2012 Honda CR-Z Hybrid

Can a hybrid car also be a sporty car? The answer: It depends on what your expectations are when it comes to hybrid fuel efficiency, and how you define sporty as applied to cars.

Enter Honda’s two-seat 2012 CR-Z which carries over unchanged since being introduced last year. Styled with cues including those of Honda’s sporting CR-X of the ‘80s and ‘90s, the CR-Z strives to be both sporty and a hybrid. The result is a middling achievement of each. On the hybrid side, others trump Honda’s semi-electric approach to hybrid technology when it comes to fuel economy, and the CR-Z with an automatic transmission falls in line with 35 mpg city/39 mpg highway and 37 mpg combined. While those numbers are good enough to place the CR-Z seventh on the EPA’s 2012 Hybrid Fuel Economy list, they are a long way from the Toyota Prius’s leading numbers of 51 city and 48 highway. Plus, when equipped with a six-speed manual transmission – manual shifting helps define sporty – the CR-Z drops two notches with a rating of 31/37/34.

And speaking of sporty, notice there’s the letter “y” after sport; we’re not talking sports car here.

If a car’s styling is part of the definition of sporty, then the CR-Z certainly gets high marks. If fast is included in the equation, then a 0 to 60 mph time of 8.5 seconds falls a little short. Perhaps handling is a more important ingredient for a sporty car than speed, and this is where the CR-Z becomes entertaining and the fun factor of driving is evident.

Powertrain

The CR-Z employs the sixth-generation parallel hybrid system that Honda calls Integrated Motor Assist (IMA). It’s a descriptive moniker in that a thin, pancake-type electric motor/generator is “integrated” between the engine and transmission and only “assists” the gasoline engine. In certain instances, the CR-Z engine does cut off fuel and the car operates briefly on electric power only, but the engine’s parts still move. Like other hybrid vehicles, the CR-Z shuts off the engine when the car comes to a stop, and then fires up again when it’s time to go.

2012 Honda CR-Z Hybrid

The primary power source is a 1.5-liter, four cylinder, 16-valve engine that features Honda’s i-VTEC, a computer controlled variable valve timing and lift system that improves fuel economy and reduces exhaust emissions. The four has a peak output of 113 horsepower at 6,000 rpm and 107 pounds-feet of torque at 4,800 rpm.

The 10-kilowatt electric motor adds a maximum peak output of 13 horsepower at 1,500 rpm and 58 pound-feet of torque at 1000 rpm. Combined output of the gas engine and electric motor is 122 horsepower and 128 pound-feet of torque. And no, the combined horsepower rating of 122 and combined torque number of 128 are not typos. Honda states that peak output for the CR-Z’s gas engine and electric motor occur at significantly different rpm ranges. Therefore, combined power ratings represent peak power delivery in real-world operating conditions and take into account the unique rpm when each peak occurs.

Two transmissions are available, a standard six-speed manual – the only hybrid with three pedals – and a continuously variable transmission (CVT). Drivers who want a manual experience with the CVT can have it, courtesy of shift paddles on the steering wheel. There are seven fixed speed ratios that mimic a manual shifter, and up or down shifts are executed quite quickly. Of note, like a manual transmission, the CVT will stay in the selected gear, a nice sporty touch.

2012 Honda CR-Z Hybrid

Completing the IMA system is a 100.8-volt nickel-metal hydride battery pack and all of the controls to operate the system. Located beneath the cargo area, the battery pack stores electricity generated during regenerative braking and sends power to the electric motor when it assists the engine.

There are three driver-selected operation modes for the powertrain: Sport, Normal and Econ. The Econ mode is the most fuel efficient. It limits the engine’s power and torque while relying more on battery power, and tones down air conditioning effort resulting in laggard forward progress. Selecting the Sport system quickens throttle input response, adds more electric power and tightens up steering effort. On start up, Normal is the default setting and the car operates, well, normally.

Exterior and Interior

The CR-Z’s styling blends design elements from the aforementioned 1984-1991 CR-X and the current Honda Insight with the 2009 CR-Z Concept. When you look at the CR-Z, you have a strong inkling that the designers had a clear vision of what they wanted out of the starting gate: a help-save-the-planet sporty coupe that has no equals in appearance.

2012 Honda CR-Z Hybrid

The distinctive wedge shape originates from a low-slung hood to form an aggressive forward stance. An aerodynamic, raked roofline and sharply abrupt rear are reminiscent of the CR-X, but brought up-to-date with modern flowing lines. The truncated rear, called Kammback, is a design shape that reduces air resistance. The tail’s low drag helps improve fuel consumption.

The hatchback shape produces noteworthy interior space for a two-seat coupe. There’s adequate leg and headroom, even for taller occupants, and the driver and passenger are seated in firm, comfortable cloth sports seats. There’s 25.1 cubic feet of space behind the seats – more than twice the volume of an everyday compact car’s trunk, and more than a Lincoln Town Car. Small bins behind the seats can hide items like a cell phone, and a cargo cover keeps larger objects out of sight.

2012 Honda CR-Z Hybrid

Low slung in stance, a low driving position may not be for everyone. But well-placed pedals and shift lever complement the seat’s positioning. As with other hatchback hybrid vehicles – Toyota Prius, Chevrolet Volt and Honda Insight – rear-ward view is compromised by large support pillars and the horizontal bar that separates the glass in the rear hatch.

The dash layout and styling are a near copy of the CR-Z Concept vehicle. The gauge cluster has a three-dimensional, electroluminescent central analog tachometer with a digital speed display in the center. When the driving modes are selected, the ring around the digital speedometer changes color: green for Econ, blue for Normal and red for Sport. For fuel-economy minded drivers, a display rewards good behavior with a growing number of green leaves.

2012 Honda CR-Z Hybrid

All controls are easy-to-reach, and the switchgear feels substantial and operates with a smooth deliberateness. Interior fit and finish is quite good, while the quality of the materials is not too cheap looking, they are not luxurious either.

Model Lineup

The CR-Z is available in three offerings: Base, EX and EX with Navigation. Unlike other automakers, Honda doesn’t offer a long list of options; each model in the lineup has a set suite of features. Priced starting at $19,545, the base CR-Z is moderately equipped with: keyless entry; power windows, doors and outside mirrors; cruise control; tilt/telescopic steering column – often over looked in small cars; and a six-speaker, 160-watt audio system.

With a sticker price of $21,105, the EX, adds: a leather wrapped steering wheel; polished interior accents; a 360-watt audio system with a subwoofer; and Bluetooth technology. The $22,905 EX with Navigation adds Honda’s navigation system with voice recognition and illuminated steering wheel-mounted navigation controls. Both audio systems are PC-savvy, accepting formats like MP3, WMA and iPod.

2012 Honda CR-Z Hybrid

Honda apparently feels new buyers place little value on the luxuries Boomers desire: the coupe is not available with leather seats, let alone, heated seats or even a sunroof. Buyers can, however, order a 17-inch tire and alloy wheel package in place of the standard 16-inch set up.

For safety, all CR-Z models are equipped with anti-lock disc brakes with brake-force distribution, electronic stability control and a full complement of airbags, including curtain-style bags.

 

Road Review

 

Editor’s Note: This road test of a 2012 CR-Z was previously a stand-alone review we’ve merged into the general review.

Last year, HybridCars.com staffers drove a CVT-equipped Honda CR-Z on a 125-mile loop to see how the sporty hybrid coupe fared. The drive consisted of a broad sampling of road conditions: highways, town streets, and sweeping country roads. At the end of the run the coupe tallied 35.3 miles per gallon – three tenths more mpg than the EPA city rating of 35 mpg in the city, and nearly 4 mpg shy of the 39 highway rating. The conclusion: maybe a little too raucous during in-town driving, but overall what most drivers will experience.

2012 Honda CR-Z Hybrid

A few weeks later, I checked out a manual shift CR-Z EX with navigation for a week. Logging 379 miles during the seven days, fuel mileage was recorded in three segments: 73 miles of normal running errands and shopping in town; 132 mile drive from Olympia, Wash. to Seattle during morning and late afternoon brake lights and gridlocks; and 174 miles of hey, let’s flog this thing and see just how sporty it is, and oh yeah, how much gas did the little four-banger guzzle.

No one has ever accused me of having a light foot on the go pedal, although I have changed my driving habits the past several years. I just didn’t know how much until I looked at the mpg numbers of the CR-Z that said, “Oh no, you’re becoming a greenie!”

Great MPG, With Some Work

During my drives about town the colored ring around the speedometer was primarily green, but I didn’t need it as a reminder that mode selection was Econ. The word sluggish best defines the forward motion of the CR-Z in this setting, and following the shift-up and shift-down indicator arrows was foreign even to my changed driving habits. Really Honda? Up shift from 1st to 2nd at 15 mph, and from 2nd to 3rd at 18 mph? But, it works; fuel economy averaged 43.3 mpg – 12.3 more than the government’s 31 mpg. Makes one wonder how those EPA folks come up with their numbers. Oh please, don’t tell me I have succumbed to hypermiling.

2012 Honda CR-Z Hybrid

I saw a lot of truck bumpers on the Interstate drive to Seattle and back. The Econ mode seemed to be the logical choice during the seemingly endless stop, go, stop commuter traffic movement. Unlike the CVT-equipped Zs that automatically shut the engine off when the car is stopped, manual shifters require the transmission be in neutral. Holding the clutch in with the right foot on the brake pedal does not turn off the engine. So, constantly shifting to neutral and then shoving back into gear to restart is a chore. But again, the system works, and with maybe 50 miles out of the 132 total in the Normal mode, the little hatch scored 39.2 mpg. Hmmm, that’s the highway rating given to the more fuel efficient CVT equipped CR-Z. Did the Feds get things backwards?

After five hours that covered 174 miles of driving primarily in Sport mode, the coupe registered 32.7 mpg. That’s a number even a Prius would be envious of with the tachometer close to red line for many of those miles.

Sporty, As In Handling, Not Horsepower

The CR-Z is built on the same platform as the Insight hybrid, but engineers didn’t just copy, cut and paste. The structure is more rigid, the wheelbase is clipped 4.5 inches, overall length is shortened by some 8 inches and the car is considerably wider and lower. Add the suspension from the Insight – McPherson struts and a rear torsion-beam setup – and you have Honda’s formula for a sporty coupe.

Around town the CR-Z has a smooth, fairly well-damped ride and it’s easy-to-drive, easy-to-park and with wide doors, easy-to-get in and out of. I found the highway ride to be firm, controlled and pleasant, not harsh. Bumps and those pesky expansion joints had a negligible impact.

Like all Honda four cylinder VTEC engines, this one brings on power in a linear, effortless manner. Its response to throttle input is prompt, almost brisk, except in the Econ mode, and if it lacks urgency it makes up for it in pluck and willingness. And when pressed – to merge with freeway traffic, for example – it does get noisy. There is a surprise, however, just left of the steering wheel. Select the piano key-like button marked Sport and there’s right-now throttle response. It’s like the Honda suddenly found an additional 50 horsepower.

2012 Honda CR-Z Hybrid

However, the CR-Z’s sporty personality isn’t derived from horsepower, it’s all about the handling. The attention to vehicle dynamics is surprising. The coupe’s precise and nicely weighted electric rack-and-pinion steering tracks true with good feedback, making abrupt lane changes and sudden, tight curves a delight.

Should you drive slightly over your capabilities, the stability control system and anti-lock brakes respond in quick fashion. Under brisk cornering there is an expected amount of understeer and a moderate dose of body roll. But the Z never felt like the average driver might fight for control.

Unlike some hybrids, the brakes have good pedal feel and are not grabby. The manual transmission offers relatively short throws with clean gates and a comfortable, easily engaged clutch action. Gear ratios are well selected to give the car a suitable launch, first through third gears.

Hybrid puritans will scoff at the CR-Z’s fuel efficiency and driving enthusiasts will pooh-pooh its performance. But kudos to Honda for developing a car that is fun-to-drive and fuel-efficient.

 

The Car For You?

Hybrid puritans will scoff at the CR-Z’s fuel efficiency and driving enthusiasts will pooh-pooh its performance. But kudos to Honda for developing a car that is fun-to-drive and fuel efficient. The Detroit News’s reviewer put it this way: “There will be some people who just fall in love with the CR-Z. They will look past the things so many see as detriments. They will be those willing to admit they don’t need everything in a single vehicle and use the CR-Z as a tool for getting around in style. They know that not everyone needs a back seat for imaginary friends who will never ride in their car.”

2012 Honda CR-Z Hybrid

There are other choices for a sporty car that not only offer decent fuel economy, but also have room for two or three actual friends. Ford’s nifty Fiesta SE hatchback with manual transmission and optional SYNC and Sound package lists for $16,265 and serves up 29 mpg city and 38 mpg highway. For $24,235, Volkswagen’s Golf TDI offers German engineered handling while the torquey diesel engine delivers 30 mpg in town and 42 on the highway. Perhaps the closest fun-to-drive two-door competitor is the Mini Cooper. The modest-powered base model starts at $19,500, dispenses 29 city/37 highway fuel mileage and carves canyon roads like nothing in this price range.

The CR-Z isn’t the only hybrid car that has sporty performance characteristics. Lexus began selling its CT 200h last year that has a combined city-highway fuel mileage of 42 mpg. But it’s starting price of $29,120 puts it out of reach for a large number of buyers. The Z’s starting price of $19,345 makes it an every-man’s green car, and for now it’s the only sporty game in town.

Prices are Manufacturer Suggested Retail Price (MSRP) at time of publication and do not include destination charges, taxes or licensing.

This article was updated on Feb. 23, 2012. The first comments below are from original publication prior to the vehicle’s release.

 


Pros
  • Fun to drive
  • Cool sporty look
  • Available in manual transmission
Cons
  • Not great mileage and only so sporty
  • HIgh road noise
  • Only seats two

Price quote for Honda CR-Z

2012 Honda CR-Z Hybrid
Base MSRP: $20,000
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  • Scott Z

    Well it does look nice but I am not sure about the overall idea. I would love to buy a two seater for the commute to the office but I just can not consider purchasing a 3rd car for commuting that gets 39 MPG. Now if it could get 60+…

  • Wes

    I love it. There’s nothing affordable for the green-minded enthusiast out there, and this is a step in the right direction – especially with the manual transmission! Let’s hope they actually build it.

  • J-Bob

    Honda has a great idea, just the wrong price point. Low 20′s? That’s Prius territory, not to mention the Prius gets better gas milage, more room, and more power and storage. Not really seeing an advantage here unless they can get the pricepoint to around $15k.

  • Tony

    I’m not sure that the CR-Z will be less powerfull that a Pruis…and the big point with that car compare to the Prius, is that’s is gonna be fun to drive and sporty!! Its also a better looking car

  • Phillip U.

    39 miles per gallon doesn’t seem real impressive. A guy I work with gets a real-world 40 mpg in his Jetta TDI which, as he explains it, produces fewer harmful emissions than a Prius (again, his claim, not mine). Why couldn’t this be hooked up to a hybrid system to get even better efficiency?

    And to get a little off-topic, I have a question about MPG ratings. I know the the EPA recently revised their methodology for figuring the MPG of a vehicle but I was reading an article on treehugger about how in the late ’70s and ’80s, there were so many compacts that got MPG ratings between 30 and 50 MPG. So how is it that we’re still at that level some thirty years later?

    Of course the answer is going to be a combination of several factors, but I would love to understand them a bit more. Is the discrepancy mostly due to better estimation of actual fuel consumption (and if so is there a way to figure out what they old numbers should have been)? The switch to unleaded fuel? Is it the added weight of required safety features? Emissions features?

  • Mr.Bear

    It’s a $20k sports car not a $20k sedan. How many roadsters start of at $20k or get 39 mpg. I’m guessing very few.

    With that said, it had better have some serious zip in it or it’s pointless.

    I also want to mention that Honda said the Insight would start at $17.5k and it’s actually starting at $19.8k. So when they say the CRZ will start at $20k, I think we all ought to expect somethin around $25k.

  • Anonymous

    My buddy had a 70 something Datsun B210. He got 51 MPG on the highway. I would say the added weight of all the stuff required now along with the weight af expected accessories.

  • GR

    Ditto that J Bob.

    I’m not sure how much of a marketshare they’d get with this car at that price point. They’re competing against the Prius and the Insight at that point.

    Also, I’d hope they’d have an automatic as an option. This car would be perfect for me. But for a hybrid that only gets in the high 30′s (when the Prius/Fusion gets in the low 50′s) it may end up losing my business to that or another hybrid (especially since I’d prefer a domestic-made vehicle).

  • Anonymous

    Wow I can’t believe every new hybrid doesn’t get the same mileage as a Prius or a 20 year old car with no modern safety features (i.e. death trap). Seriously folks, realize that if it were so easy to make a safe hybrid that gets 60 MPGs, it would have been done already. And with 5(!) trim levels on the ugly Prius why should any other maker even bother???

    I do expect this car to have some serious zip to it. A manual + electric motor should be a lot of fun. If it were permanently stuck in CVT eco mode it would probably post mileage in the 40′s. Booring…

    I can’t believe someone hasn’t accused Honda of copying the Prius, when in fact they are borrowing cues from their own CRX, much the same way the Prius copied the original Honda Insight. Ouch!

  • Dom

    Finally!!!!!!!!!!!!!! A hybrid with a manual transmission!!! Boy I’d be tempted to buy it!!! Way to go Honda! Yeah, I know, the original Insight and Civic hybrids had manual transmissions, but they’re gone now… and not nearly as slick-looking as this CR-Z.

  • BoilerCivicHy

    Hey great a small two seat car that gets worse gas mileage than my 4 door civic. Why is it that no one seems to understand tha what people want is a small, inexpensive car for commuting with HIGH gas mileage. Is that too much to ask? Give me a small 2 seater for $15,000 and get 60+mpg and I will buy, until then, keep your cars Honda. Honda has now missed the boat with 3 new models, the Insight, the hybrid fit, and the hybrid CR-V, but hey keep trying.

  • J-Bob

    @Tony
    The Prius comes with a 1.8 liter engine, giving it 25% more displacement than the CR-Z. Combined its pushing 98hp.

    The new CR-Z has 1.5 liter engine. If they compensate with a more powerful electric motor, then you might have an argument. But since they fail to mention that spec, guess we’ll have to wait. Since it’ll be getting 10mpg less than a Prius, that might be the case, sacrifice range for a more zippy drive.

    At $25k however, that car is still overpriced to be a real competitor. I’d get a Jetta TDI with the same gas milage, more space, a ‘sporty’ appearance, and more power.

  • rusty24334

    well im a good ol fashioned redneckish texan dude and i think that the goood ol 6mile a gallon huge jacked up freakin monster truck wheeled chevy blazer is way better and manlier than a hybrid

  • rusty24334

    well im a good ol fashioned redneckish texan dude and i think that the goood ol 6mile a gallon huge jacked up freakin monster truck wheeled chevy blazer is way better and manlier than a hybrid

  • JessicaH

    FINALLY, something resembling a sports car that is also a hybrid! And you’re telling me that someone with an income of less than $200K can buy it? Where do I sign up?!

    I’ve been waiting for a hybrid sports car for YEARS. Even time a company gives us a whiff of a sports hybrid concept model I get excited. It may be surprising, but those of us without children loathe 4-doors. I only started considering getting a Prius after none of the concepts went anywhere.

    Alas, now I live in SF and recently sold my car. No matter how bad I want a sporty hybrid, there is just no use for it for me with the public transit here :(

  • mrs. barnes

    I think that this is a very awesome car. As a young buyer it appeals to me and it isn’t all about the gas mileage its about how it is greener for the earth. I’d buy it. but I do agree it should be cheaper.

  • RKRB

    Honda’s proposed CR-Z may help expand the market for fuel-efficient cars — a good thing for everyone.

    For those wondering why current economy cars can’t beat older Hondas and Datsuns:

    Our office gets two car magazines, which sometimes have articles for those planning to buy fuel-efficient cars. In mid-2009, Car and Driver compared an older Chevy Metro to the new Prius and Insight. As I recall, they concluded the Metro did get respectable mileage, but everything else about the car (ride, driveability, noise, interior quality, etc.) was markedly inferior.

    July’s Automobile compared an old 1985 Honda CRX with the 2010 Insight, and observed the CRX was considerably more fun to drive and got even better mileage, but the CRX lacked a rear seat and weighed over 1000 pounds less (the CRX weighed about 60% as much as the Insight).
    A passenger car like the CRX would probably never pass today’s crash testing standards, unless it was made of expensive material, and the older cars couldn’t match the interior appointments of today’s models. The Insight’s extra structural weight may help explain why the newer model cars don’t get better mileage than the older models.

  • Lost Prius to wife

    Phillip U, just go to http://www.fueleconomy.gov. There is a good chance that both the old and the new EPA mileage ratings will be there.

  • Bruce Johnstohatown

    I think that for that size of a car I would prefer a Mini Cooper, which costs $18,800 the base model with a manual, they get up to 37 MPG (according to fueleconomy.gov), have a nice sporty look and they do not need and additional motor or bateries that in the long run will cost a lot to replace.

    I like the car, but I don’t understand why it cannot reach at least 50 mpg. I have a Pontiac Vibe and it gets 33 MPG on the highway with more space and is taller than the CR-Z so buy a new car just to get an additional 6 miles per gallon does not sound like a good deal. I agree with J-BOB on the Jetta TDI comment.

  • Donald Kwong

    I’m guessing that this is similar to the Accord Hybrid. Primarily running on gas first with a manual transmission and then use the electric engine to give it a boost. The mileage sounds about the same too.

  • Michael marks

    It’s not all about mileage for me. I have been driving a minivan for the past 13 years, and now the kids are grown and in college, I want to drive something “fun”. I am cross-shopping the CRZ against the Miata and Mini, not the Prius and Insight. If I want a back seat, I would not even consider the CRZ. With that being said, I cannot wait for Honda to bring this car to market. If a fully loaded CRZ is priced in the mid-20′s, I will purchase one and retire the ever-faithful minivan to weekend shopping trips and family vacations.

  • Steve Williams

    I like the idea of a fun to drive hybrid .The looks of this sport hybrid are just terrific . I just hope it comes with a twin clutch auto option, SoCal traffic and a manual trannys just don’t do it for me anymore.

  • MattRuss85

    I’ll just settle for a 1991 CRX HF it gets almost 20 more mpg

  • Jake Torrents

    I’m really looking forward to this car. About time an automaker produced a manual transmission hybrid sports coupe. But Honda won’t have an easy time selling it if it enters near $25k.

  • jdubb_19

    Corporate executives from Honda recently visited our store. They are going from store to store getting feedback from the salesforce to help them understand why the 2010 Insight isn’t selling as well as they planned. They were looking to achieve 100k units by EOY. The current YTD is under 18,000!!!

