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  1. #1
    Guest

    High speed-long distance driving??

    Does anyone have info on the Hybrid's performance/reliability if it is used for a cross country trip?

    ie: North dakota to Orlando in three days? 75mph for 10hrs for 3 days.

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  3. #2
    Guest

    High speed-long distance driving??

    Mel, check my June 1 blog report on a 614 mile run in 12 hours, most of it at 75-80 MPH: http://www.hybridcars.com/blogs/blog...th=6&year=2005.

    See http://www.hybridcars.com/blogs/blog...h=10&year=2005 for the October 10 report on a trip from the San Francisco Bay area to San Diego and back, mostly on highway 5 where the consensus minimum speed limit is 80 MPH.

    Bottom line: My 2003 Honda Civic Hybrid (which has 92,000 miles on it, by the way) can cruise all day at 80 MPH. You will give up before your car does. Your trip sounds like a piece of cake. Send us a report. {grin}

  4. #3
    Guest

    High speed-long distance driving??

    Mel,

    Please let us know the mileage during the trip. Don't forget to keep the tires with the right pressure, maximize the use of cruise control, and don't use the defogger when you don't need it to keep optimal mileage.

  5. #4
    Guest

    High speed-long distance driving??

    I've recently done a trip from near Washington, DC to Austin, Texas and back in a 2005 Ford Escape Hybrid. The trip there was on secondary roads and such, as I usually travel, visiting everywhere. Got about 33 mpg.

    The return trip was in just over two days because of an emergency. It was pretty much all interstate at 75-80 mph. Mileage was about 27. Car was fine and never seemed to strain in the slightest.

  6. #5
    Junior Member
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    @ 75 MPH, a hybrid will return no benefit in MPG. Other than that, it will run like a normal car @ normal or worse MPG use.

  7. #6

    hybrids still get better mpg

    Quote Originally Posted by DrDiesel1 View Post
    @ 75 MPH, a hybrid will return no benefit in MPG. Other than that, it will run like a normal car @ normal or worse MPG use.
    That's not really correct. @ 75 MPH, a hybrid will get the same MPG as a non-hybrid that has the same, small, Atkinson-cycle gasoline engine. The hybrids, however, generally have smaller engines than their non-hybrid brethren and they can use atkinson-cycle engines since the electric part helps their low speed acceleration. The smaller engine and atkinson-cycle make them more efficient at high speeds even though the wind drag is the same.

  8. #7
    Junior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by ex-EV1 driver View Post
    That's not really correct. @ 75 MPH, a hybrid will get the same MPG as a non-hybrid that has the same, small, Atkinson-cycle gasoline engine. The hybrids, however, generally have smaller engines than their non-hybrid brethren and they can use atkinson-cycle engines since the electric part helps their low speed acceleration. The smaller engine and atkinson-cycle make them more efficient at high speeds even though the wind drag is the same.
    So where do you find a production car that`s not a hybrid with this said same anemic engine that's on the Adkins diet... Yeah, sure.

  9. #8
    You have to compare apples with apples. Rather than comparing a hybrid with reasonable performance with a pure ICE with anemic engine, instead, compare a hybrid with anemic ICE and good electric with a pure ICE.

    For example, take the comparable performance of the HCH and the pure ICE Civic Sedan. The HCH gets better highway mileage than the pure ICE.

    Are you suggesting that the pure ICE Civic would get the same highway MPG if it had a smaller engine?

    Similiar comparisons can be reached with the Accord, Camry, Highlander, or Escape.

  10. #9
    Junior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by ex-EV1 driver View Post
    You have to compare apples with apples. Rather than comparing a hybrid with reasonable performance with a pure ICE with anemic engine, instead, compare a hybrid with anemic ICE and good electric with a pure ICE.

    For example, take the comparable performance of the HCH and the pure ICE Civic Sedan. The HCH gets better highway mileage than the pure ICE.

    Are you suggesting that the pure ICE Civic would get the same highway MPG if it had a smaller engine?

    Similiar comparisons can be reached with the Accord, Camry, Highlander, or Escape.
    Did you read my question.....Your comparing a non existent veh to one that exists....I had the 06 Civic EX with a 5 speed auto. It`s a 4 cylinder 1.8-L @ 140 BHP. The HCH is a 4 cylinder 1.3-L @ 98 BHP.
    Now lets compare the two.
    The best MPG per tank hand calculated on the 06 Civic was 38 MPG.
    So now your telling me that same car with the 1.3-L would equal my HCH best of 64.1 hand calculated.....I think not.

  11. #10
    Perhaps I'm not understanding you.
    Your statement "@ 75 MPH, a hybrid will return no benefit in MPG. Other than that, it will run like a normal car @ normal or worse MPG use." indicates that you don't think a "normal" car (I assume you mean pure ICE, no electric) gets the same performance as a hybrid.
    This, of course, is incorrect.
    Then you say that you get 64.1 mpg with your HCH and 38 mpg with your Civic EX. Doesn't this mean your HCH gets better mileage than your EX?
    I guess I'm not sure what you were initially trying to say.

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