Honda Forbidden Fruit: Diesel-Powered CR-V

Honda’s new 1.6 i-DTEC diesel engine has found another application under the hood of the Honda CR-V, but for Europe only.

Honda announced that in a rigorous independent test on UK roads over more than 500 miles, the CR-V achieved 77.86 mpg, almost a quarter more than its official rating of 62.8 mpg; through the journey, the CR-V diesel used 29.75 liters (6.544 imperial gallons) of fuel.

The CR-V was tested by the team behind the recent “MPG Marathon” under the same rules and conditions as the event. As in the MPG Marathon the car was driven by two independent drivers, John Kerswill and Ian McKean. Carried out over two days, Honda said the test covered 509.5 miles on a variety of roads and conditions and at speeds which represent real-world driving.

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“A lot of people doubt that the official consumption figures of new cars are achievable in real life, and with some cars that might be true,” said John Kerswill. “But we’ve shown conclusively that it’s possible to not only match but far exceed the CR-V 1.6 i-DTEC’s official 62.8 mpg, which is itself a pretty amazing figure for such a large vehicle.”

The test’s results with the British built CR-V comes on the back of another recent success for Honda’s new diesel engine, with the Civic 1.6 i-DTEC scooping third place out of 23 in this year’s MPG Marathon.

During the event, over a 367 mile drive the Civic recorded an overall mpg of 84.87 mpg, only 4 mpg behind the winner.

“Once again our Earth Dreams technology proves its real-world credentials over distances and in conditions that many fleet drivers face every day,” said Lee Wheeler, Manager-Corporate Operations at Honda (UK). “This perfectly illustrates the fact that drivers can have the versatility, practicality and refinement of a larger car but still keep their fuel bills down.”

Based on the official fuel economy, the CR-V 1.6 i-DTEC has the potential to cover up to 800 miles on a single tank of fuel.

Honda said its 1.6 diesel engine is the first to be launched in Europe under its flagship Earth Dreams Technology environmental program.