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  1. #41
    Guest

    By idling the car when you

    By idling the car when you start up in the morning, you are only fooling the car's computer into calculating a higher gas milage incorrectly. It doesn't include the gas you burn warming up the car and charging the battery when it calculates your MPG, but you are still burning gas to do it.

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  3. #42
    Guest

    In this forum they should

    In this forum they should meson the two thinks biggest we have found increase think to ahead to use control the growth.
    ==================================
    williamrichard

    California DUI



  4. #43
    Guest

    I am very frustrated with my

    I am very frustrated with my 05 prius. Currently I am getting 38 mpg -- tops! I have 38,000 miles on it. My dealer said it is probably the quality of the gas but it is no different from the gas I used when I got 49 mpg. Any suggestions? Is there anything a dealer can do to improve gas milage, in terms of a tune up?

  5. #44
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    0

    53? that is great! How come

    53?
    that is great!
    How come I hear all these Prius owners that say they are below 40?

    that is a great start!

  6. #45
    Guest

    Going into winter not happy

    Going into winter not happy with my mpg on my '08 Prius. Was getting approx 48 mpg, and now down to high 30's. What gives? It's Nov. in Northern Illinois, but I don't understand why this would affect the mpg so dramatically. I'm not a lead foot, and constantly watch the monitor to see how I'm doing. I'm amazed how even going as slow as 25 - 30 mph shows mpg of only around 30! Any suggestions for upping my mpg would be greatly appreciated!!

  7. #46
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    0

    1. Any gasoline engine uses

    1. Any gasoline engine uses up over twice as much fuel when the engine is cold. That's why chokes exist. Does not matter if it's a gas guzzling SUV or a lawnmower.

    Winter means it takes longer for the engine to warm up, so the engine gets poorer mileage.

    2. The Prius normally runs, then shuts off the ICE (internal combustion engine) repeatedly. This cannot happen unless the engine is at operating temperature. Even in the summer you may notice that the engine idles at traffic lights when you first start it up. In the winter, it may take a couple miles instead of a few hundred yards for the ICE to warm up.

    ALSO.. when you run the internal heaters/defrosters, the heat comes from the ICE radiator coolant, same as a "normal" car. So the more you run the heaters, the faster the ICE cools off, and has to be restarted by the computer to keep it warm.

  8. #47
    Guest

    To the man who asked about

    To the man who asked about Prius and cancer...I drove a Prius for a year and honest to goodness, was diagnosed with anal cancer after that year. As soon as I heard about the potential electromagnetic problem, I dumped the Prius and got a non-hybrid.

    A friend's daughter also drives a Prius, and recently had to have "pre-cancerous" lesions scraped from the bottom portion of her uterus.

    All true.

    I liked the Prius and loved the carpool-lane stickers. But I could not keep driving it if there were even the slightest chance it activated the cells that turned into my cancer.

    I'm still alive, but not sure about the future. Chemo sucks.

  9. #48
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    0

    The above post by CC is an

    The above post by CC is an example of how urban myths are created. Like power lines and cancer. Or cell phones and cancer.

    There are currently 590,000 Priii on the road in the United States alone.

    According to National Cancer Insitute statistics, this next year, Prius owners will be diagnosed with cancer as a matter of RANDOM PROBABLITY, because cancer strikes EVERYONE, including Prius owners.

    32 cases of brain cancer
    148 cases of breast cancer
    110 cases of colon cancer
    49 cases of leukemia
    380 cases of lung cancer
    55 cases of pancreatic cancer
    121 cases of prostate cancer

    Owning a Prius, and getting cancer does not make the Prius the CAUSE of your cancer. It just means you are human. Like all of us.

  10. #49
    Guest

    I have a really long

    I have a really long commute- I drive 200 miles EACH way on my Prius (just once per week). It's mostly freeway all the way, and the thought of going under 70 mph is too mind numbing to be taken seriously. But, with cold weather, I'm down in the very low 40s mpg. My all time best for thi kind of driving is 47 mpg, and I haven't been that high for a tankful in months. I'd be very happy to consistently get 45 mpg - is that possible at the 70 mph I'd like to maintain?

  11. #50
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    0

    Some factors that can affect

    Some factors that can affect long distance winter mileage:

    1. cold air is denser than hot air. So you get slightly more wind resistance at the same speed. Not much, but still a slight factor.

    2. Colder tires are stiffer, and may cause decrease in mileage

    3. Engine temperature. When I installed a ScanGauge II in my Prius, I found that the engine was being overcooled in low temperatures (below 40 deg F). Especially when I had the heater running. If the engine is not maintaining 180 degree coolant temperature, the engine will use more fuel. I increased my engine's operating temperature by blocking 3 of 7 grill slots in the front bumper, but WARNING- do not attempt to reduce engine cooling air without an ACCURATE temperature readout, such as ScanGauge. Overheating the engine is VERY BAD (read: $$$$$ damage) the idiot light on the dash for engine overheat only tells you AFTER the engine has been damaged.

    4. Road conditions. ANY water, slush, salt, sand or contamination on the pavement will increase tire friction and decrease mileage.

    But the greatest affect on mileage is your statement:

    "The thought of going under 70mph is too mind numbing to be taken seriously"

    If you want to improve your mileage, try slowing down to 65MPH.

    For a 200 mile commute, you will add only 13 minutes to your trip. But you may see over 5mpg improvement in mileage.

    If zooming across country in a race car is your life style, then you bought the wrong car.

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