    The key points that were discussed in the meeting were mpg, the back seat, and visibility. Every post from every forum I visit says the same thing:

    1 – I want 50+ mpg
    2 – I need a comfortable front seat for us bigger Americans
    3 – Give me a hybrid with more power

    Eventhough the window sticker for the Fit says 33 mpg hwy, thanks to the mpg computer in the car, I have customers that have reported 37-41 mpg hwy. The MSRP for a Fit Sport with automatic transmission and a navigation system (this is the top Fit model) is $19k. With that said, why would any customer pay an extra $5000 for a hybrid anything that gets a whopping 40 mpg hwy!!!

    I’ll answer that for you:

    Lets say the average person drives 15,000 miles per year, and the non-hybrid Fit gets 39 mpg hwy. That would come out to $1000 per year on gas. (15,000 miles / 39 mpg = 384 gallons. 384 gallons * $2.60 per gallon = $998.40 per year)

    Now, if you just plug the mpg of the hybrid into this equation, 48 mpg hwy, you get $812 per year. So, you would save $188 per year on gas because you got the hybrid. However, you paid $5000 more because it’s a mid-$20k priced hybrid.

    Well, $5000 hybrid price premium / $188 per year savings on gas = 26 YEARS OF DRIVING JUST TO BREAK EVEN!!!

    If the CR-Z gets over 40 mpg hwy and has a price tag at $20k or less, offer both the manual and CVT, it would out sell EVERYTHING!

  • Marko321
  • David

    Thanks for the comments jdubb_19. I recently visited a Honda store to review the top of the line Insight Hybrid and came away less than enthused about the car. My general conclusion is the car works for me if I only care about gas mileage. However, it is not as big or comfortable as other cars, including the Honda Civic Hybrid, does not have as many features (I spend 2 hours a day in my car!), feels plastic (if I touch something it might break), and has that goofy back window (hard to see out of). Comparing it to other cars, factoring in the extra $$$ Honda wants for the hybrid, etc. and I am looking for a different car. Sorry, Honda, but no sale.

    BTW, after all of the test drives this 2010 had, the computer only showed 24.x MPG average. :(

  • David

    Oops, forgot to mention the configured price of the Honda Insight Hybrid (again, fairly high end model) was $27k+. That is $7k+ too much IMHO.

  • John K.

    I’ve posted this off and on several times previously: What I want (and what Honda should have offered *years* ago), is a hybrid version of their Civic Coupe. R&D required: minimal. They should be able to ramp up that right away. The current Coupe is one of the best looking cars out there, regardless of price. It would be the best looking hybrid in the world!

    Why haven’t they done this? Instead they waste a TON of money on this mutant — not a true CRX sports car successor and yet there’s no real advantage over a hybrid Civic Coupe.

    Why did they do the CR-Z instead of a Civic Coupe hybrid which they could have offered years ago (when gas prices were through the roof)?

    All I can say is that I hope Honda switches to Li ion batteries (smaller size & weight for the same power) ASAP.

    And please, offer a hybrid Civic Coupe before you remodel the Civic line again (and make the Coupe ugly again).

  • Clark

    I purchased a CRX 1.3 liter manual in March of 1984 in the San Francisco Bay area. Lived in the city …. I consistently achieved 55 mpg in the city and 61 mpg on the highway for the next 14 years.

    If they could get that good of mileage in 1984 …. then a hybrid today should get at least 80 to 100 on the highway.

  • Al W.

    So, it’s ugly, and by the time this is out, I can buy a Ford Fiesta that will get better highway and combined mileage than what Honda’s stating this will get (and only be 1-2 points less in city), will look WAY better, will have more technogoodies, will be far less destructive to the environment overall (since manufacturing the batteries effectively rapes the environment), will put out similar hp/torque to power a considerably lighter vehicle, will be far more enjoyable to drive since it won’t be carting around a bunch of dead weight (i.e. batteries), have seating for more than two people, and will cost less. Realistically speaking, the Fiesta will be superior in EVERY aspect to the CR-Z.

    Great business proposition you’ve got there, Honda. Why don’t you stick to making boring transportation appliances like the completely blandovision Accord and leave making real cars to the real car companies?

  • Al W.

    Also, a drivetrain that’s only putting out 120 HP and roughly the same torque and is being asked to cart around such a portly car cannot be seriously called anything remotely resembling sporty. Not sporty. Not enthusiastic. Not spirited. Not even entertaining.

    Bland. Anemic. Pathetic. Not even credible in 1988.

  • Franklyn

    Well I guess thats the reason that we are in the place we are now, With so much pollution in the air and the prices of gas are what they are is because of ol fashioned redneckish texan dudes like you. I mean seriously how ignorant of a comment is that. This is the reason why we have to get all this oil from the chinesse and afghanis because of people like you.

  • Mr.cody

    all the sites I have looked at show the Prius having less emissions than the jetta TDI. However one site claims that from dust to dust the Jetta is cleaner due to emmissions from production and disposal of the Prius battery. Their methodology is disputed however.

  • Al W.

    Franklyn, you’ve missed my point entirely. The CR-Z is a car with no reason to exist.

    If it’s meant to be a fuel-efficient car, it fails. The upcoming Ford Fiesta, with a convential gasoline engine, will get very similar EPA numbers for mileage. Never mind that the CR-Z will leave a larger overall footprint because of battery manufacturing and will be less useful. 31/37/33 out of a 2-seater hybrid? Are you f—ing kidding me?!? The 1995 Buick LeSabre that I drove to college could do 32 on the freeway, and that was a 3,800-pound full-sized sedan powered by a large V6.

    If it’s meant to be a sporty car, it fails. 120-some horsepower and roughly the same torque out of a car that heavy, even if it’s only at 1,500 rpm, will not be sporty and therefore not an enjoyable driving experience. The aforementioned Fiesta will be putting down similar HP/torque numbers powering a lighter car. So far I’m seeing 9.7 seconds as a 0-60 time, which is NOT sporty. Hell, my 3,500 pound Honda Element with a 4-banger does better 0-60 than that.

    Simply put, the car fails. If I can buy an EQUALLY-EFFICIENT conventionally-powered car that is also MORE useful and MORE enjoyable to drive, and pay LESS to do so, why would I want to buy a CR-Z?

    Hybrids are not the be-all and end-all of efficient or environmentally-conscious motoring. A Chevy Tahoe Hybrid is still a gas-guzzler. A well-maintained older car still has a smaller environmental footprint than a brand-new Prius when calculated over the life of the car. People like you that believe that anyone who questions the supremacy of hybrids give all hybrid proponents a bad name.

    And for the record, you couldn’t pay me enough money to step foot in Texas, let alone live there.

  • Nauga

    It looks great but I can still get a SMART car that has a 1-liter engine, can do 90 miles per hour and gets 41 miles to the gallon. Plus it’s $5,000 less….
    If they can get this car under $20,000 it will be a contender!

  • Bill C

    My ’88 CRX Si was absolutely my favorite car ever. Quick, agile, fun to drive, and it averaged about 34 MPG around town even when it was driven, er, aggressively. With all the “advances” car makers are always touting, I would expect the CR-Z to get much better mileage. 39 MPG doesn’t really cut it. And it’s kind of ugly.

  • Anonymous

    It is estimated to get 39 MPG using normal mode. The CR-Z comes with 3 modes. Sport mode (probably 20-25MPG), normal mode (36/39 MPG) and Econ mode (which some reviews have stated to be estimated in the 55-60MPG). Also don’t forget that the car also comes with the Eco Assist and Eco Score, allowing you to increase MPG even more. I wish that Honda would have provided with the estimated MPG of all 3 modes as it would help a lot.

  • carguy

    There is no compelling reason to buy this car. It’s too underpowered, slow, not very frugal, not very practical (which would be fine if it had any decent hp or speed (122 hp and 0-62 in 9.7 seconds is dismal specs for any car let alone one with sporty pretensions that cost well over $25,000) and it has all the disadvantages of a hybrid with very little to show for it (added weight, complexity, and costs). There are too many better cars that will outperform this car and costs much less money. Although, I’m not the first person to state this, it is very appropriate– making this car a hybrid (at least with Honda’s poor performing ima system) makes no sense and Honda should have realize this simple fact.

  • Bill

    Time to set a few things straight. I love all of the opinions here…non with a spark of accuracy. First, David, 24 MPG?? Not possible, not even towing a trailer. Where do you come up with this stuff? Every credible test, Car & Driver, R & T, Autoweek etc, puts the insight in the low 40′s to the low 50′s. Motion Lab’s did an eco test level ground @ 60mph…averaged 62mpg. A friend bought one for his teen son who thrashed it for a full tank…38mpg, and I mean he thrashed it.

    I bought an Insight in September and average an hour a day driving it. Mileage is consistent at 45mpg in mixed city/highway driving. So far we have seen a low of 43.5 and a high of 47. Live in Utah at 5000 feet and the terrain is not flat. My business partner drives a Prius and regardless of what the EPA says, he gets about 2 mpg less driving the same route. If our batteries are both full, I am slightly quicker from a stop. When depleted, he is quicker. In the twisties, Insight vs Prius? Hands down, the Insight runs away from the Toyota. Interior?..Hands down, Prius is larger in back. It is typical Honda quality, does not “feel plastic” and no Dave, nothing has broken off. Oh yeah, one more hands down for the Honda…Best CVT out there. Silky smooth but can be used as a seven speed with the paddle shifters…genius. Some sniggles: needs a moonroof, needs audio controls on the steering wheel. Both available on the CRZ hybrid.

    Lastly, $27,000?? on what planet? I bought an optioned out EX for 23K (24K out the door) This is a great car, If you are looking at a hybrid, don’t miss it. Definitely a contender for some people.

  • Robt

    This car delievers neither performance nor great mileage ..the design is great but Honda needs to up the performance or give us 50 mpg .. unfortunately this car makes no sense unless of course it comes in at 15K purchase which it does not ..so in performance , mileage and price it makes no sense …so I am sure people will buy it.
    The Miata and Prius make more sense based on mileage and performance.

  • usbseawolf2000

    Well, they don’t want to wait 6 months to get the Prius.

  • Nelson Lu

    So, this car has 122 HP while getting (slightly) worse fuel-efficiency than the 191-HP Ford Fusion Hybrid?

  • tom lizard

    I bought a new red CRX in 1986 and the car was flat out amazing. It turned heads everywhere. I marveled every time I climbed into that pocket rocket. As fate would have it I had a pickup truck ram me on the highway, hitting the driver’s door straight on at 45+ mph. The CRX was totalled but did a suberb job of protecting me.

    The CRZ makes me wish I needed such a car as it has the same IT factor of the CRX.

  • Charles

    I assume the CR-Z will use the same under powered 13 HP electric motor (IMA) sandwiched between the ICE and transmission. This is their same old not very good hybrid system. If Honda would put three or four IMAs in the car and the battery to back them up, you might have something fun to drive and that gets great MPG.

    For the money I would go for the Fiesta or Mini.

  • Anonymous

    except the Prius looks like a dork mobile and this actually has styling and more power and comes in a manual

  • Robert Lord

    I’d buy one in a minute if it got 57 mpg and was a plug in. The manual option is attractive. I have a 2004 Honda Civic Hybrid manual. No problems in 6 years and an average of 46 mpg, and we keep precise records. It doesn’t seem like progress to have a car which seats 2 rather than 5, but gets 10 less mpg.

