Anonymous

    Hyundai said: “In January, the carmaker sold 4,792 40 mpg [(highway)] cars.”

    According to the January dash board on this site, Hyundai has not sold any Sonata hybrid, yet.

  • Anonymous

    Not only Hyundai does not offer trucks or pickups, it has withdrew its minivan, which is more versatile and safer than most CUV, from its lineup.

  • Abe

    Amen to the last paragraph. Get rid of subsidies! Although I am not against taxing larger engines (or by vehicle weight, mpg, …).

  • doug

    I have a Hyundai and love their cars, but I have to admit they are very slow to bringing hybrids and EVs to market. They are good at gasoline car efficiency but well behind Ford, GM and Nissan in corporate vision.

  • DC

    If you want to control pollution from gas-powered mobile trash-bins, the solution is actually rather simple, stop building them. Makeing marginally more fuel efficent crap-boxes will not “save the planet” or anything remotely like it. We are far past the point where fuel sipping trash bins will undo the damage of a century of motoring american-style. Better to face up to this reality that keep hoping corrupt welfare-corporations like GM and there ilk will suddenly have a change of heart and actually make something that could remotely be conisdered “clearn”.

  • jonak1

    Just tax gas !
    Add 3 dollars to the price of gasoline, and America will change.

  • Anonymous

    @jonak1

    agree on more tax on gas but too much too fast will collapse even the most robust economy

  • Anonymous

    love how Hyundai is approaching this… possibly the most enlighten major car manufacture in the world. keep pressing on Hyundai!

  • tapra1

    company’s new practice of issuing monthly fuel economy reports for its lineup. Krafcik said he is aware of competitor complaints that Hyundai’s Corporate Average Fuel Economy reporting would just confuse the public and that Hyundai’s numbers aren’t comparable to other companies Mobile News