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  1. #1
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    45mpg+ Vehicles, 57 Models non-US

    According to DOE, http://www.fueleconomy.gov/feg/byMPG.htm, on 12/22/05 there are only 4 vehicles available in the US that achieve combined average city/highway of 40 mpg or better. And, it has been reported that 2006 may be the last year for the 2 Honda Insights. Note that none of these vehicles are built in the US.



    There are 57 vehicles available outside the US that achieve 45mpg(US), or better, combined average city/highway. Of these 57 vehicles, 15 (26%) are by DaimlerChrysler, Ford, GM, and Toyota. VW has 10 (17%). This data is available at http://www.40mpg.org/pdfs/120105_CSI...icle_chart.xls



    What is wrong with this picture????!!!



    The absence of this class of vehicle is dragging down the Auto Industry, MPG, Consumer, Environment, Economy, and National Security. At the same time, it is driving up all Fuel Prices.



    The following questions arises! Are either the Federal Legislative or Executive branches aware? If yes, do they care?



    It is my opinion that there is no rational reason these vehicles should not be built (or imported) to be sold in the US.



    These top 57 vehicles should already meet safety and emissions standards of either Europe or Japan. EU emissions are currently at Euro step IV.



    It should be noted that 90% of these vehicles getting 50 mpg or more are diesel (and none are hybrids from what I have revidewed).



    Proposal



    Congress should pass emergency legislation to waive, for only 24 months, import restrictions on gas and diesel light vehicles that meet EU and Japanese emission and safety standards AND get 45 mpg(US), or more, combined average city/highway. These vehicles should be grandfathered upon import.



    I estimate that for each of these high mpg vehicle put on the road, there will be about a 2 gallon/day fuel savings.



    My intention is to stimulate discussion and hopefully some degree of rational problem solving since the government, industry, and/or the financial communities haven't adequately addressed/resolved these issues.



    It is further hoped that you will find the concepts and strategies of sufficient value to share them with your peers, other media, government, and industry contacts.


    References:

    40MPG.ORG WEEKLY UPDATE December 1, 2005 http://www.40mpg.org/weeklyupdate.cfm

    "Over 35 mpg not in US - http://www.40mpg.org/pdfs/120105_CSI...icle_chart.xls

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  3. #2
    Guest

    45mpg+ Vehicles, 57 Models non-US

    Just a few observations:

    "The absence of this class of vehicle is dragging down the Auto Industry, MPG, Consumer, Environment, Economy, and National Security. At the same time, it is driving up all Fuel Prices."

    Fuel prices in the US are still extremely low as compared to the prices in countries where those cars sell well. (Mostly due to different government policies and tax levels.)

    "It is my opinion that there is no rational reason these vehicles should not be built (or imported) to be sold in the US."

    My guess is that their manufacturers would offer them here if they thought they would sell here.

    "It should be noted that 90% of these vehicles getting 50 mpg or more are diesel (and none are hybrids from what I have revidewed)."

    There is a growing body of research that shows that diesels are major contributers to cancer and heart disease rates. Their emissions in no way compare to those of gasoline-electric hybrids.

  4. #3
    Guest

    45mpg+ Vehicles, 57 Models non-US

    There a good chance some of these cars run partly or largely on ethanol. A few US car manufactures make these cars for the Brazilian market where ethanol is huge! By having the mix gas car can inflate those MPG numbers running on gas/diesel.

  5. #4
    Guest

    45mpg+ Vehicles, 57 Models non-US

    These vehicles would probably not sell very well because they would not provide the "phallic enhancement" that is at the core of most advertising. Car makers promote aggressive and competive driving practices and laugh at fuel efficient vehicles that don't win drag races. My 1998 Saturn actually hit 46 MPG on a long trip last Spring, but averages "only" about 36. I am secure in my manhood and have no need to compete on the road to prove I'm strong enough to floor an accelerator. We need a change of image for such cars to succeed here, and we will all be safer on the roads if it ever happens.

  6. #5
    Guest

    45mpg+ Vehicles, 57 Models non-US

    Thanks for your inyerest in this subject.

    Here an excellant source of information:

    www.40mpg.org

    http://www.fueleconomy.gov/feg/byMPG.htm

    40MPG.ORG WEEKLY UPDATE December 1, 2005 http://www.40mpg.org/weeklyupdate.cfm

    ** Here is the site of the UK's equivalent to the EPA/DOE for the curious [do not forget the UK uses Imperial Gallon, approximately 1.2 gallons(US)]: http://www.vcacarfueldata.org.uk/search/
    This data can be sorted by make/model or fuel economy.