    Bob

  • Shines

    Wow! a lot of great comments. The CR-Z certainly is generating “buzz”.
    And my humble opinion…
    What is the competion for this 2 seat sports coupe?
    Chevy Vette at $60K? nope
    Porche Boxter or Carrerras at $80K+ ? nope
    Lotus Elise and similar at $30K+ and 25 mpg? Maybe
    Tesla Roadster at $109K? nope
    Civic, Mini, TDI? these are 4 seaters – maybe they are a better value but that is not what a 2 seater is all about.
    Other hybrids that get better mpg – again not the same class.
    Mazda Miata at $25K and 25 MPG – I think this is the CR-Z’s closest competition. The Miata is a rag top so the fun factor may be higher in the summer or warm climates. Still I think the CR-Z looks awesome! EPA rated at 37MPG is pretty damn good for this class.
    (for all you folks comparing with 80s something CRXs and B210s etc – those were lightweight, unsafe non-comparable with today’s models. If I were younger I might buy a CR-Z.
    It should have Honda reliability and if it handles as well as the fit and other Hondas that will be sporty enough for the price.
    I think it will be a success.

  • John K.

    Just a reminder to everyone that the EPA fuel mileage test has changed since the CRX and that the CR-Z, because it is a hybrid, should get a LOT better EPA City mileage than a CRX if it was tested under the revised test.

    IMO, if the CR-Z survives until then, getting smaller and lighter Li ion batteries in the 2013 model year might help it’s performance: less weight and faster discharge may equate into faster 0-60 mph times. That’s when it may be worth buying.

    Oh, and an optional sunroof would be nice . . . .

  • tim_wildcat

    Well as a person who loves a CRX and has always wanted a new and updated one. This will be the hit on that point. As most have you have pointed out this is not the gas saver everyone was thinking it would be. I think actually the honda owners of most CRX’s have gotten what they wanted so if you liked the CRX get a CRZ. If i can afford it I would buy it..

  • Rice Grinder

    UNBELIEVABLE! MY 1989 HONDA CRX REMAINS A SUPERIOR VEHICLE WITHOUT ALL OF THIS BATTERY GARBAGE. IS THIS WHAT WE HAVE BEEN WAITING 20 YEARS FOR? SADLY ANOTHER LOST DECADE FOR JAPAN. THIS CAR SHOULD GET 70 MPG IF IT WERE ENGINEERED PROPERLY. KIND OF REMINDS ME OF THE BRILLANCE BEHIND THE CHEVY VEGA.

  • Xenios

    This mpg thing is absolutely wrong!
    The tests have been changed since the article was printed and this beatiful CR-Z gets an average fuel economy of 56.5mpg.
    I don’t know if i can mention the trusty website i saw it but check it out a bit before slapping tags without checking it people.
    And for those who said about its rivals it the Scirocco and the new Volvo C30 Drive.
    WhatCar may help you around

  • MarkRaymond

    Fine, idiots. Go buy a nice 1984 CRX and enjoy yourselves when someone crashes into you.

    The ignorance in some of the comments is unreal.

  • MarkRaymond

    Fine, idiots. Go buy a nice 1984 CRX and enjoy yourselves when someone crashes into you.

    The ignorance in some of the comments here is unreal.

  • AutoEnthusiast

    Hey, I know that those are the figures, but those are just the EPA figures, and when exactly has the EPA really been reliable? Whole deal is that already in Great Britain the CR-Zed (The Brits say it funny… but its cool) is getting around 58 miles to the gallon for them, which is pretty damn good. Most people driving standard Honda Civics with an EPA estimated 31 MPG average are actually averaging above 40 miles per gallon. Hell, my 1996 Prelude VTEC, the car that according to the EPA is supposed to average around 21 MPG, I’m getting just under 28 average including my spirited sprints to fifth gear.

    The whole problem with ANY car today is weight. The CRZ weighs over 2600 pounds, which is heavy, but it is also one hundred and fifty pounds lighter than the tiny as hell S2000. (Which is a great car… but I can’t fit in it to save my soul.) The CRX the 1989 1.6L Si weighed in at 1,978 pounds, more than seven hundred pounds lighter than the CRZ. You want to know the reason why this makes such a difference?

    Safety Standards.

    I guarantee that if you pulled out even HALF of the crap the U.S. Government requires that cars have for increased survivability, the CRZ would be hundreds of pounds lighter. Get rid of that super awesome A.C.E. body structure that Honda has to have in every car for safety and I can guarantee that we can drop another couple hundred pounds. Why don’t we pull out all of those pesky as hell air bags, becuase honestly, who needs them?

    Also, what about having to meet those ridiculous CAFE standards from hell? I swear that half of the new weight in the CRZ goes to special equipment to make sure that the only thing that comes out of the tail-pipe is happiness and rainbows… all for the state of California. This whole Global Warming thing has ruined the way people have to purchase cars. I don’t care about how much carbon gets thrown into the air by my vehicle because that active volcano out in Iceland has produced more CO2 since it has been activated than the entire history of the human race. Believe me, even those inactive volcanoes put out more CO2 than the industrial revolution… and what are we supposed to do about it, plug them up?

    Overall, the CRZ is a spirited successor to the CRZ. Yes, I am just as disappointed that they won’t be offering a K20 engine, but if you think about it, running a K20 requires premium fuel… which almost defeats the purpose of a hybrid. And yes, I am just as sad that they won’t be allowing for different power-train options becuase I would love to put a larger engine in the thing…

    However. If there is one thing that Honda is good at is its ability to give the people vehicles that are extremely easy to tune and upgrade. Within a year, I have no doubt that the best companies will have designed amazing parts and pieces to make the CRZ a lot faster and more fuel efficient than it was before.

    Throw in a new 2011 V2 Air Intake from AEM, add 10-15 horsepower (Some air intakes can add as much as 20 horsepower!) and remove the restrictive factory air intake which will increase fuel economy. Get rid of that restrictive exhaust and add in a freeflow exhaust for a throatier, sportier exhaust note which will add anywhere between 2-10 horsepower and better fuel economy. Remove the stock radiator and throw in a nice Godspeed radiator that will improve fuel economy and add about 5 horsepower by keeping the car cooler more efficiently. How about removing those small headers and getting a set of DC Sport headers thrown on there that will increase exhaust flow, which of course increases MPG and adds anywhere between 5-10 horsepower. And once you have all of that going, you can tune the ECU to get the maximum performance out of all of those parts you just added on there, which could maybe squeeze out 1 or 2 more horsepower and as always, better fuel economy.

    I can guarantee you that the parts you just added are lighter than the factory equipment and much more efficient. Just with those alone you could be looking at a ten MPG gain along with a… lets just say at worst a gain of 23 horsepower and maybe 25 torque, and in best case a gain of 42 horsepower and about the same torque. All of that with a worst case gain of 5 MPG and best case 10 MPG. So that will boost the horsepower from 122 to 147, worse case, and from 122 to 164 best case with improved fuel economy and a much more responsive engine. (And a sick throaty exhaust note to boot!)

    Now, if you want to, you could cut out the freeflow exhaust and add on a dual turbocharger kit with an intercooler kit as well, and feasibly be able to tune the engine to run leaner than it already is, and with the increased compression it will increase fuel economy as well. You could feasibly run about 6 pounds of boost in the engine without damaging any of its delicate parts for a gain of anywhere between 50-100 horsepower and even more torque! Although it would be required to run on premium becuase of the high compression, with the increased fuel economy from all of the upgrades as well as the turbo-kit, I have no doubt that you couldn’t get up into the high fifties and low sixties of MPGs.

    Anyways. What I’m trying to get at here is that not all is as it seems, the car is forced to be way heavier than it should be becuase of safety standards and because of ridiculous fuel cleanliness standards that are being set by the world because of a fake global warming scam. The car is a hybrid that is not meant to be fast, but meant to drive and handle like a sports car…. which is way more than I can say for the souless-econobox called the Toyota Prius. That thing is no fun to drive no matter how hard you push its tiny engine.

    The CRZ is not meant to compete with the Prius in the super efficient hybrid market because was not designed too. If they wanted to they could go back to the 2001 Honda Insight which had super high gas mileage but not versatility or horsepower to speak of… not to mention it was a lot lighter because back in 2001 the safety standards were a lot lower and did not require any different number of collapsible body structures or dozens of airbags hidden in the ceilings and crap.

    Now, this is not a rant directed at you Scott Z, but more of a generalized rant directed at everyone who seemed to have purchased a High Efficiency Honda CRX way back in the 1980s. To those people, you have to realize that Honda also has to make this affordable, its not like he can make everything carbon fiber and acid dip the body to reduce weight. If you would like to, you can go ahead and remove that passenger seat, all of that unnecessary upholstery and electronics, and you too can shave four hundred pounds off the car and make it a lot faster!

    Personally, I’m just going to tune the hell out of it and see what I can’t get out of not only the engine, but the entire vehicle as a whole.

    This is supposed to a be a middle of the road vehicle, not a sports car, but not a true hybrid… becuase true sports cars don’t get great gas mileage and true hybrids are no fun to drive. So going for a sweet spot of having a medium efficiency hybrid that is hella fun to drive seems like a winning strategy. People are talking a lot of smack about the CRZ, but until it comes out, reserve your judgment and drive one yourself and always take those Car websites and magazines reviews with a grain of salt… becuase if you really look at it objectively, most of those reviewers have spent quite a bit of time reviewing and driving the hell out of real sports cars.

    So reserve judgement and drive it for yourself, and if you want to improve it, like I will, then tune it… becuase that has always been the one thing that Honda has been able to do that no other car company in the world can, and that is make their cars blank slates for the owners to tweak as they please.

    This is Matt signing off.

  • ramjet

    Let me get this right. Honda is going to try another hybrid that does not even come close to the Prius in gas mileage and the only thing they are saying is it is fun to drive? Fun to drive does not put money into my pocket. Honda has practically admitted that the Insight was a bust, the Crosstour is not doing much better, and now a “new fuel efficient hybrid” that costs more than a regular Civic with the same or less gas mileage. Keep trying Honda. I will continue to pass your “fun to drive hybrid” at the gas station as I travel miles farther in my Prius.

  • disappointed hondafan

    I for one find this car to be a total disappointment as it really shows Honda did little to make this car something special that would bring rave reviews from almost everyone. The powertrain is just too lackluster as 0-60 in 10.5 (or even just under 10 seconds) is just plain too slow for any car (let alone one with sport aspirations. Here a few quotes regarding the car: ‘as you run the engine out to redline, the noise is great, but not matched by much forward progress… There isn’t the low end torque you’d hope for from an electrically asissted drivetrain. So rather than being the expected party piece, the drivetrain is a little underwhelming”. As for the supposed outstanding handling, one reviewer, states,” but the CR-Z is far from the most agile small coupe around–a Mini or a BMW 1 series would leave it for dead n a twisting road.” I’m also wondering if there is something amiss with Honda’s claim that it delivers all of its torque at 1500 rpms as it would seem to me that the gasoline engine does not deliver its maximum torque until well past 1500 rpms and the electric motor does not deliver enough torque to make up the difference. It’s not a terrible car –its just that the performance falls far short of being outstanding in any particular area as it’s not all that frugal (the Ford Fiesta gets similar or better gas mileage without an expensive weight adding hybrid system), the powertrain is sadly lacking in power (as I could easily name well over a hundred cars plus that can do better 0-60 times (this includes minivans and many econoboxes (even the Fit is faster))and if it is priced in the $25,000-30,000 range it would be much too expensive for such dismal performance.

