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  1. #61
    Guest

    Hybrid Minivan US Availability?

    Yeah...you guys love HEVs, check this out - whos pulling the wool now - maybe Toyota! IT IS REAL - check the Detroit News and free press!


    Ad attacks Toyota's record

    Environmental group questions efficiency


    October 24, 2005


    BY SARAH A. WEBSTER
    FREE PRESS BUSINESS WRITER


    "Is Toyota a wolf in sheep's clothing?"


    That's what a stinging national ad campaign against Toyota Motor Corp., launched today by a San
    Francisco-based environmental group, suggests. The ad is to run in Mother Jones online today and
    be printed soon in full-page ads in the New York Times and other publications.


    Created by the Bluewater Network, a nonprofit organization that fights for clean air and water,
    the ads against Toyota are thought to be the first ever to attack a Japanese automaker on its
    environmental record in the United States.


    Bluewater says Toyota's hybrids aren't as efficient as their non-hybrid versions and questions why
    the automaker is fighting tougher standards on fuel economy and emissions. They also note that
    while Toyota's overall fuel economy is the best in the industry, it is worse than it was 20 years
    ago, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.


    Toyota spokeswoman Nancy Hubbell said the automaker is disappointed by the campaign.


    "Toyota is definitely the environmental leader, and we're extremely surprised," she said.


    Bluewater is the same environmental group that launched a personal ad campaign against Ford Motor
    Co. last year, portraying Ford Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Bill Ford as Pinocchio and
    challenging the automaker's record on environmental issues.


    Those ads, according to Bluewater, were largely a consequence of Ford portraying himself as an
    environmentalist, making promises and not keeping them.


    Now, Bluewater is taking on Toyota.


    "We don't enjoy playing the truth squad," Danielle Fugere, director of climate change at
    Bluewater, said. "But when the auto industry misleads the public, whether intentionally or not,
    someone's got to set the record straight."


    The ads against Toyota are likely to be heralded by Detroit automakers, which have been crying
    foul for years now over Toyota's seemingly bulletproof image with consumers as the environmentally
    friendly automaker.


    Toyota makes one-third of the hybrid gasoline-electric vehicles sold in the United States and has
    consequently benefited from Earth-friendly buzz -- even getting A-list celebrities to arrive at
    the Academy Awards in hybrid Prius compact cars as an environmentally conscious fashion statement.


    But Bluewater's ads, which were obtained by the Free Press last week, show Toyota CEO Katsuaki
    Watanabe in the foreground and a man wearing a wolf head in the background. The ads list a series
    of concerns about Toyota.


    Foremost, the group questions why Toyota's newest hybrids don't get much better fuel economy than
    their non-hybrid versions.


    The hybrid version of the Highlander got only 20.6 miles per gallon in a week-long test drive this
    year on a range of driving conditions by Free Press auto critic Mark Phelan. The EPA rating shows
    the vehicle gets 33 m.p.g. city/28 m.p.g. highway in federal tests. The non-hybrid Highlander,
    meanwhile, was rated 19 m.p.g. city/25 m.p.g. highway by the EPA -- much closer to the actual
    results in the hybrid.


    Other journalists have found similar results, Bluewater notes in its ad, calling the Highlander
    and Lexus RX 400h "gas guzzlers with no better fuel economy than their non-hybrid versions."


    "If this is the precedent for Toyota's future hybrids, that will be bad news for global warming
    and our dependence on foreign oil," the ad says.


    Hubbell of Toyota defended the company's hybrid vehicles, saying they are more efficient than
    their gasoline counterparts. What's more, she said they are 80% cleaner in emissions.


    Bluewater also asks why Toyota is working with other automakers to resist federal efforts to raise
    national fuel mileage standards and suing to block California's proposed regulations to reduce
    smog and greenhouse gas pollution.


    Hubbell said Toyota is lobbying for regulations that are "rational and national," to avoid a
    patchwork system of standards "that would be a nightmare" to comply with for manufacturers.


    The ads also note that the average fuel mileage of Toyota vehicles is worse today than it was 20
    years ago, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's 2005 Fuel Economy Trends
    report. In 2005, Toyota's fleet averaged 27.5 miles per gallon, the highest among manufacturers.
    But the company performed better in 1985, with its fleet averaging 30.0 miles per gallon, the EPA
    report shows.


    While Toyota has a stable of fuel-efficient cars, including the hybrid Prius, it also makes the
    Land Cruiser SUV (17 m.p.g. on the highway); Sequoia SUV (18 m.p.g.); 4Runner SUV (21 m.p.g.), and
    Tundra Double Cab (18 m.p.g.). Those vehicles have helped lower Toyota's overall fuel economy.


