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  1. #121
    Guest

    I have rented many different

    I have rented many different car models for business travel and have had this headrest problem with most of them. Like many of the writers, I like to sit up straight with my back against the seat for support. Since I'm 5'6", itis not possible with these projecting headrests, which hit square in the back of my head and push it forward.

    So how is the headrest supposed to support and protect you? It hits me in a much different spot than it would hit a 6'+ person, and there is generally not enough height adjustment to put it in the same relative position or to make it comfortable.


    It did not occur with my 96 Civic because the headrest was flat, but I just bought a new Toyota and see I will now have the problem.

    Are there any after-market replacements available? I don't like the idea of bending it, and turning it around is definitiely not safe. Otherwise, was 2007 the year they started this insanity? Maybe I can find an older one that fits?




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  3. #122
    Guest

    I have the same problem. I

    I have the same problem. I bought a 2011 Honda Fit last weekend and just love it EXCEPT for the headrests. I too, didn't notice the problem until the next day. I've had bad neck and shoulder pain all week. Last night I made myself a little custom pillow (about 1 1/2 thick with batting) for the upper back area (which I pinned to the seat). Now my head isn't hitting the backrest constantly and my shoulders can lean back on something too. I am also going to try the suggestion above and have my husband try to bend the rods on the headrests. I sure hope we can both get this figured out. I was planning to keep this car for a long time.

  4. #123
    Guest

    Further research over the

    Further research over the past year:
    Mustang aftermarket headrest addresses issue (for Mustangs).
    http://site.mrt-direct.com/blog/2011...rent-mustangs/
    Clearly, the Mustang aficionados are aware of the problem.

    Sent my wife to test drive a 2011 Explorer four months ago to check out the new "four-way" head restraint mentioned in earlier post on this page, and the dealer said he had no idea what she was talking about.
    Went to a local auto show and spotted a Toyota Siena with headrests installed backward. Pointed this out to a salesman, and he had a horrified look on his face, saying that someone "must have been having some fun."
    People are clearly rotating these things around the wrong way to solve this problem. Pushing people in this direction is poor engineering.

  5. #124
    Guest

    I bought a 2011 Honda

    I bought a 2011 Honda accord, the headrests were killing my neck. I tried my sisters 2007 Honda accord headrest and they FIT and now I am sitting straight and no neck pain..

  6. #125
    Guest

    May I add that I shopped

    May I add that I shopped around for the 2007 headrests and got a good price at Majestic Honda in RI, ordered them in the color I wanted and shipped to my home, they were brand new too! I now LOVE my Honda accord, the dealer where I bought my car said he had never heard about the problem and wouldn't do anything about it....They did look up the headrests for me, which I had already done the research, and gave me a HIGH price ( this is why I shopped around on the internet) ... I would suggest seeing if you know someone with an older model of your Brand car and be sure to see if they fit and are to your liking before you order them, mine are perfect!!!!!!!!!

  7. #126
    Guest

    Bought a new Dodge Journey

    Bought a new Dodge Journey last month, and after one long roadtrip I am having severe back and neck problems. The dealer won't even acknowledge that the headrest is a problem -- he says I must have bad posture. I am a 5'7" woman and my posture is FINE -- or at least, it was until I bought this car. I have never had a car cause me pain before, and I am really regretting this purchase. My old car was 9 years old, and I'm thinking I should have held on to it. I am going to try some of the suggested solutions here (an ergo back cushion), but because the headrest is active/wired, I can't take it out without setting off airbag indicators, so I guess I"m stuck with it. Grrrrrr. Now I'm going to go take a couple of aspirin for my aching neck.

  8. #127
    Guest

    Bought a new Dodge Journey

    Bought a new Dodge Journey last month, and after one long roadtrip I am having severe back and neck problems. The dealer won't even acknowledge that the headrest is a problem -- he says I must have bad posture. I am a 5'7" woman and my posture is FINE -- or at least, it was until I bought this car. I have never had a car cause me pain before, and I am really regretting this purchase. My old car was 9 years old, and I'm thinking I should have held on to it. I am going to try some of the suggested solutions here (an ergo back cushion), but because the headrest is active/wired, I can't take it out without setting off airbag indicators, so I guess I"m stuck with it. Grrrrrr. Now I'm going to go take a couple of aspirin for my aching neck.

  9. #128
    Guest

    Because of the problem

    Because of the problem created by the NHTSA regulation, my questions is this - how many accidents now happen because the driver is so uncomfortable driving his vehicle that he can't properly stay focused on driving? Has that ever been taken into consideration? Maybe it should be and a new design or regulation put into effect.

  10. #129
    Guest

    Folks, If you are another

    Folks,

    If you are another person with the same problem, please avoid complaining without proposing a solution. Does anyone really care if you bought a new car and have the same problem? That sure doesn't make anyone else feel better, unless you explain how you fixed it.

    To sum up the situation to date (10/09/2011) there are no official fixes, at least on Honda's part (should they have a recall? maybe). Here is a list of what's been working for some people:

    - Rotating the headrest around. This worked for me on my old corolla (I'm 6'0", don't ask... ), but on the accord it was angled too far back. You need the headrest to protect the neck first and foremost

    - bending the mounting bars of the headrest itself with a vice or equivalent. Keep in mind that you are modifying a safety feature, with all the underlining possibilities. Good idea though, worked for some

    - adding more padding to the seat itself. some folks went very creative by essentially modifying the whole lower/upper back section. The main issue is matching the upholstery and the time it takes. props for the creativity!

    - using a headrest from an earlier model. Again, upholstery issues here, unless you find a match. some folks were able to work with the dealer/supplier, although the price was usually there as well

    My personal solution (more of a workaround really) was to recline the whole seat as far back as possible with arms fully extended on the wheel. I would alternate this position during stops/highway, with leaning forward on the wheel while in the city. By hook or crook...

    I will post an update if I find anything

    Cheers,
    Arik

  11. #130
    Guest

    She's right. The auto

    She's right. The auto companies tried to tell the DOT, but the DOT wouldn't listen because, of course, government is smarter than all the rest of us put together.

    From http://www.nhtsa.gov/cars/rules/ruli...FinalRule.html Article VII:

    Comfort of the seat occupant. In selecting a backset limit, we have attempted to balance comfort, safety and measurement variability concerns. As noted above, no commenter disputed scientific data indicating that the closer the head restraint is to the occupant's head at the time of impact, the better the protection the head restraint offers. Numerous commenters, however, stated that occupants may be intolerant of head restraints very close to the back of their head. Further, because of differences in the occupant size, posture and seat angle preference, the same head restraint can yield different amounts of backset clearance for different individuals.

    Several manufacturers argued that some occupants would select a steeper or more upright front seat back angle, thus causing the backset distance to be below 50 mm. They contend that a backset of less than 50 mm will interfere with the normal position of the head. However, since ICBC reported that 49 of 164 vehicles from model year 2001 met the 50 mm backset limit, it appears that occupant discomfort in front seats is not an insurmountable obstacle. Accordingly, we conclude that the available information does not substantiate the industry concerns associated with discomfort from front seat back adjustment to a more upright position.

    UMTRI commented that a 50 mm backset causes interference with 13 percent of drivers "preferred" head position. Generally, these tend to be smaller occupants, who prefer a more upright seat back angle. The "preferred" backset position, as articulated by UMTRI, may merely refer to a position that the drivers are most accustomed to. The term does not necessarily mean that the position is the only acceptable one or even the safest one for a given occupant. We note that the driving population as a whole is accustomed to a backset position that is, while comfortable, not optimal to prevent whiplash injuries.

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