  • disappointed hondafan

    I for one find this car to be a total disappointment as it really shows Honda did little to make this car something special that would bring rave reviews from almost everyone. The powertrain is just too lackluster as 0-60 in 10.5 (or even just under 10 seconds) is just plain too slow for any car (let alone one with sport aspirations. Here a few quotes regarding the car: ‘as you run the engine out to redline, the noise is great, but not matched by much forward progress… There isn’t the low end torque you’d hope for from an electrically asissted drivetrain. So rather than being the expected party piece, the drivetrain is a little underwhelming”. As for the supposed outstanding handling, one reviewer, states,” but the CR-Z is far from the most agile small coupe around–a Mini or a BMW 1 series would leave it for dead n a twisting road.” I’m also wondering if there is something amiss with Honda’s claim that it delivers all of its torque at 1500 rpms as it would seem to me that the gasoline engine does not deliver its maximum torque until well past 1500 rpms and the electric motor does not deliver enough torque to make up the difference. It’s not a terrible car –its just that the performance falls far short of being outstanding in any particular area as it’s not all that frugal (the Ford Fiesta gets similar or better gas mileage without an expensive weight adding hybrid system), the powertrain is sadly lacking in power (as I could easily name well over a hundred cars plus that can do better 0-60 times (this includes minivans and many econoboxes (even the Fit is faster))and if it is priced in the $25,000-30,000 range it would be much too expensive for such dismal performance.

  • disappointed hondafan

    I for one find this car to be a total disappointment as it really shows Honda did little to make this car something special that would bring rave reviews from almost everyone. The powertrain is just too lackluster as 0-60 in 10.5 (or even just under 10 seconds) is just plain too slow for any car (let alone one with sport aspirations. Here a few quotes regarding the car: ‘as you run the engine out to redline, the noise is great, but not matched by much forward progress… There isn’t the low end torque you’d hope for from an electrically asissted drivetrain. So rather than being the expected party piece, the drivetrain is a little underwhelming”. As for the supposed outstanding handling, one reviewer, states,” but the CR-Z is far from the most agile small coupe around–a Mini or a BMW 1 series would leave it for dead n a twisting road.” I’m also wondering if there is something amiss with Honda’s claim that it delivers all of its torque at 1500 rpms as it would seem to me that the gasoline engine does not deliver its maximum torque until well past 1500 rpms and the electric motor does not deliver enough torque to make up the difference. It’s not a terrible car –its just that the performance falls far short of being outstanding in any particular area as it’s not all that frugal (the Ford Fiesta gets similar or better gas mileage without an expensive weight adding hybrid system), the powertrain is sadly lacking in power (as I could easily name well over a hundred cars plus that can do better 0-60 times (this includes minivans and many econoboxes (even the Fit is faster))and if it is priced in the $25,000-30,000 range it would be much too expensive for such dismal performance.

  • disappointed hondafan

    I for one find this car to be a total disappointment as it really shows Honda did little to make this car something special that would bring rave reviews from almost everyone. The powertrain is just too lackluster as 0-60 in 10.5 (or even just under 10 seconds) is just plain too slow for any car (let alone one with sport aspirations. Here a few quotes regarding the car: ‘as you run the engine out to redline, the noise is great, but not matched by much forward progress… There isn’t the low end torque you’d hope for from an electrically asissted drivetrain. So rather than being the expected party piece, the drivetrain is a little underwhelming”. As for the supposed outstanding handling, one reviewer, states,” but the CR-Z is far from the most agile small coupe around–a Mini or a BMW 1 series would leave it for dead n a twisting road.” I’m also wondering if there is something amiss with Honda’s claim that it delivers all of its torque at 1500 rpms as it would seem to me that the gasoline engine does not deliver its maximum torque until well past 1500 rpms and the electric motor does not deliver enough torque to make up the difference. It’s not a terrible car –its just that the performance falls far short of being outstanding in any particular area as it’s not all that frugal (the Ford Fiesta gets similar or better gas mileage without an expensive weight adding hybrid system), the powertrain is sadly lacking in power (as I could easily name well over a hundred cars plus that can do better 0-60 times (this includes minivans and many econoboxes (even the Fit is faster))and if it is priced in the $25,000-30,000 range it would be much too expensive for such dismal performance.

  • disappointed hondafan

    I for one find this car to be a total disappointment as it really shows Honda did little to make this car something special that would bring rave reviews from almost everyone. The powertrain is just too lackluster as 0-60 in 10.5 (or even just under 10 seconds) is just plain too slow for any car (let alone one with sport aspirations. Here a few quotes regarding the car: ‘as you run the engine out to redline, the noise is great, but not matched by much forward progress… There isn’t the low end torque you’d hope for from an electrically asissted drivetrain. So rather than being the expected party piece, the drivetrain is a little underwhelming”. As for the supposed outstanding handling, one reviewer, states,” but the CR-Z is far from the most agile small coupe around–a Mini or a BMW 1 series would leave it for dead n a twisting road.” I’m also wondering if there is something amiss with Honda’s claim that it delivers all of its torque at 1500 rpms as it would seem to me that the gasoline engine does not deliver its maximum torque until well past 1500 rpms and the electric motor does not deliver enough torque to make up the difference. It’s not a terrible car –its just that the performance falls far short of being outstanding in any particular area as it’s not all that frugal (the Ford Fiesta gets similar or better gas mileage without an expensive weight adding hybrid system), the powertrain is sadly lacking in power (as I could easily name well over a hundred cars plus that can do better 0-60 times (this includes minivans and many econoboxes (even the Fit is faster))and if it is priced in the $25,000-30,000 range it would be much too expensive for such dismal performance.

  • honda fan

    I take it you would agree that Honda should have offered other engine opitions (ie. gasoline only engines) and the failure to do so was to me major mistake by Honda. After all, if it had offered a gasoline only version it would have been much cheaper, lighter, and easier to modify to upgrade the powertrain.

  • Chisight

    I agree completely, my CRX got 55MPG back in the 80s, Why can’t Honda do at least as well almost 30 years later?

  • benjamin.bouten@telenet.be

    Check out the CR-Z Genuine accessories iPod application!
    Just type CR-Z in iTunes app store.
    It allows you to enhance your CR-Z with cool and high quality original Honda accessories.

  • Alexandre

    I suppose that what you’re saying is right, and I don’t own, and haven’t actually driven even an Insight, but it seems to me that Honda’s EPA Ratings are usually way lower than the real world estimates. For example, my friend has a 2008 Honda Accord EX with the Inline-4 engine, and it is EPA rated at 24 mpg combined driving. He commutes quite a bit everyday, both on the city and highway, and he rarely receives under 30 mpg when he fills up again. My other friend has a 2008 Honda Fit with the automatic and he, who drives mostly in the city and around suburban areas, commonly gets above 40 mpg, compared to the 28/34 that the EPA rated it to. Also, you have to take into consideration that the CR-Z has an ECO mode that will significantly improve efficiency. In case you don’t believe me, go ahead and read this article about the Insight’s EPA ratings compared to its real world mpg:

    http://www.mixedpower.com/honda-insight/2010-honda-insight-real-world-gas-mileage-far-exceeds-official-epa-ratings/

    I understand your point of view, but what I’m saying is that don’t let the EPA mpg prevent you from buying a car: I recently bought a 2006 Lexus LS430 (certified) that was rated at 18/25 EPA, and I’m getting about 20/32!

  • boilinabag

    this is the perfect replacement for my saturn sky roadster! does it have the sunroof like the proto? is there a sunroof option? a must have for so. cal.! i wish they would make it a hard top convertible.

  • Shinrock

    I got to test drive the CRZ today. Owning a Prius, I can tell you the CRZ has way more pick up, speed and handling. With tighter suspension, bigger tires and a sports mode, it boogies. The handling is tight and is a legitimate sports car feel. While the Prius gets better mileage, the CRZ is way funner to drive.

  • Tesoro

    I loved the CRX and this is just the next generation and a sweet ride but I have no interest in driving a hybrid.

  • Anonymous

    What civic do you have that gets 40mpg? I am not aware of one except for the hybrid.

  • Noah

    You could get a TDI. Then pay diesel prices, which are on par with premium gasoline. Or get a Prius. And all that money you saved will be right out the window when the batteries need to be replaced. Or when they decide to recall it. I think the problem you guys are having is seeing “Hybrid” and automatically assuming “MPG”. The hybrid part is designed to increase low-end torque in the vehicle, not to get that much better fuel economy. The CR-Z will outrun any Smart car out there, if it only does 90 mph. And I’m quite sure you can bring home enough groceries to last you a week in it, unlike the Smart car. The CR-Z also has a back seat, albeit a very uncomfortable looking one. Also, I’d like to see a company that advertises real-life fuel economy numbers. Not “this is the fuel economy when the vehicle is run at x mph on rollers inside a factory with no inclines and no wind resistance.” The original numbers released by Toyota for the Prius are nowhere near the actual ones. And the Insight gets great gas mileage. And is a nightmare on the Interstate.

  • DaveS1646

    I think I must have missed something. Projected to cost ~20-21K in EX trim and have 122 / 128 hp/torq and 31/34/37 mpg for manual, I don’t get why I’m buying a CR-Z instead of a Civic EX Coupe manual. I own an ’06 HCH so I don’t have an anti-Honda ax to grind. I just fail to understand how Honda’s trend to make the IMA motor and pack smaller and less capable is making a good contribution to the model line since the economy increment for all the added equipment has only gone down with the smaller IMA and less capable valve train in the Insight/CR-Z than the 2nd gen Civic got.
    Other than the more exclusive distribution/limited numbers initially and the look (?), I’ll take the Civic Coupe, have the back seat for my kids, and a greater reliability of the well established Civic line. Civic Couple has more hp and same torque, cost $1500 less and only about 10% less fuel economy.

    Honda is missing the boat up by minimizing the IMA system and motor economy modes in the newer models. Glad I got my HCH before they started messing it up. They might save in car build cost, but the value prospect of a Honda Hybrid vs conventional vehicle has certainly gotten worse for it.

  • repossessed cars

    Great looks indeed and definitely the right idea. There are a lot of eco-conscious young guys out there, who might even be willing to pay the price for this sort of vehicle, particularly now that it’s still a novelty. Now, the thing is they should definitely make it more powerful, especially for the US market.

  • Real Deal

    I was very skeptical of this new idea of a hybrid sports car from Honda. I am now a convert and want one for myself. I do happen to have an inside track being that I have been a Honda salesman for the last 4yrs and just came back from the training and unveiling session on the actual vehicle. I got to drive both the cvt and the 6spd manual. This is not a hybrid car, this is a car than can be turned into a hybrid with the push of a button. The 3 different mode choices are Normal, Sport, and the hybrid Econ mode. When not in Econ mode it is a civic that can be changed to sport mode where the electric motor actually will kick in a few extra horsepower like the old accord hybrid did. When driving as soon as you push the sport button the car lurches forward with the extra power. It is very fun to drive and I prefer the ride over my base Acura RSX. On paper it may seem under powered, but the vehicle itself already is light and has no back seat so is even lighter by about 400 pounds or so. We all know what honda engines are known for and that little car whipped around the slolum course tight and fast. And regarding the hybrid function, it is not a prius competitor but if you are in traffic it can be a huge fuel saver. And for the greenies it is an AT-PZEV (Advanced Technology-Partial Zero Emmissions Vehicle) meaning it almost has no readable emmissions at all.

  • Real Deal

    0-60 in just over 6seconds and the top end vehicle with navigation is not going to have an MSRP of $25k

  • calvin

    This car is guaranteed to be heavier and more powerful than a 1980s CRX, which is why MPG ratings on cars haven’t improved much over the years, even with hybrid technology. People just want bigger and more powerful cars these days.

    It’s like how our desire for more eye candy and quicker development cycles has caused the perceived speed of home PCs to be pretty much the same as they were in the 90s. So even though PCs have become way more powerful over the years, it’s taking more and more powerful computers just to run an OS + word processor & web browser.

    I like the look of the CR-Z, and it’s great that another hybrid is coming out, but it’s also disappointing that it’s not a plug-in. Perhaps Honda needs to do as Tesla is doing and build a $200,000 EV supercar to advance EV technology. Those who can afford to buy the $200,000 EV will help subsidize the development cost of cheaper EVs and plug-in hybrids.

