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  1. #11
    Guest

    Hybrid Batteries

    I've heard battery pack replacement rumours on the web range from $2,000 to over $9,000.

    I believe it is around $3,500.

    Honda's standard Hybrid warranty is 36,000 / 3 years on the drivetrain and 70,000 / 7 years battery. I've spent the extra $900 on an extended warranty which covers 7 years / 100,000 miles on the drivetrain and 10 years/150,000 battery.

    I keep my cars for 10 years, and at that time I'll have about 300,000 miles on my HCH. I do expect the battery pack to go flat. What will I do then?

    1. Drive the car with reduced performance.
    2. Check junk yards for guaranteed used packs at a discount.
    3. Since the pack consists of ~144 "D" size batteries it is feasable to replace only defective cells.
    4. Buy a new pack. But this expense wouldn't make much sence with a high milage car.

    Thanks,
    Steve

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  3. #12
    Guest

    Hybrid Batteries

    I don't remember where I read/heard it, but I seem to recall that Toyota expects the battery pack price to be around $1500 by the time people need to replace them. It may even be lower.

    I'm not too worried because I keep my cars (used to be Subarus) a long time also, and I have always put in OEM replacement parts and have never been disappointed. Even for a car with a lot of miles on it, if they're highway miles, all the better to fix the problem than to buy new.

    I'll continue to do the same with Toyota; and I'll let you know what happens......

  4. #13
    Guest

    Hybrid Batteries

    Curiously enough, this information seems to be missing from one of the most common parts sites, www.hondaautomotiveparts.com, at least for the 2003 Insight, which I used as an example. Most of the hybrid related parts can be found under the "IMA" heading. Here's some example parts and their list price:

    IMA Control Unit, Battery Electronic: $1557
    IMA Control Unit, Motor Electronic: $707
    Cable Assy, Motor PDU: $432
    Board Assy, Junction: $1328
    IMA Motor Stator Assy: $1030
    IMA Motor Rotor Assy: $1221
    PDU Module Set A, Intelligent Power: $1551
    PDU Unit, Predriver: $450
    PDU Converter, DC-DC: $1387

    Now from the pictures on the site, they appeared to have a part number for the battery pack itself, but it was not in the table of pricing. Still, just the IMA-related items above total $9663. Granted, some of those items are very unlikely to break, but still, they are all items that don't exist at all on an all-gasoline Civic HX, for example, which you can buy for about $14,500 with A/C.

  5. #14
    Guest

    Hybrid Batteries

    Who makes the NI alloy for the batteries?

  6. #15
    Guest

    Hybrid Batteries

    Photosmith, if you do the same thing with the regular gas version of the Civic you'll find the parts costs quickly will add up to much more than the purchase price of the car. It's the difference between "ala carte" and "full meal deal" pricing :-)

    Also I'd bet many of the components you list replace other equally costly components in the conventional model...especially the computers...

  7. #16
    Guest

    Hybrid Batteries

    Can anyone give me the NIMH supplier and the charger for these batteries on the Toyota model? I would like to get some stock in this company.

  8. #17
    Guest

    Hybrid Batteries


  9. #18
    Guest

    Hybrid Batteries

    If of interest, check www.gwmg.ca who are involved in Ni-MH powder production and bringing into mining production what will be North America's only supply of rare earths in 2008.
    Rare earths due to their unique optical and magnetic properties will continue to be vital ingredients in current and grass roots technologies.
    A Toyota Prius for example contains 50 lbs. of rare earth's in the Ni-MH battery pack and the rare earth permanent magnet motor.
    Certainly of interest is that currently 90% of world demand for rare earth's comes from one mine in China and as their own massive growth continues, new supplies will become crucial to the technologies which depend on them.

    John

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