+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1
    Guest

    Hybrids in large vehicles

    Is it practical to assume that hybrid technology can migrate effeciently to large long distance vehicles such as 18 wheelers, motor homes and intercity busses, all of which spend much of their time plowing along at 60-70 mph for hour after hour? If so, I'm not sure I see why.

  2. Remove Advertisements
    HybridCars.com
    Advertisements
     

  3. #2
    Guest

    Hybrids in large vehicles

    i would think motorhomes & the like would benfit from hybrid technology, but commercial truckers would see little gain.

    i'm looking forward to seeing hybrid vacation motor homes soon.

    see ya


  4. #3
    Guest

    Hybrids in large vehicles

    i should also add that motor homes NEED to embrace hybrids seeing how dependant their industry is on the price of oil & gas.

    getting 6 miles per gallon isn't a fun way to drive around the countryside...

    see ya


  5. #4
    Guest

    Hybrids in large vehicles

    GM has been touting its hybrid bus tech for years. supposedly it increase mileage from 3 to 5 mpg. Just saw Meet the Fokkers last nights and Jack (DeNiro) had a massive motor home with insance gadgets. Can't imagine what kinda mileage that car got.

  6. #5
    Guest

    Hybrids in large vehicles

    MTA/NYC Bus running Orion Hybrids as we speak


  7. #6
    Guest

    Hybrids in large vehicles

    Currently hybrid technology doesn't work for 18 wheelers. I spoke with the owner of a truck company that had tried out a prototype. He said the idea worked well in town and on level highways, but the truck lacked the ability to haul heavy loads up long hills.

    Until the batteries get much cheaper and bigger, truckers won't like the liability of running a battery pack dead hauling a heavy load up a long hill.

  8. #7
    Guest

    Hybrids in large vehicles

    Hybrids won't work so well for big trucks, not from a cost-benefit analysis. These trucks spend hours cruising on interstates. There's little benefit to having regenerative braking in that situation.

    I saw a little program bit on the Science chanel on "hybrid" trains. I was puzzled at first, because technically a train already uses electricity as a transmission of sorts to drive the wheels (the engine burns diesel, turning it into electricity, the electric motors have more torque, though, and you don't need a transmission, unlike small diesel railcars). What they were really talking about was using hybrids on those little engines that work in rail yards assembling and breaking up trains (these engines are small and deal with variable loads and stop and start alot). The average diesel locomotive you'll see hauling freight, like a GP40 is already incredibly efficient and operates almost all the time near full capacity.

    OTOH, hybrid technology will work for busses, because they stop alot when working cities in traffic. Busses already use diesel because diesel engines burn less fuel at idle (about 1/2- 1/3 less) and get better fuel economy than a gas engine would. Still, they only get about 3 miles per gallon, but they could see big gains by using a simple hybrid system, such as a hydraulic or nitrogen resevoir to store braking energy, using it to propel the vehicle forward as a boost (similar to the Honda Civic Hybrid). A battery system similar to the IMA would also work, but it would be more costly in the long run. But castigating busses is sort of like barking up the wrong tree environmentally- a bus already uses less fuel per passenger mile than any hybrid car. It will save cities money, though in fuel costs.

  9. #8
    Guest

    small diesel engine 4cyl

    small diesel engine 4cyl maybe 50hp cat,yamaha,kabuta,etc powering a dc generator that powers a 500hp dc electric moter that runs to the existing transmission on an 18 wheeler. ok tell me why it want work.

  10. #9
    Guest

    everone is going about it

    everone is going about it the wrong way. I have the ultamate solution 2 the electric vehicle for all uses. it involves 4/12volt batteries/a very small diesel engine/generator and a large dc electric motor to power the vehicle. Somone please comment on this matter.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts