Fuel Cell Vehicles Proliferating in Motorsports

At this year’s 24 Hours of Le Mans, a hydrogen fuel cell car will make the starting grid. The GreenGT H2 sports racer aims to showcase the viability of fuel cell technology in the upper echelons of motorsport and could pave the way for others in the near future. The H2 sports twin electric motors that draw energy from a single fuel cell and enable it to generate 540 horsepower. As a result, it ranks as one of the most powerful fuel cell vehicles constructed to date.

Fuel cell technology, despite facing hurdles toward widespread acceptance, namely infrastructure challenges, has been actively pursued by several automakers, notably Mercedes-Benz and Honda, though mostly, it’s being aimed at passenger car and commercial vehicle use. Until now, alternative fuel in motorsports has largely been confined to clean diesel, hybrid and EVs.

Besides competing at LeMans, GreenGT will be showcasing the H2 at the FIA World Endurance Championship race that takes place at Silverstone, UK, in August.


  • dutchinchicago

    What is the point of this? Hydrogen Fuel Cells will never make it to the mass market. There is no efficient way to produce hydrogen, we can’t store it and there is no distribution infrastructure for it. This is just a diversion to keep us from working on real solutions and keep us on oil longer.

  • David

    Nope. No way to make hydrogen.

    It’s impossible to get it via electrolysis.

    And that electricity to break it apart couldn’t ever be generated by solar or wind or even nuclear.

    Nope. Impossible.

  • brentil

    Yes, just because you don’t know of a economical way to do it now we should just give up…

    I’d like to point out that GM has a very long running Fuel Cell system that has done more to advance technology and rare metal displacement than the other 2 companies combined.

  • guy

    I am not concern by the production of hydrogen even if we do not have a cheap process available.
    but the dangerous of this gas which is highly explosif ; all human error should be terrible