  7. #6
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wayne View Post
    There a good chance some of these cars run partly or largely on ethanol. A few US car manufactures make these cars for the Brazilian market where ethanol is huge! By having the mix gas car can inflate those MPG numbers running on gas/diesel.
    I very much doubt it. Ethanol in the mix will actually REDUCE and not increase MPG. As was pointed out by H. Smith, diesels are responsible for the biggest share of those numbers.

    Ethanol contains less energy per kilo than gasoline, which contains less per kilo than diesel (diesel has an energy content of about 10% more than gasoline and the rest of the efficiency gain comes from the high-compression combustion process and more efficient energy use with diesels; diesel fuel also consumes less engergy to refine than gasoline). The ethanol molecule is basically two carbons, one of which is partially oxidized with the alcohol group on it, 1 oxygens, and 5 hydrogens. On the other hand gasoline and diesel contain many longer-chain hydrocarbons with more carbons (which is what is essentially burned), and no oxygens. Octane (8 carbons) and cetane (10 carbons) are the molecules which establish the rating of the fuel for gas and diesels respectively.

    The other problem with ethanol is that you must decide if you'd rather use land to grow fuel, or to grow food...not an easy choice on a planet that has a tough time feeding itself. Moreover the mechanized agriculture, distillation and transportation resources to bring ethanol to market are not a free ride energy-wise.

    The main "advantage" of ethanol is that it is a non-petroleum based resource.

    Jim also wrote: "There is a growing body of research that shows that diesels are major contributers to cancer and heart disease rates. Their emissions in no way compare to those of gasoline-electric hybrids."

    In 2008 Mercedes, BWM, Honda and VW are planning to release 50-state emissions compliant diesels in the US and Canada. These will meet California emissions. The main two components that need improvement are NOx (which causes smog) and particulates. The technology for particulates (particulate traps) already exists. The technology for NOx is near ready for release using multi-stage catalysts or urea injection. Do a search for "Mercedes" and "Bluetec".

    Any fuel reduction strategy that does not include diesels is doomed to fail. Both diesels and hybrids have their place and fit different mission profiles (diesels favour steady-state cruising on interstates and autoroutes; hybrids favour stop-and-go and variable speed situations where regenerative braking has the most impact). If, all things being equal, 50% of new cars on the road were diesels like in Europe, the new car fleet would reduce fuel consumption by 15-20%. If 100% were diesels, that would be 30-40%. And that's just on-road use of diesel. If you factor in the refining advantages for diesel, a very good diesel like a Jetta TDI is at least equal, by guesstimation, to a gas-electric hybrid like a Prius. If it isn't equal, the difference is very small. A debatable controversy is whether the best strategy would be a diesel-electric hybrid. Some say the gain won't be worth the cost, but Citroen and Peugeot are trying it in Europe.

    Am I a diesel fan? Yes. I do mostly steady-state highway cruising due to my work. We have a 2005 Passat TDI and a 2004 Jetta wagon TDI. The Passat is a heavy 3500 lb family car with automatic transmission and gets 5.5-5.7 L/100 km (42-44 mpg US, which is at least 4 mpg higher than the EPA rating) on the highway at 100 km/h (62 mph). It has a 2.0L TDI diesel that puts out 134 hp and 247 lb-ft of torque at 1900 rpm.

    Our Jetta wagon does even better, at around 4.6 L/100 km in straight highway driving, which is 51 mpg US, again better than EPA, again if driven at the speed limit in Canada. I can squeeze 1300 km (800 miles) out of a single 65 L tank no sweat with reserve. It has a manual transmission and a 1.9L TDI diesel with 100 hp and 177 lb-ft of torque peaking at 1800 rpm and remaining flat until about 2600 rpm.

    For more on diesels (VW's in particular), visit http://www.tdiclub.com/


    PC

  8. #7
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
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    I might add that I just got back from a 1500 km road trip.

    My Passat averaged 5.44 L/100 km, on a car rated for 5.7, by essentially sticking to the speed limit. I had a wee bit of in-town driving at my destination (it was a 1-week business trip). On the outward drive, I had averaged about 5.3 (I have a trip computer, but the final overall figure was computed by measuring fuel take-up at refill for distance driven). On the way home, more favourable conditions (clear weather, winds; going out I had rain, which increases rolling resistance signficantly), I averaged 5.1 L/100 km according to the trip computer which is 46.4 mpg. The in-town driving bumped the overall average to 5.44.

    That's a rather nice 11.5% improvement over the official Canadian gov't mileage rating (42 mpb), and a whopping 22% over the US EPA rating of 38 mpg for this car.

    The result was 1212.1 km (757 miles) from a single tank. Not bad for a 3500 lb car!

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