    An EV racing formula would also pour more funding into EV/hybrid-electric R&D. Consumer vehicles have benefited greatly over the years from the fast-paced development and cutting-edge technology employed in Formula 1 racing. In addition to the technological innovations driven by competitive racing, an EV formula would also increase the popularity and change public perception of EVs and hybrids.

  • Pio of Sticks Comic

    Very true indeed! The Prius was a blatant ripoff of Honda’s original Insight.

    Too bad Honda bailed on the original Insight, instead of improving it and tweaking it more to the buyer’s wishes. That thing had AMAZING gas mileage!

    Did the original insight have a stick shift?

  • Anonymous

    Sorry, just visited Toyota’s site, the ‘Prius I’ was removed from its listing, and it should never be shown to retail customers as it’s supposed to be available for fleet sales only. It just looks like Toyota’s smoke screen.

  • Anonymous

    Where can I find the Fusion that you said can get “low 50′s” EPA rating???
    I think Ford’s engineers must be still working on it. LOL.

  • Anonymous

    Al W.,
    I’m afraid you’re mis-informed. A regular Ford Fiesta with A6 is only rated EPA 29/38/ 33 combined. Only a Ford Fiesta A6 with SFE pkg (i.e. the one that comes with skinny 15″ wheel and you actually get charged a premium for smaller-size tires, haha) is rated EPA 29/40/ 33 combined.
    Honda CR-Z is rated EPA 35/39/ 37 combined. In city cycle, regular Fiesta A6 gets 17% worse mileage; for combined mileage, regular Fiesta A6 is still 11% worse than CR-Z.
    Fiesta has ONLY 112 lb.ft. of torque, 16 lb.ft. short of a CR-Z with 6MT.
    Although Fiesta comes with four doors, with its rather inhospitable rear seats (I sat there), I won’t regret if I get a two seater instead.

  • Tom tom on wheels

    I just bought a CR-Z yesterday and I love it. I traded my accord coupe in for it and I am happy with my decision. It has an extreme amount of technology: blue tooth, navigation, ipod to name a few. I feel like I am driving a large cellphone. I have gotten a lot of road envy and I like that!

  • clint

    I also bought the honda crz the first day they could be sold here. It is an amazingly fun car! Great style and technology all around. I get 42 in the city with it too! BTW, the ford fiesta is a ridiculous looking car. Looks like a crumpled can. And honda makes a much better vehicle any day, hands down

  • Anonymous

    a few groups of people who don’t really belong to this discussion:
    - guys who needs 4+ seats for kids – go and buy a van. Don’t complain about 2 seats only, you don’t belong here. 2 seater is conscious decision for people who know what they really want.
    - people who complain about low horse power, torgue, and “slow” acceleration. If you’re really want a lot of power – buy a “real” today’s sport car for what – $50K+?
    - group complaining: cr-z has too “low MPG”. Stick with ugly Prius behemoth.

    CR-Z has specific (and probably not too small) target group. People who can say:

    1) I want 2 seater. I don’t give a dime for extra 5 seats for my imaginary car-poolers.
    As yourself – how many times in last 5 years you actually had more than 2 people in your car?
    Everybody is driving his own car, even when going to the same picnic. Top load: 2 people. period.

    2) I want sportish looking car, but not tiny Miata, or mini-cooper, or weird smart-for-two.
    why? because I just like cr-z shape better.

    3) I don’t really need pointless 600 horse power. where are you going to use those horses – on 405 freeway in rush hours? and why do I have to pay $50K for something that I don’t really use?

    4) I don’t mind to have a hybrid. it does keep my mpg lower that gasoline-only car.
    again – if you want super MPG – buy a prius. but prius is the same fun as driving a bus.
    I don’t give a dime about a few MPG less. Although my personal experience says that all these MPGs are huge subject to personal driving habits.

    5) I like manual shift. why? just because I like it. 6-gears? can’t wish for better.

    So, summary: 2 seater, good looking sportish shape, manual 6 gear, hybrid inside with nice acceptable mpg, and price tag 20K. show me a car that HAS IT ALL TOGETHER !

  • CrzTuners

    I think the Honda CRZ is going to be a huge hit. If you are interested in more info on the CRZ, check out http://www.CRZTuners.com !

  • Armand

    Then don’t buy it.

    It’s more than quick enough for everyday driving. It looks good, has top notch quality, is more than practical for most people if they actually change their stupid mentality, and already has reported owners getting mid 40′s in MPG and higher.

    It’s an option for people who want a hybrid but don’t want what’s already out there.

    If you don’t get it, don’t buy it.

  • Joe Smo

    Prius territory? I think being 5-8K away from a price tag of a prius doesnt put you in the territory. Still about 20% away from that price. Not to mention that with the Econ mode on the CR-Z you may beable to reach 60 MPG… Plus the CR-Z is much more fun to drive and better looking. If you want that $15K car maybe you should look at a Chevy.

  • CrzTuners
  • M.G.

    @Al W,
    Your not even credible in 1988 either, you cant even wrap your mind around the concept that its a HYBRID, so it not just 120hp, that # was for the GAS ENGINE ONLY. You still need to add in the assistance of the electric motor (which is both hp and a ton of torque!) Stop talking about how “not enthusiastic/entertaining/…” it is when you havent even driven it yet, dont open your mouth about that untill yourve put your pessimistic butt in the car and driven it- you dont know anything about it yet!

  • tim lynch

    I have a 2002 Honda Insight, first generation, I was exited about a new two seater with a maunal transmission the CR-Z, But the millage is disapointing, I get real world 65-70 mpg with my old insight, Honda just gave me a new batteri at 150K, (which was a great deal for me, thank you Honda) So I’ll just keep my old insight a wile longer, Honda, hear us! we need this same CR-Z with better that 50 mpg, you did it once, why not now? Still my old insight has been great I drive 600 miles a week and it just keep going and going, I do all my own work and oil changes. Honda has treated me very well on this car, I really want to buy another Honda. Maybe the next generation Insight, Until then, I’ll just keep the one I have

  • bill burt

    I went down on Day 1 to see this new car…I’ve been aware of it for sometime, but wanted to see the physical product. It was very nice to look at and I liked the cabin. What I don’t understand and what nobody here seems to understand, is how this very aerodynamic car can do very little better, mileage wise, than my new Fit. I had already seen the numbers, so I wasn’t taken back, but still, I am not sure this is a car to be taken seriously. I love the Fit, but I feel this car is somehow wrong from the git go. My honest feeling is, “Geeze Honda, you did such a great job withmy car….What happened here?”

  • David

    I bought the CR-Z EX 6MT on 9/4 and have been blowing away the EPA numbers. This morning on my way to work I got 52.5 MPG in ECO mode. When in normal or sport I can still get over 40. The car is awesome and handles like a dream. All of you that are critical should test it yourself before drawing conclusions. The car is amazing.

  • George M.

    OK, the car is on the dealers lots now and it looks pretty cool. Reminiscent of my 1988 CRX SI. The CR-Z has a combined horsepower of 122 with 13 of that being provided by the electric motor powered by a 100 volt 5.5 AH battery. No, this isn’t meant to be compared to the Prius but, then again, it is bound to happen anyway. Something to think about is when the Prius battery system dies (for whatever reason) and you’re left with only engine power, the small and relatively weak Toyota will be at a big disadvantage compared to the same thing happening in the Honda. A friend has a Prius and was in San Francisco with four adults int he car. On one hill she stopped for traffic and was unable to move uphill again when needed. Apparently, not enough battery power remained to drive the motor and the engine didn’t have enough power to do the job. Not what you want to find out when you’re 200 miles from home. Someone mentioned making a hybrid diesel. Honda developed a diesel hybrid a couple of years ago, again, on the CRX body theme. It was reported to get around 86 MPG and was anticipated to be released in 2010 but with the softening of the U.S. small car diesel market, Honda cancelled the project, much to our loss. In other parts of the world you could buy an Accord diesel but it isn’t/wasn’t a hybrid. Yes, this CR-Z is a little pricey but only time will tell if this car will have the typical Honda reputation for reliability. I’ve owned eleven Honda/Acura vehicles and they have all been excellent. I would expect this new car to be the same. Honda and Toyota have always been a notch up on their pricing but they sell lots of cars anyway so why is anyone suprised with a CR-Z EX hybrid w/navigation going for $24,000? This is a “sports” hybrid, not a maximum MPG hybrid. Honda had the first production hybrid car on the road (the original Insight) and then stopped production. Toyota came out with the Prius afterwards and by that time Honda had different aspirations.

  • Shane Huey

    Well, that’s something we can continue to hope for. Up to this point, I haven’t encountered any hybrid vehicle being offered at a price below $20k.

  • Shane

    Many of them do. My father has a 95 Civic LX Sedan 5-speed that gets 44 mpg on the highway all day long. Even my brother’s 95 Civic EX Auto can get like 42 mph hwy.

  • Motza

    I went down to my local Honda dealer this weekend to check out the CR-Z (aka… 122 Z. after I purchase one)

    Loved the product, I didn’t test drive yet, got there to late in the day. However I was really surprised by the lack of one very important upgrade… where is the optional “SUN ROOF” or at least a T-Top.

    Anyone agree with me?

    You can through in the optional hybrid turbo-diesel too!

  • motza

    none

  • bill zimmer

    Wow this would be a bad ass car if it was superchargd and had.300 horse power keep you’re. Fuel mpg and give me power I love my accura tl 19.5 avg and 278 horses yea.

  • James B

    I recently bought a cr-z and love it. Cost about 23,000. Handles like a sports car and is very roomy for small car. Got it right off the truck only had 5 miles on it. Had a hummer and a corvette, traded both for a cr-v and a cr-z. Both vehicles get good gas miliage and the cr-v has lots of room, fully loaded, at 30,000.

  • toolboxer

    My wife comutes 60 miles per day and has been driving her 94 civic to the tune of 211,000. We have seen many cars that have over 40 mpg but the styling is always butt-ugly. Went for a test drive yesterday in a manual shift crz. For us, the styling hit all the right notes, combined with the manual shift and actual milage in the 45mpg range with the econ mode engaged.
    Granted the fit and prius will get better millage but who wants to be seen in either of those cars?
    Long story short, bought the crz with the manual transmission, out the door for under 20k. Do not have any real world milage numbers to post yet, but will post that as soon as we have a real world average. Yes, it is a little pokey in econ mode, but if its power you need, switch to sport mode and it perks up and is very peppy. Ride quality is very suprising and the fit and finish is very good.
    P.S.,…I feel that I should mention that the only reason the price for us was under 20k is because we live in a state with no sales tax. Also, registration cost is 77 dollars per year, so up yours California!!!

  • Tom K

    I bought one 8/28/10. Like it, plenty of Pep even in Normal Mode, lots of Pep in Sport Mode.
    I generally drive in Normal Mode and am getting 38.5 mpg.
    I get tons of comments at red-lights and when I’m getting out of it at convenience stores. People love the way it looks!
    It has a few very minor design flaws but hardly worth mentioning….. but guess I will. i.e.
    You can’t drive with either window down at all if the car is wet, water pours into the passenger compartment, there are no window gutters to make water roll off the back of the car.
    The top to the compartments behind the seats should be split in two, it’s too difficult to raise when the lid when it’s closed.
    It rides a bit rough becasue the electric motor and battery are so heavy, feels like you have 1000 lbs of bricks in the trunk.
    Other than that, luv it! Fun and 38.5 mpg and looks HOT ! Hope it holds up!

  • yuriart10

    I think that this is a very awesome car.

