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  1. #11
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    1982 Honda Civic FE

    Thanks for the helpful info. I can't wait for this "three litre" design to infect the US market.

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  3. #12
    Guest

    1982 Honda Civic FE

    as a owner new from the dealer of a calif 1982 honda FE i can say i drove it many times over 100 mph up and down the coast hwy enjoying 40 plus mpg and most often closer to 50 mpg i sold it with 145 mechanically maintained miles and it started and ran like a sewing machine

  4. #13
    Guest

    1982 Honda Civic FE

    The Toyota Echo and Corolla get incredible fuel economy and are LEV's. I hate when people say that the hybrids get better fuel economy in the city than on the because of regenerative braking. Its the lower speeds that give better mileage, thermodynamics says that with conservation of energy, re-gnerative braking won't give back as much energy as if you simply maintained the same speed, albeit a slower city speed. My Uncle gave me an Oldsmobile stationwagon which is 20/29 MPG city/highway. I which I could drop in another GM powerplant and increase fuel economy. I hardly ever drive it. I walk, ride my bike and take public transit.

  5. #14
    Guest

    1982 Honda Civic FE

    The Toyota Echo and Corolla get incredible fuel economy and are LEV's. I bet further work with those vehicle would go farther for cheaper. My fathers 2001 corolla goes farther on a tank of gas than I've ever experiencd. I hate when people say that the hybrids get better fuel economy in the city than on the highway and say that it is because of regenerative braking. Its the lower speeds that give better mileage. Due to the laws of thermodynamics, conservation of energy tells you that re-generative braking won't give back as much energy as if you simply maintained the same speed, albeit a slower city speed. My Uncle gave me an Oldsmobile stationwagon which is 20/29 MPG city/highway. I wish I could drop in another GM powerplant and increase fuel economy. I hardly ever drive it. I walk, ride my bike and take public transit.

    Opps. I made many spelling mistakes in my original post. Could someone erase that one? Thanx

  6. #15
    Guest

    1982 Honda Civic FE

    If you think the Audi is impressive, then how about a car that gets 235mpg?
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/VW_1-litre_car
    If I could afford it, I'd buy this in a heartbeat/

  7. #16
    Guest

    1982 Honda Civic FE

    "At any rate, the fact that Insight sales have dropped off to just 500 units sold in all of 2004 compared to 25,000 or 35,000 something Prius' sold should tell you a bit about how willing most consumers are to buy a car with 70 horsepower (the Insight has 73) even if it does get 70mpg. "

    Well up here the new Smart two-seater is taking the country by storm. It has a small 799 cc direct-injection diesel engine that pumps out 40 hp.

    It's rated for 4.6 l/100 km in the city, and 3.7 l/100 km on the highway (51 mpg city, 64 mpg highway).

    You could argue that it serves exactly the same market at the Insight, but up here in Canada Insight sales are sluggish as well.

    Price might be a factor: $26500 CDN for the Insight, $16700 for the Smart ForTwo. Either car is really only suitable as a commuter or around-town runabout. For $26500 you can get Jetta GLS TDI that is an economical family sedan.

    Again I come to my main argument against hybrids: economics. Most middle-income families really want to save money. A $26500 two-seater won't accomplish that!

    Mike

  8. #17
    Guest

    1982 Honda Civic FE

    Well the world has certainly changed since these comments were made. I live in Marlborough, New Zealand and have just bought a used 1982 Civic with only 90,000 kms. I paid about $1,000 US for it. My wife and I are enviromentally conscious and tight with money, since wages in NZ are very low. If Honda wants to help the enviroment lower their damn prices. Gas prices here are at about $4.00 U.S. here now. The U.S. is in for a rude awakening in the near future, unless Bush gets off his butt and starts looking seriously at alternative fuels.

    It has been proven that cars like the Echo, and any others get better gas mileage overall when you combine city and highway driving. I live in a small town, Blenheim and commute daily 25 kms, until they make them economical, it's just not worth it for poor people.

  9. #18
    Guest

    1982 Honda Civic FE

    I am tired of hearing all of the bragging about the fuel efficiency (mpg) of the hybrids. I am a physicist and am very familiar with the law of conservation of energy. This means that the total energy output of any machine is equal to the total energy input. That energy output includes so called "wasted energy". This wasted energy is usually manifested as heat.
    In the case of the hybrid, there is wasted energy in the following "machines":
    Engine converts chemical to mechanical
    Alternator converts mechanical to electrical
    Batteries (charging) convert electrical to chemical
    Batteries (discharging) convert chemical to elect.
    Electric motor converts electrical to mechanical

    These are five "machines", each having wasted energy.

    In the case of the conventional automobile only the first of those five occurs: The engine converts chemical energy to mechanical energy. This means that there is LESS "lost energy" in the conventional automobile.

    I contend that you could take a hybrid automobile and remove the roughly 70 kg. of alternator/batteries/electric motor (and control equipment) and have a vehicle that would have greater fuel efficiency (use the same, small engine that is in the hybrid). The reasons are (a) less wasted energy and (b) less mass of vehicle. The only thing that you would have to accept is that you would not have the high rate of acceleration of the hybrid because you would not be able to "borrow" energy from the batteries during the acceleration phase of the driving cycle. Once you get up to road speed, however, the fuel efficiency would be greater in the non-hybrid than in the hybrid. I do not mention regenerative braking because that has very little significance for the average type of highway driving.

    Americans may soon have to "bite the bullet" and give up their "performance" expectations in favor of mileage results.

  10. #19
    Guest

    1982 Honda Civic FE

    I had also intended to present one other negative aspect of the hybrid:

    We are all familiar with the environmental problem caused by all of the worn out tires. What kind of environment disaster is in the offing when the "worn out" battery packs from the hybrids need to be disposed? Most of us are familiar with the service life of rechargeable "batteries". (I put batteries in quotes because what we have become accustomed to call "batteries" should really be called electical cells. A battery is defined as two or more cells connected to act as one unit.)


  11. #20
    Guest

    1982 Honda Civic FE

    I had an 1983 Honda Civic 1300 FE with a 5 speed manual transmission and it was rated for 59MPG highway and forty something city. I bought it new. I don't think I ever got less than forty MPG and once we tested it at 55 mph (the speed limit then) on a road trip and got right at 60MPG. It was amazing how good the gas mileage was. As for power, it was lacking, but it went zero to 60 in about 16 seconds (nothing was that fast back then...even the sports cars). It was do 90 mph with no problem (except up a steep hill) and easily cruised at 70 mph. The acceleration did not drop off abruptly between 55 mpg and 70 mpg. It was a great car that I drove in college and out for a few years. I had over 100,000 miles on it and it never gave me any problem.

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