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  1. #1
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    Tires and gas mileage

    have had a 2004 hch since july 2004, 30,000+ miles, always get between 40-48 mpg. wife took car to east coast (we live in salt lake, job in dc) for a temp job assignment in sept. got 42-48 on trip out there and 42-48 while she was there. week ago bought new tires. all season radials, 65,000 mile tires. started her trip back two days ago and can't get over 40 mpg. air pressure okay. no check engine lights coming on. no bad sounds. did have a slight headwind and temperatures across the midwest have been cold.

    can tires make that much of a difference?

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  3. #2
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    You bet they can.

    The original tires are usually classified as low rolling resistance tires are are a common characteristic of most economy hybrids like the Civic and Prius. Honda recommends that you install those types of tires for non-winter driving duties.

    You can however reduce the effects of the added resistance of your new tires by setting their pressure to 1 or 2 pounds below the "max tire pressure" written on the tire's sidewall. It is pretty safe to do so and it should aleviate your mileage hit enough to be worth it.

    Cheers;


    MSantos

  4. #3
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    Mar 2007
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    new tyres

    Hi
    I am in Australia and am in the market to buy a new Honda hybrid '07. Unfortunately we do not have VSC ( vehicle stability control) for all Civic models here,but we do have curtain airbags.
    One issue with the honda hybrid tire's is the "looks". I much prefer the 16' tyres from the other civic model. HAS ANYONE CHANGED THE TIRE'S TO A NORMAL TIRE?. IF THEY HAVE HAS IT EFFECTED THE MPG ( liters / 100 Kms) ?
    Thanks
    Pauls

  5. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by pauls View Post
    HAS ANYONE CHANGED THE TIRE'S TO A NORMAL TIRE?. IF THEY HAVE HAS IT EFFECTED THE MPG ( liters / 100 Kms) ?
    Thanks
    Pauls
    Indeed, several folks over here have managed to do just that. They did not like the "Disk" wheels and instead switched to a standard "spoke" rim setup similar to what other gas only Civics offer.

    But, yes, it does have an impact on the fuel economy. The standard "disk" wheels play a role in ensuring that the drag coeficient remains as low as possible.
    Those who have made the switch claim that the impact is negligible. However, Honda's own specifications say otherwise. I personally will never change mine on the account of that significance.

    BTW: We don't have VSC either. Our friends in Europe and Japan have it though.

    Cheers;

    MSantos

  6. #5
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    The wheels are a light weight alloy. This reduces unsprung weight.
    They also decrees wind turbulence that open type wheels tend to be subject to.
    Tire pressures are critical. I recommend and run 40 PSI front and 38 rear.
    This combined with LRR tires will have a dramatic effect on overall MPG as will an incorrect oil spec.
    Factory wheels with LRR tires set @ 40 PSI and 0-20 synthetic oil will keep your MPG above 50 with ease....
    My last tank (#5 ) netted me 61.50 hand calculated. 326 miles with 5.3 gal. of fuel = 61.50...

  7. #6
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    1- Tire pressures, 2-system "Break-In"

    I just got in from the Honda dealership (hadn't planned on going there for a while as it's too far away, but had to pick up my plates) where I asked about the "break-in period" and also tire pressures for my 2007 Civic Hybrid.
    The break-in is several thousand miles for the system to learn my driving style. somehow it then makes adjustments and am told I will see further FE gains.
    The Dunlop tires are rated 32 to 44. The service department says
    1 - all cars' MPG ratings are with the tests at the tires' upper limit,
    2 - you will see longer tire life if the tires are inflated even up to that limit, and
    3 - running with tires inflated at the upper limit is SAFE (important to me, esp in wet conditions) though HARD. I'm going to give 40 a try this week.
    My trip to the dealership involved Dallas, TX hwy and city mix. Thrilled to see 48 mpg at now 2,500 miles of conservative driving.

  8. #7
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    Oct 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mrock View Post
    I just got in from the Honda dealership (hadn't planned on going there for a while as it's too far away, but had to pick up my plates) where I asked about the "break-in period" and also tire pressures for my 2007 Civic Hybrid.
    The break-in is several thousand miles for the system to learn my driving style. somehow it then makes adjustments and am told I will see further FE gains.
    The Dunlop tires are rated 32 to 44. The service department says
    1 - all cars' MPG ratings are with the tests at the tires' upper limit,
    2 - you will see longer tire life if the tires are inflated even up to that limit, and
    3 - running with tires inflated at the upper limit is SAFE (important to me, esp in wet conditions) though HARD. I'm going to give 40 a try this week.
    My trip to the dealership involved Dallas, TX hwy and city mix. Thrilled to see 48 mpg at now 2,500 miles of conservative driving.
    Congratulations on your great new car.

    Wow, that's is one heck of a knowledgeable dealership recommending the tire pressure at those levels.

    On the other hand, the break-in period varies significantly from driver to driver and driving conditions. Some people report the break-in completed within the first 5,000 miles others only experience it much later in the game especially as they approach the first oil change.

    I would read though the great info at www.GreenHybrid.com HCH-II forum for more details. You'll see a extensive "collective wisdom" that pretty much validate my claims.


    Cheers;

    MSantos

  9. #8
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    Yes it definitly will change

    Yes it definitly will change the gas mileage, talked to other hybrid owners that did that, cuts the mileage. We have a 2007 Honda Civic Hybrid and it will get replacement tires soon and we will have to buy basicly what is already on it, but we are going to the Michelin Brand. Hope this helps your decision. Have a great day.

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