Ghosn: CO2 Limits and New Tech Poised To Make EVs Mainstream Viable

Having previously said affordable technology is coming into place for double-the-range-for-the-money EVs, Nissan CEO Carlos Ghosn says the UN’s global climate change summit in Paris this November will also determine pressure for the zero-emission cars.

“When we know exactly where the EU, US, China will be heading in 2030, I can tell you exactly how much electric cars will be needed,” said Ghosn in a recent interview with the Guardian.

The UN summit will host government representatives from 190 nations in an attempt to set limits due to run out in 2020. Assuming an agreement is made, they are expected to set the tone for the following decade and possibly longer, and this, says Ghosn will play a role in EVs’ viability.

SEE ALSO: How Nissan and Renault are Dominating the Electric Car Game

The head of the company now responsible for selling half of all EVs in the world is however reluctant to be as bullish in making predictions as he was a few years ago.

Early Renault-Nissan goals of 1.5 million cars by 2016 and 1 million in the U.S. set by 2015 by President Barack Obama proved optimistic, but unchanged is climate warming and that today transportation accounts for 23 percent of global greenhouse gas emissions.

The automaker has already said it has a test mule Leaf easily capable of 250 miles range with a battery chemistry that charges faster, and costs little enough to replace today’s 84-mile Leaf for around the same price.

SEE ALSO: Nissan Testing 250-Plus-Mile Range Leaf Mule With New Battery Chemistry

Other cost issues are determined by scale, said Ghosn to the Guardian.

“This is a scale problem,” said Ghosn. “The technology fundamentally has nothing expensive. If you come to the basic physics of an electric car, it is not supposed to be more expensive than a combustion engine.”

Government incentives will still be needed, he said, as will more charging stations if markets are expected to blossom.

Otherwise, the EV protagonist who has put his name on the line more than any other head of a major automaker, is addressing key concerns critics have levied against EVs – namely, price, range, and recharge time.

Ghosn is aiming for a no-excuses solution the mainstream buyer will embrace, and not just for those happy to adjust their lifestyle to accommodate first-generation EVs.