    __________________
    Watch My Soul To Take Online Free

  • ryanb

    alright Al W fords SUCK honda is a way better car manufacturer then ford do some research. keep your opinions to yourself especially when your opinion is wrong and your basing the better car off looks, learn something about cars then come back and make a commen.

  • Tom

    Oh…boy! Watch out! What a buzz kill. A car that looks that slick just to put out 122hp? Whats that like 0-60 in like oh crap I just got rear-ended by a semi seconds?

    If your going to make a car that looks like a next generation sports car put a real engine in it that gets well over 200hp. How embarrassing!

  • guy

    THIS CAR SUCKS! GET A REAL CAR!!!

  • Anonymous

    I would LOVE to buy this car–but–it has no back seat. With a 10 month old, I need a place for the car seat. Honda released this car in Europe and Japan with a back seat just so sporty minded parents could have a place to put the baby. I suppose they expect American parents to drive minivans. I’ll keep waiting . . .

  • Peter

    I’ve been looking forward to this car since the prototype. I own a 2002 S2000 which even with my lead foot gets 24MPG and does 0-60 in about 6 secs. After reading several reviews, I can’t think of any reason to trade that for a CR-Z. It would not have been that hard for them to put a more powerful package in here and make it really fun – Porsche has a hybrid 911 and that would be the only competition. I would not be caught dead in a Prius, they are the ugliest car since the Pontiac Aztec, and only uber-treehuggers drive them in the mistaken belief that they’re saving the planet but really the batteries have several toxic and hard to find materials that are most cheaply mined in an eastern communist country. I think the original concept was good, but as usual it gets watered down during the process while they try to make the car suitable for a broader audience. If this car had less weight, more power and better gas mileage, it would be a no-brainer. As for what it has become at this point… meh….

  • Bill

    Drove the car today for a test drive. I am 6-2 , 245, athletic. The car had plenty of room for me. Not a Corvette but faster then I thought. Drives like a larger car but is definitely sporty and great handling. I like it’s looks. Only negative comments the tires are too small, and wheels need to have some good options by Honda.
    The a/c was blowing very cold and the sound coming from the rear when in sport mode sounded pretty good for stock…over all its a great look great handling and those that don’t like it great don’t buy it ..My wife has a CTS Cad V-8 and I drive a GMC Yukon so this will be our fun car..and pretty good mileage car..

  • Tony

    Well, i saw one zig zaging down the highway…looked cool but and it sort of makes an impression. Now I drive a vette, but the Honda is a neat little package and don’t expect much in the power and speed category. AND the first think I would do it put an antigreen sticker on the back. Green dosen’t even count for me in this.

  • Jordan

    I just bought one a week ago and I LOVE IT! I traded in my Lexus IS250 for it. I drove it for the first time and fell in love. I did test drive a prius but being a 24 year old girl and young professional, I didn’t want some old hybrid looking car. ( No offense to the Prius Lovers) The CRZ is going to fit a certain type of consumer. Not for everyone. But for this lady right here its exactly what I wanted. Something small but with space to put plenty of shopping bags or tables for poker night. Works great for parking in Houston and has great style. The built in NAV and it only costs me $22 to fill the tank…. I can’t really complain. I drive 60 miles a day and I love every minute of it. Not every car is going to have everything, its the fact that it makes you smile when you get it… and trust me the sport mode will put a naughty smile on your face!

  • William

    I purchased mine a CRZ CVT w/nav silver storm color about a month ago. Coming from a long line all my life of Porsches including one I raced..amateur. JUst in the last month their are plenty of upgrade mod coming on line if you care to indulge. I like the car just tuye way it is ..I added 17 inch wheels and wide tires.. I wil also upgrade the suspension shortly other then that its a great car.. for thoise that don’t like it DON’T BUY IT>>as far as milegae in econ I get close to 47 MPG on freeway and at least 42 in city in regular a little less and in sporty I drive like my Porsche using the paddles and gettuing about 38-40mpg. Its quick runs great ..warr for 8 years or 100k miles complete coverage. OK can’t beat my Porsche straight on but at 22,000 out the door and no upkeep and mileage to boot I love it .. I have a Cad CTS V8 and this car is more fun and more economical.. ask any owner if they like it .. and I no longer need the over all HP ..this one is quick enough .. especially with the paddles.. by the way I made my living for over 300 years driving fast on freeways and roads chasing down speeders so I know alittel about speed and handling ..wen through many high speed driving school s..lastly they justran two of these cars stock at Willow Springs and one crashed and one came in second place not bad ..and with 16 inch wheels and stock tires wait till they put on some racers and add 17 inch ..

  • William

    Well…I apoligize ..that’s what I get for hurrying… I mistyped a few errors ..corrections please..

    …just the way it is ….
    ..as far as mileage…
    …and getting about …
    …made my living for over 30 years …not 300 years although it felt at times like 300 years…

    Sorry again for the typos … I really love the negative comments by some who have never sat in one nor seen the car nor experienced driving it .. and I suppose they know much more then me about racing and handling .. this car is a winner ..

  • Ed Valenci

    I blew up the top of my Toyota MR2 SC and I started to use my wife’s and daughter’s Priuses and I see the big difference, It was so boring but that canceled out by giving me 45 MPG, I loved the two seater and its quickness but i put so much gas in it to save money to get a new one so I decided to get CR-Z blue pearl 7mt. Its not turbo or supercharged but handles like sports car, feels solid and firm. I get 39 and 43MPG and drives like the expensive ones, If only they will slap in 1.8 liter and 3x size electric motor, no ones going to laugh but for now, this is my baby, much nicer than Prius or my Mr2 SC! But probably no more MPGs saving!

  • Ed Valenci

    I blew up the top of my Toyota MR2 SC and I started to use my wife’s and daughter’s Priuses and I see the big difference, It was so boring but that canceled out by giving me 45 MPG, I loved the two seater and its quickness but i put so much gas in it. So I decided to get a new CR-Z blue pearl 7mt. Its not turbo or supercharged but handles like sports car, feels solid and firm. I get 39 and 43MPG and drives like the expensive ones, If only they will slap in 1.8 liter and 3x size electric motor, no ones going to laugh but for now, this is my baby, much nicer than Prius or my Mr2 SC! But probably no more MPGs saving!

  • Gary

    My truck gets 16mpg so i think this car gets great mileage

  • JohnnyO

    Just bought a CR-Z a couple of weeks ago. What a blast to drive! It handles great, not a rocket in acceleration but it is peppy enough to get up to interstate speeds off the ramps with no strain. I’m getting 32mpg city and got 36mpg on the highway. I am not a kid I am 59 but driving this car makes me feel 29! It turns heads and gets a lot of attention in parking lots. It is a far cry from the mid-sized suv I traded for it. That was getting 13 to 16 mpg. Honda designed this car for the looks, gas mileage and to be fun to drive. Is it a true sports car? Depends on what your definition of a “sports car” is. Handling wise it is, acceleration wise not so much, but it is not designed for rapid acceleration but fun to drive. So far I haven’t found anything I don’t like about this car.

  • TJ

    wow… just 876 sold in month of December which is 14% drop in sales while most other hybrids have gained double digit including prius at 50%. Not looking good. At this rate, they will barely sell 10,000 a year which is far short of 40 to 50K Honda projected. I don’t see this car lasting long… I already see a redesign or replacement coming soon.

  • Gregg

    The Prius is a SLUG and gets WORSE mileage than my wifes Honda insight I have gotten 61 mpg in that car and always gets 500 miles of more on about 9.5 gallons of gas. IN THE REAL WORLD..The new Insight SPANKS the crap out of the Prius in mileage and performance. KEEP LIVING IN THE WHAT YOU READ WORLD rather than the real world. My daughters 2007 Honda FIT gets 42 mpg on the highway allll the time..it cost 16k new for the fully loaded sport model. I think that is better mpg than the Prius

    The only thing that Honda has admitted is that they are the MOST reliable car company on the planet. They also admit that Toyota has the most and LARGEST number of RECALLS of vehicles out of ANY Japanese manufacturer. They are just behind FORD now.

    I bought a 2011 CRZ for 19600 with a 6 speed manual. I have gotten 46pmg at best so far with my now 2k miles. I ALWAYs blow past EVERY prius I have seen as I hit 105 mph in 4 gear with 2 more to go. IF you EVER catch up with the INCREDIBLE Prius. I will buy the drink of your choice. My assumption is DONT mess with a HONDA or Insight. and YOU can wave as a CRZ blows by you and disappears into the sunset, WITH A HOT YOUNG babe who was just drooling all over the car at the local street meet.

  • Charles D. Lopez

    My Wife and I just purchased a CR-Z hybrid.
    We got 41.5 mpg with our first tank of gas.
    I think that it will do better after we get use to it.
    The car is easy to park and has good visibillity.
    We traded in a eclipse which was more powerful but
    It had too many blind spots.
    The CR-Z is not only easy to drive it has room to haul luggage ect.
    We are driving on Oahu so you do not have anywhere where you can drive over 80mph for any time.
    When we use to live in the mainland I use to drive my vet over 100mph in Montana.Nevada and parts of Washington.
    With the traffic we have now you have to be a nut to drive fast. The only thing your going to do is test out the air bags.

  • Dennis R. Jones

    I just test drove a 2011 Honda CR-Z (EX, 6 speed) for the second time. Suffice to say it’s a blast to drive – pure fun with a feeling of panache akin to other li’l sporty cars like today’s Mini-Cooper or Mazda MX-5. Somehow the CR-Z felt roomier- more comfortable and more substantial being conveniently laid as a 2 seater with plenty of useable back deck space and added low center of gravity (Ni-Cad battery pac) which added crisp handling- but with no jitters on windier roads yet cruises smooth and quiet at US touring speeds.

    A PEV or partial (hi-bred) electric vehicle, the CR-Z bares little resemblance to it’s heavy-slow 2 door, PEV predecessor or even current cousins, Toyota’s sedate Prius PEV sedan or nissan’s All Electric, plug in Leaf… or huge, by comparison, Chevy Volt (a fine 4 door, family sedan that features long range OR plug in re-charged electric technology but at prices close to double the CR-Z’s of $22k).

    Honda fans, Mazda 3 fans too will find similarities to the CR-X/Mazda rally cars of the 80′s- refined to 21th Century eco-commuting, sport driving and eco touring.

    If you love to drive & always strive to “enjoy the eco-trip in style” test drive a honda CR-Z. sporty coupe.
    If you must wait for the future look for a used CR-Z in a few years or if I’m reading my oriental tea leaves right, maybe a reintroduced/recharged Insight / CR-Z with lighter-hotter Lithium Battery & short range home over-nite / quick charge at stations (coming soon along NW US Hwy 5 if not WA state Hwy 9, 20 & that scenic by-way you know near you where yo be-come one with what surrounds you.
    dJ360

  • Pratik Naik

    Though purists may be hard-pressed to call it a true sports car, the two-seat Honda CR-Z is the sportiest hybrid to hit the road in 2011. With a heritage that includes the Honda CR-X Si pocket rocket and ground-breaking Insight hybrid, the CR-Z has a twisty path to follow. While it’s not as fast as the CR-X Si nor as remarkably fuel-efficient as the original Insight, the CR-Z hybrid is an entertaining ride when equipped with the six-speed manual transmission. If you like to run through the gears and must have a hybrid, the CR-Z is the only game in town.

    http://www.bestmotorfinder.com/

  • Duane

    I have both generations of the Insight and this is a lot like my 2000 insight but sportier. I test drove the CRZ and fell in love with it.
    I drive 100 miles a day, fuel economy is a must in this economy
    I look forward to getting one as soon as possible.

