+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 19
  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    0

    2004 Civic transmission slipping

    At about 30,000 miles I noticed my transmission slipping a bit. I know that there was a group of Civics that were recalled becaused of a bad belt in the transmission. Mine does not fit into that group since my Civic has a gear transmission, no belts. Honda said that the 30 K maintenance transmission fluid change would fix it. And it did for about 5 K miles. Then it started again. Honda recomended flushing the transmission a few times, which I did. When it started up again in a week I took it to Honda. They could not get it to repeat my problem, therefore no fix. Since then I have not had a repeat performance. My worry is that it will start up again and, since my warrenty is up, I will get stuck with replacing a 2-3 year old transmission! Is there anyone out there that is having the same issue?? I would sure like to know what your experience has been.

  2. Remove Advertisements
    HybridCars.com
    Advertisements
     

  3. #2
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by fchristian View Post
    At about 30,000 miles I noticed my transmission slipping a bit. I know that there was a group of Civics that were recalled becaused of a bad belt in the transmission. Mine does not fit into that group since my Civic has a gear transmission, no belts. Honda said that the 30 K maintenance transmission fluid change would fix it. And it did for about 5 K miles. Then it started again. Honda recomended flushing the transmission a few times, which I did. When it started up again in a week I took it to Honda. They could not get it to repeat my problem, therefore no fix. Since then I have not had a repeat performance. My worry is that it will start up again and, since my warrenty is up, I will get stuck with replacing a 2-3 year old transmission! Is there anyone out there that is having the same issue?? I would sure like to know what your experience has been.
    Leave the car for the Technician to drive for few days; get a loaner car from dealer. This might helps.

  4. #3
    Does the car have a manual or CVT transmission? I'm a bit confused about your 'gear' comment. If it is a manual, with gears, then there is no transmission fluid to flush. I'm not sure exactly how the Honda CVT works so I can't be sure but if there is a fluid torque converter, I can't believe that fluid change would affect a slipping CVT belt though.
    If it's a CVT, it could be beyond the capability of your local Honda technician and you probably should try to escalate the issue. Certainly keep all reciepts and paperwork in case they drag it out past the warrantee coverage period.

  5. #4

    try this

    Please address all concerns of power loss and surging due to faulty CVT transmission parts and the EGR valve in the civic hybrid to the national highway safety agency at http://www-odi.nhtsa.dot.gov/ivoq/ . The following has been copied and pasted from the link.

    By Phone

    Call the DOT Vehicle Safety Hotline at 1-888-327-4236 and a NHTSA representative will record your complaint information.

    General Information

    Your complaint information will be entered into NHTSA's vehicle owner's complaint database and used with other complaints to determine if a safety-related defect trend exists.

    If a safety-related defect exists in a motor vehicle or item of motor vehicle equipment, the manufacturer must fix it at no cost to the owner. Your complaint is the first step in the process.

    Government engineers analyze the problem. If warranted, the manufacturer is asked to conduct a recall. If the manufacturer does not initiate a recall, the government can order the manufacturer to initiate a recall.

    We do not have to receive a specific number of complaints before we look into a problem. We gather all available information on a problem. Your complaint is important to us.

  6. #5
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by ex-EV1 driver View Post
    Does the car have a manual or CVT transmission? I'm a bit confused about your 'gear' comment. If it is a manual, with gears, then there is no transmission fluid to flush. I'm not sure exactly how the Honda CVT works so I can't be sure but if there is a fluid torque converter, I can't believe that fluid change would affect a slipping CVT belt though.
    If it's a CVT, it could be beyond the capability of your local Honda technician and you probably should try to escalate the issue. Certainly keep all reciepts and paperwork in case they drag it out past the warrantee coverage period.
    Actually, this is a known issue for the first generation HCH with CVT. The changing of the transmission fluid at a more aggressive interval than initially suggested by Honda is the "solution".
    Honda knows this and acknowledged it as a design contraint of the Belts used in their earlier CVT's. The newer HCH-II vehicles use CVT belts with different specifications that were purposely manufactured by Honda (instead of being produced by an external supplier as before) thus making these issues a thing of the past. The ATF fluid for the new HCH-II generation was also reformulated to guarantee better and more reliable performance.

    Cheers;

    MSantos

  7. #6
    Guest

    I have a 2004 Honda Civic

    I have a 2004 Honda Civic Hybrid with a CVT Transmission. I've expierienced problems with sliippage. shuddering, and now a whinning. They supposidly extended the transmission warranty to 100,000 miles. This car has been serviced religiously and I have the backup paper work. At 77,774 miles the transmission is shot and Honda says it will cost me $6400.00 to replace it. Honda and I, are now at war. I have retained a Lawyer and I'll let you know how it turns out. I've been a motor head since I was a kid and I allways purchase the factory maintenance manual when I purchased a new car. They did not test or follow factory prcedures when they analized the transmission. It was never documented on my reciepts so I am holding them responsible for their inadequcies. They could have fixed the transmission if they had a competent mechanic work on the vehicle. Their inadequecies have cotributed to the failure, now its on them.

  8. #7
    Guest

    I have a 2003 honda civic

    I have a 2003 honda civic hybrid. Under warranty I had the transmission replaced about 4 months ago. Car is working fine. Brought car in today for oil change, etc. Dealer is advising that I change the transmission fluid now as it is dirty. I thought you only change the fluid every 30,000 miles under normal circumstances. Does it make sense that on a new transmission you need to change it earlier??
    Please give me your opinion. I'm also going to check my manual to see if it was advised after I bought the car new in 2002.

  9. #8
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    0

    Hi June; Please do not

    Hi June;

    Please do not hesitate in getting the CVT fluid changed. Believe me, it is the single most important thing you can do it you want your CVT to be long lived and trouble free.

    Not even the engine oil is this sensitive since you can keep it in even a bit beyond the recommended change interval without any major issues. But the CVT fluid should be changed aggressively and well before the recommended change interval. It should also be changed as soon as the techs recommend.
    And since the fluid is dirty, it is already well past due.

    Cheers;

    MSantos

  10. #9
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    0

    Ayyy Caramba! That means my

    Ayyy Caramba!

    That means my Civic hybrid will start slipping next year!

    What a car..........

  11. #10
    Guest

    I have a same problem I will

    I have a same problem I will take the issue to the court

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts