+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 7 1 2 3 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 62
  1. #1
    Guest

    A manual hybrid with decent hp

    I want to switch over to a hybrid vehicle, but I refuse to go back to driving an automatic. I need one with a 5-speed manual transmission.
    But the only vehicle I have found so far is the 2005 Civic, which has an embarassingly low level of horsepower (under 100.)
    Can anyone help me find a hybrid car that has a manual trasmission and is actually somwehat powerful??? I'm getting frustrated here...

  2. Remove Advertisements
    HybridCars.com
    Advertisements
     

  3. #2
    Guest

    A manual hybrid with decent hp

    What are your reasons for not wanting an automatic? I came from a stick and never liked automatics either...

    ...but full hybrids are very different from conventional vehicles, and the CVTs are able to maximize efficiency better than a manual tranny. Since the vehicle blends power from different sources (gas engine & electric motor(s)), depending upon the amount of torque requested by the driver, traditional mechanical gears don't really work well. They would in fact defeat some of the advantages of a hybrid with CVT, since the CVT can run the gas engine at its most efficient RPMs for the given situation.

    Once I got used to the automatic/eCVT, and learned how to drive to maximize its efficiencies, I fell in love with it.

  4. #3
    Guest

    A manual hybrid with decent hp

    I agree with Brett. The eCVT used on the Toyota and Ford hybrids is nothing like the automatics in regular cars. You could not duplicate the efficiency of the eCVT with a manual transmission. It is computer controlled to run the gasoline engine at the most efficient point for the driving condition. The eCVT is an essential part of the full hybrid drive train. It is not a luxury feature for people who don't know how to operate a clutch.

    Try driving one of the Ford Escape hybrids if you want something of that size. We are very pleased with ours. The actual horse power is about 180 for the combined gasoline/electric but the low speed torque of the electric motor makes it feel like a lot more. It goes great up to about 60MPH but isn't much different than the regular 4 cylinder Escape above that speed.

  5. #4
    Guest

    A manual hybrid with decent hp

    The Ford and Toyota hybrids have nothing to "shift," either automatically or manually.

  6. #5
    Guest

    A manual hybrid with decent hp

    Lilly, my wife and just returned from a two-week 3,700+ mile trip in her 2003 Honda Civic Hybrid with a 5-speed manual transmission (to be reported on my blog here shortly). Sure, the car slows down on some of the long mountain grades, but so do most of the other vehicles. And the miles-per-gallon of 43.9 isn't bad, considering most of the trip was at the consensus speed of 75-80 MPH. That's not embarrassing at all.

  7. #6
    Guest

    A manual hybrid with decent hp

    Why did they stop making the manual hybrids? So, the only one on market is the 2005 Civic?

  8. #7
    Guest

    A manual hybrid with decent hp

    Harsha,

    Having a manual transmission in a hybrid really doesn't make sense from technical perspective. The reason a pure Internal Combustion Engine (ICE - gasoline or diesel) needs a transmission is because the ICE only performs well over a very small speed range (usually between about 3000 and 5000 RPM's). At slow speeds, however, they are very weak so it would be hard to start up - hence the need to shift the gears.

    An electric motor, however, has its maximum torque and horsepower at zero RPM's but the performance remains pretty constant up to the maximum speed. Therefore, since a hybrid uses the electric motor assist for starting up, there is little need for a transmission at all.

    If the industry starts producing strong hybrids, where by "strong hybrid", I mean that all the electric motor is strong enough to handle all startup, one will be able to eliminate the transmission altogether.

    This is kind of going to upset the large power train division in the car companies, however, so we aren't likely to see the transmission eliminated altogether for a while. The CVT, however, is a 'darling' of transmission engineers so they are happy to put it in the cars while no one is particularly interested in the manual transmission and the demand is rather limited anyway.

    We bought the '03 HCH with the manual because I realized it would probably be the last of the breed and my wife insists on driving a manual transmission so I can understand the interest. Now I don't get to drive it very often because she wants it to last forever :-(

  9. #8
    Guest

    A manual hybrid with decent hp

    Maybe it's just a duh factor to me, but some people enjoy manuals - they're sooooo much more fun to drive. I don't care about the technically good reasons for hybrids to be automatics or eCVTs over manuals - I'm still interested in the fun factor, and I want that option. I refuse to buy an automatic for my car, so I would want a hybrid with a manual transmission, even if it was a bit less efficient. Consequently, I'm a fan of diesel cars now. Dude, if you don't want the manual civic hybrid (which I wouldn't) go by a VW TDI with a manual. You'll get a whole lot more power than the hybrid, and get great mpg.

  10. #9
    Guest

    A manual hybrid with decent hp

    P.S. Lilly - I'm sooo glad to see I'm not the only one that's upset about the lack of manual cars as far as hybrids go.

  11. #10
    Guest

    A manual hybrid with decent hp

    More ranting - not everyone needs or can afford a full hybrid - a mild hybrid with a manual that is affordable would be a good thing. That's what the civic hybrid was until Honda messed it up...

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts