Honda Plans Quadruple Approach For Carbon Emission Strategy

To meet its carbon emission requirements, Honda said it is embracing all of the major low- and zero-emission categories: hybrid, plug-in, battery electric and fuel cell.

Honda wants to take “a portfolio approach to reducing CO2,” a representative with the company told us, by building models in each of the four segments.

2015 Honda Accord Hybrid

2015 Honda Accord Hybrid

The Japanese carmakers already offers a diverse selection of alternative powertrains; its strongest presence is currently in the hybrid category. Honda has four hybrid models in the U.S. market: the Civic Hybrid, Accord Hybrid, CR-Z and Insight. These models have posted almost 19,000 sales to date this year.

Honda also has one plug-in (a variation of the Accord sedan), one battery electric (the Fit EV) and the only compressed natural gas (CNG) vehicle listed on the dashboard.

This landscape will change slightly in 2016. The hybrid and CNG versions of the Civic will be retired to “allow greater focus on [the] Civic’s sporty new character,” according to John Mendel, executive vice president of American Honda. With only 62 sales to date in 2015, Honda is also scratching off its plug-in Accord.

SEE ALSO: Honda Clarity FCV Debuts With Japan Launch Set For 2016

To fill in these holes, Honda is working on a few different plug-in and electric models, including a high-performance all-electric sports car in

Honda Clarity

2016 Honda Clarity

development for possible production. Honda has also restyled its dedicated CR-Z Hybrid for 2016, and is adding on more upgraded standard features and options for the coupe.

Next spring, the carmaker will also be returning to the fuel cell market when it launches its all-new Clarity FCV in Japan. Europe and the U.S. are slated to receive this sedan sometime later, though a firm date hasn’t been announced.

“We believe in many different technologies,” said the Honda representative of the company’s philosophy for cutting emissions. Hydrogen-powered cars are just “one of the many ways to reduce C02.”