    "Toyota has a lot of explaining to do," Bluewater's ads say. "We thought Toyota cared about the
    environment. ... Is this the same company that brought us the hybrid Prius, claiming to be an
    environmental leader?"


    The ads provide Toyota's telephone number and encourage consumers to call and ask Toyota to "build
    more fuel-efficient cars and end Toyota's opposition to critical U.S. environmental policies."


    Contact SARAH A. WEBSTER at 313-222-5394 or swebster@freepress.com.

    FEEL SHEEPISH NOW - WHOS LEADING THE BLIND!


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  3. #62
    Guest

    Hybrid Minivan US Availability?

    before you go jumping off the bridge to "HEVs", read this..
    Ad attacks Toyota's record


    Environmental group questions efficiency


    October 24, 2005


    BY SARAH A. WEBSTER
    FREE PRESS BUSINESS WRITER


    "Is Toyota a wolf in sheep's clothing?"


    That's what a stinging national ad campaign against Toyota Motor Corp., launched today by a San
    Francisco-based environmental group, suggests. The ad is to run in Mother Jones online today and
    be printed soon in full-page ads in the New York Times and other publications.


    Created by the Bluewater Network, a nonprofit organization that fights for clean air and water,
    the ads against Toyota are thought to be the first ever to attack a Japanese automaker on its
    environmental record in the United States.


    Bluewater says Toyota's hybrids aren't as efficient as their non-hybrid versions and questions why
    the automaker is fighting tougher standards on fuel economy and emissions. They also note that
    while Toyota's overall fuel economy is the best in the industry, it is worse than it was 20 years
    ago, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.


    Toyota spokeswoman Nancy Hubbell said the automaker is disappointed by the campaign.


    "Toyota is definitely the environmental leader, and we're extremely surprised," she said.


    Bluewater is the same environmental group that launched a personal ad campaign against Ford Motor
    Co. last year, portraying Ford Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Bill Ford as Pinocchio and
    challenging the automaker's record on environmental issues.


    Those ads, according to Bluewater, were largely a consequence of Ford portraying himself as an
    environmentalist, making promises and not keeping them.


    Now, Bluewater is taking on Toyota.


    "We don't enjoy playing the truth squad," Danielle Fugere, director of climate change at
    Bluewater, said. "But when the auto industry misleads the public, whether intentionally or not,
    someone's got to set the record straight."


    The ads against Toyota are likely to be heralded by Detroit automakers, which have been crying
    foul for years now over Toyota's seemingly bulletproof image with consumers as the environmentally
    friendly automaker.


    Toyota makes one-third of the hybrid gasoline-electric vehicles sold in the United States and has
    consequently benefited from Earth-friendly buzz -- even getting A-list celebrities to arrive at
    the Academy Awards in hybrid Prius compact cars as an environmentally conscious fashion statement.


    But Bluewater's ads, which were obtained by the Free Press last week, show Toyota CEO Katsuaki
    Watanabe in the foreground and a man wearing a wolf head in the background. The ads list a series
    of concerns about Toyota.


    Foremost, the group questions why Toyota's newest hybrids don't get much better fuel economy than
    their non-hybrid versions.


    The hybrid version of the Highlander got only 20.6 miles per gallon in a week-long test drive this
    year on a range of driving conditions by Free Press auto critic Mark Phelan. The EPA rating shows
    the vehicle gets 33 m.p.g. city/28 m.p.g. highway in federal tests. The non-hybrid Highlander,
    meanwhile, was rated 19 m.p.g. city/25 m.p.g. highway by the EPA -- much closer to the actual
    results in the hybrid.


    Other journalists have found similar results, Bluewater notes in its ad, calling the Highlander
    and Lexus RX 400h "gas guzzlers with no better fuel economy than their non-hybrid versions."


    "If this is the precedent for Toyota's future hybrids, that will be bad news for global warming
    and our dependence on foreign oil," the ad says.


    Hubbell of Toyota defended the company's hybrid vehicles, saying they are more efficient than
    their gasoline counterparts. What's more, she said they are 80% cleaner in emissions.


    Bluewater also asks why Toyota is working with other automakers to resist federal efforts to raise
    national fuel mileage standards and suing to block California's proposed regulations to reduce
    smog and greenhouse gas pollution.


    Hubbell said Toyota is lobbying for regulations that are "rational and national," to avoid a
    patchwork system of standards "that would be a nightmare" to comply with for manufacturers.


    The ads also note that the average fuel mileage of Toyota vehicles is worse today than it was 20
    years ago, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's 2005 Fuel Economy Trends
    report. In 2005, Toyota's fleet averaged 27.5 miles per gallon, the highest among manufacturers.
    But the company performed better in 1985, with its fleet averaging 30.0 miles per gallon, the EPA
    report shows.


    While Toyota has a stable of fuel-efficient cars, including the hybrid Prius, it also makes the
    Land Cruiser SUV (17 m.p.g. on the highway); Sequoia SUV (18 m.p.g.); 4Runner SUV (21 m.p.g.), and
    Tundra Double Cab (18 m.p.g.). Those vehicles have helped lower Toyota's overall fuel economy.


    "Toyota has a lot of explaining to do," Bluewater's ads say. "We thought Toyota cared about the
    environment. ... Is this the same company that brought us the hybrid Prius, claiming to be an
    environmental leader?"


    The ads provide Toyota's telephone number and encourage consumers to call and ask Toyota to "build
    more fuel-efficient cars and end Toyota's opposition to critical U.S. environmental policies."


    Contact SARAH A. WEBSTER at 313-222-5394 or swebster@freepress.com.


  4. #63
    Guest

    Hybrid Minivan US Availability?

    Dave, if you beleive this so called "expert" your in trouble. Lets face it, when it comes to SUV's, Toyota is no diffrent them anyone else - to move a big old ark of a vehicle is going to take a lot of gas and produce a lot of emmissions. This is what americans like, so Toyota would be foolish not to make SUV's. However, in all honesty this article is nothing more then a personal vendetta against Toyota for having the brains to ALSO make fuel efficiant vehicles. Ms Fix has an outlet for her views, and she is using that for her personal biased attack. If your going to attach anyone, attack the automakers that don't make Hybrids and are making little to no effort to save the environment.

  5. #64
    Guest

    Hybrid Minivan US Availability?

    Wow! talk about a biased article. I'm not opposed to slamming Toyota, in fact, I participated in a slap down when they started crushing the few RAV4EV's, however, this is total garbage.

    They compare their 'week-long test drive' results of the Highlander Hybrid with the EPA for the non-hybrid but they don't look at how the non-hybrid Highlander compares with either it's EPA or a similiar 'week-long test drive'. They also slam Toyota's 2005 avg fuel economy with their 1985 economy without looking at any other manufacturer's similiar comparison.

    I admit that the Highlander hybrid is built for power, more than economy but this is ridiculous. I wonder if their week-long test driver remembered to release the emergency brake. Must have been the same clod that did Consumer Reports' hybrid test drives.

    There are clearly may other silly non-comparisons that I certainly hope people can see through.

  6. #65
    Guest

    Hybrid Minivan US Availability?

    Just to keep everyones hopes up. My google alerts have been going balistic over the Toyota Hybrid Minivan showcased in the Tokyo Motor Show.

    Long link: http://car-reviews.automobile.com/ne...concepts/1482/

    Tiny Link: http://tinyurl.com/dbxy8

    or just google "(sienna OR odessey OR minivan OR estima OR previa) hybrid"

    Dan <11011011> http://ScreamingMonkeys.blogspot.com

  7. #66
    Guest

    Hybrid Minivan US Availability?

    Toyota has a survey online asking what kind of vehicle people want 'hybridized' next. Here's a chance to provide direct feedback to Toyota if you want a hybrid Sienna (or any other vehicle style for that matter).
    http://www.toyota.com/hybridsynergyv...viewemail.html

  8. #67
    Guest

    Hybrid Minivan US Availability?

    Thanks for pointing me to the survey on Toyota's website. I voted. Like everyone else, I would buy a hybrid van in an instant. I have four kids and was down right upset to see the Highlander Hybrid. Is there really more market for that monster over a Sienna Hybrid? While I'm upset that there isn't a hybrid option out there, I'm glad that the Odessey has decent gas mileage with the VTEC engine and could possibly see myself going this route if there's nothing on the horizon with Toyota. My current van is 8 years old and won't last reliably for more that about three more years... I'll hold out as long as I can, though.

  9. #68
    Guest

    Hybrid Minivan US Availability?

    Thumbs down Toyota for not bringing the Estima hybrid to US markets. I would buy one today if one were available. Why do we have to wait for the "larger" less fuel efficient Sienna hybrid when they already have a proven hybrid minivan available in Japan? I have heard nothing but rave reviews of this vehicle and would love to at least have the opportunity to test drive one. Come on Toyota we all donít need or want larger and more powerful cars. Thatís just the American car companies making those decisions for me and Iím getting tired of the same old message.

  10. #69
    Guest

    Hybrid Minivan US Availability?

    The Japanese mini-van probably does not meet the crash requirements. Does it make sense not to re-invent the wheel unless the wheel doesn't work?


  11. #70
    Guest

    Hybrid Minivan US Availability?

    I'd buy a hybrid minivan today. In fact, I'm holding off on buying one for now just because I want a hybrid. I can't wait forever.

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