  • raul jr

    Amazing car seen heard drove n bought yes it does get the high 40′s in eco mode sport mode still low 40′s already have performance parts haha turns head like a mother f#*?+% sure may not be quick yet but k swap comin as soon as the warrinty is out its already been done n its a beast

  • Bill G.

    Just bought a CR-Z to commute 100 miles round trip. So far I have no regrets. Fun to drive. Excellent fuel economy. About 40 MPG, give or take 3 or 4 depending on traffic and AC use. Hope the resale value holds up like the other Honda models. Most people here seem to be opinionated about which car is best. I suggest before they comment, they need to at least drive or talk to some one who owns one.

  • carguy

    The fact that the CR-Z scored so poorly in the latest crash tests (only 3 stars over all and only 2 stars for the side passenger) along with its poor rear visibility would be a deal breaker for me (This car has really very little going for it is slow and underpowered and poor handling (yes it handles well when compared to a Prius —but that really isn’t saying much).

  • Papalazzo

    I bought the CRZ in August 2010, and I am completely satisfied with the car. Honda found a way to make a hybrid fun to drive, with just enough power and just enough fuel efficiency to make me a believer. The hatch holds a ton of things and the upgraded sound system is kick *ss. Every where I go someone ask’s me about the car. Honda took a chance, like they always do, and hit the mark. Now lets see if they bring the Prelude back as a hybrid!!

  • Mohsunny

    I ve bought honda TypeR2010 in Red color here in United Arab Emirates (Dubai) and its realy nice car but today some1 told me that CR-Z is arrived in the market so am sercing abut the car caz as of now i love TypeR amazing shape and power :)

  • Stephen

    Keep in mind that it’s the sticker price of the top of the line model that hits $23K. I just bought a base model, and I negotiated a discount from the sticker, so I paid closer to $18K. With the huge fun-to-drive factor that this car has plus the fuel economy, I felt like that was a very fair price.

  • Liz Huddleston

    I have I have been dicussing with a sales rep .@ a lot in Louisville Ky. where I purchased my Honda Element in 2008 .And a Honda CR- Z 2011 EX $ 18.5

  • Kelley

    UMMMMM..i have a crz and i get 0-60 in less than 9.whatever seconds..whoever did those runs cant drive a stick…its equal torque/hp ratio makes it launch very quick. and i get about 50 hwy…idk how one would get 39..unless your going like 80

  • Dave Mont

    i am having same issue with the water pouring through and gets onto the automatic lock and window buttons. did u find out how to fix this issue? im going to the dealer to check it out, but i am not sure what they can do. other than this no problems with the car at all.

  • Eric Von Zipper

    I’ve had a fully loaded CR-Z for one year exactly and I am totally in love with this car. My previous two cars were a 350 Z Nissan convertible and before that, a BMW Z3. The CR-Z is the best overall combination of performance, economy, style and fun of the three. It ahs more storage in the hatchback area than the other two, and the sport option button will move you out smartly in speed. I can’t believe there aren’t more on the road but that maintains the many admiring glances I still get. Don’t be surprised if someone wants to take your picture with it. This is one car I have a feeling I will be keeping for a long time…it suits me perfectly. Thank you, Honda!

  • Butt Fuck

    Suck me off.

  • diana baez

    I myself own this beautiful car!!! & i think is great !!!

  • Mr. C

    The CR-Z looked cool as a concept car. In final production it looks to much like the old CRX. The Insight and Prius look funny like little eggs. I don’t see why Honda can’t make a EV or Hybrid look normal like the 2012 Civic. I want an all electric Honda already!! Something like the Flex Calrity looking, maybe.

    I’m a true Honda fan and will never buy any other manufacturer! We’re like living in the stone age with all of these cars that struggle to get 40mpg… WTF.. Where’s my Civic/NSK looking all electric Honda already??.. stop showing me the Egg shape cars and don’t try to make it look different by covering the rears wheels with some covers. It’s 2011 almost 2012 no car should be selling that runs at below 40mpg!! My Civic get 31.5mpg.. why would I buy something that is barely an improvement, looks like an egg, and costs $10K more..

  • VeganRabbit

    I have a 2011 Honda CR-Z EX NAVI and it is AWESOME! I get an average (combined city and highway) of 43.7 mpg. I have never spent more than $33 to fill up my tank. It cost me $24,500 (fully loaded) and when I turn on sport mode I leave all those road hogs and sunday drivers in the dust. It’s great when someone cuts you off, you just turn on sport mode and zoom past them. It’s like a bullet! I can fit into any size parking space, which makes it great when squeezing in to parallel park much closer to whatever venue I need to get to, saving me time and energy. Don’t forget that it is one sexy car. I’ve caught people stopping and looking at my car while it’s parked – people have even taken pictures of it (sometimes even while they are driving)! It’s a perfect mixture of feminine and masculine – and truly unique.

    As for the absense of a backseat: who gives a sh*t? I have absolutely no need for a backseat. I drove a 2003 Chevy Astrovan for 4 years and only used the back seats for the first year or so. After that I would find myself looking back there wishing my car was shorter, lighter and didn’t have crap in it that I never used. The CR-Z has plenty of space in the back for whatever groceries or shopping bags you might want to fit back there – more space than I know what to do with, that’s for sure.

    I give the CR-Z two thumbs wayyyy up. This car is truly the BEST hybrid on the market today. The prius is laaaaaame. Any “earth friendly” car with a LEATHER interior option is clearly not really earth friendly. The CR-Z has an imitation leather-wrapped stearing wheel which feels better and lasts longer and also doesn’t destroy the environment the way leather production does (as well as the lives of the workers in leather tanneries – and of course, the lives of animals). Plus the prius looks like a total MOM CAR. I’m 23 years old – I want to look GOOD in my car. I LOVE MY CR-Z!

  • VeganRabbit

    I have a 2011 Honda CR-Z EX NAVI and it is AWESOME! I get an average (combined city and highway) of 43.7 mpg. I have never spent more than $33 to fill up my tank. It cost me $24,500 (fully loaded) and when I turn on sport mode I leave all those road hogs and sunday drivers in the dust. It’s great when someone cuts you off, you just turn on sport mode and zoom past them. It’s like a bullet! I can fit into any size parking space, which makes it great when squeezing in to parallel park much closer to whatever venue I need to get to, saving me time and energy. Don’t forget that it is one sexy car. I’ve caught people stopping and looking at my car while it’s parked – people have even taken pictures of it (sometimes even while they are driving)! It’s a perfect mixture of feminine and masculine – and truly unique.

    As for the absense of a backseat: who gives a sh*t? I have absolutely no need for a backseat. I drove a 2003 Chevy Astrovan for 4 years and only used the back seats for the first year or so. After that I would find myself looking back there wishing my car was shorter, lighter and didn’t have crap in it that I never used. The CR-Z has plenty of space in the back for whatever groceries or shopping bags you might want to fit back there – more space than I know what to do with, that’s for sure.

    I give the CR-Z two thumbs wayyyy up. This car is truly the BEST hybrid on the market today. The prius is laaaaaame. Any “earth friendly” car with a LEATHER interior option is clearly not really earth friendly. The CR-Z has an imitation leather-wrapped stearing wheel which feels better and lasts longer and also doesn’t destroy the environment the way leather production does (as well as the lives of the workers in leather tanneries – and of course, the lives of animals). Plus the prius looks like a total MOM CAR. I’m 23 years old – I want to look GOOD in my car. I LOVE MY CR-Z!

  • Anonymous

    This car is amazing! There’s only one thing I don’t like, that it doesnt come with leather

  • Anonymous

    I wouldn’t expect much out of this car. Much like the insight, honda tends to bring a new market to the US, just so that other companies can perfect it. The insight, for example, was the first hybrid sold in America, but the Prius soon dominated the hybrid market. I’d wait for another car company to create a much better hybrid sports car within the next few years.

  • The Judge

    This car is the epitome of compromise. It gets good, but not great gas mileage; it is sporty but is not by any means a Tesla Roadster; it is a 2-seater which therefore begs the issue of twice a year or so when someone with no minor children has actual use for a back seat. I am torn between this car and a Lexus CT Hybrid; which costs another 8 Gs but has better mileage, more power, a back seat and assorted amenities. Only time will tell.

  • Anonymous

    ampf….
    Gusto ko sanang malaman kung ilang araw o ilang oras ba ginaga wa ang inyung produkto,?its because i like the pain tof your car its more attractive to look.,but i just dont mid it necause i have search’n for the quality of the best car?

  • Jezreel

    ampf….
    Gusto ko sanang malaman kung ilang araw o ilang oras ba ginaga wa ang inyung produkto,?its because i like the pain tof your car its more attractive to look.,but i just dont mid it necause i have search’n for the quality of the best car?

  • Anonymous

    Next month comes Toyota Prius C with 51 MPG and prices at 19K.
    It will take sales from CR-Z

  • Patrick Flynn, Jr.

    If people would drive the car, and I suggest the six speed manual, then they would love the car like I do.
    To see or hear from others who are fond of their ride and to find out more about the CR-Z, go to: http://www.crzforum.com/index.php

  • Anonymous

    awesome

  • phunsuk

    The Honda CR-Z is a compact hybrid electric automobile manufactured by Honda and marketed as a “sport hybrid coupe”

    Dune Buggy

  • tapra1

    fuel and the car operates briefly on electric power only, but the engine’s parts still move. Like other hybrid vehicles, the CR-Z shuts off the engine when the car comes to a stop,Calmsa

  • Anonymous

    gh

  • nutrition

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  • Eduardo Donald

    The hybrid car is looking so aggressive, the outer side of the car is really so attractive. The hybrid car has well engine and fuel efficiency .Also it has well speed. I like it too much. Thank you so much for you nice share.

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  • BusterMcDermott

    I believe Honda CR-Z Hybrid is manageable. If you want a car with not more than 35mpg, try to take a look at this site. http://www.ranker.com/list/sporty-cars-with-good-gas-mileage/car-lists

  • Wooden brochure holders

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  • Anonymous

    I love my CRZ! I get 42.5 mpg and it’s zippy and fun and looks a hell of a lot better than a Prius!

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  • Anonymous

    ummmmmm got to own one to see what the true Miles Per Gallon is….find it most definitely ISN”T what they say it should be….As it gets more mileage it becomes MUCH LESS efficient on gas mileage…..

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  • Bob The Guitarist

    The 2013 Nissan Sentra gets 40 mpg on the highway and has 4 doors. Honda really couldn’t make this thing get 60 or 70 mpg? Come on!

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  • ted

    yes but my Prius is getting over 60 mpg, can be camped in, carry a full size wheelbarrow inside, carry my Kayak inside, can be used as a portable 12 volt generator, and can carry 5 people in a crunch. I do like the looks of the CRZ however.

  • home design

    This particular automobile is the epitome of compromise. It receives good, although not excellent fuel useage; it can be fantastic but is not at all any Tesla Roadster; this is a 2-seater which in turn as a result begs the situation involving twice a year or so whenever somebody without having minimal children provides actual make use of for a back seat. kitchen design ideas for small kitchens I’m split between this specific auto and a Rolls royce CT Hybrid; that amounted to an additional 8-10 Gs yet features greater usage, far more energy, any again couch along with assorted services. Can be.

  • Jean

    I love my CRZ! I have been driving it for two years now and I LOVE it! It’s fun and it handles well at all speeds. I do wish it got better gas mileage, but it is a lot more fun to drive than my Insight (the two seater) and I like the way it looks too.

  • Walter

    I agree with Anonymous that posted a comment 17 weeks ago. I get 42.5 mpg and have a 40 mile trip to work every day. Now I don’t know about better than a Prius, because I never owned one. My CRZ is zippy and fun.