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  1. #51
    Guest

    Hybrid HOV Waiver in Virginia

    It's sad that taxpayers don't stand up to the HOV "union" and their misguided delegates in the state legislatures. The fact is, there's quite a few of us taxpayers sitting at a standstill while the "so-called" do-gooders are flying to work saving both themselves and their companies money. Lost productivity, increased polution, wear-and-tear on our vehicles, etc. should be a greater concern to all the taxpayers sitting in non-HOV lanes. I say the taxpayers (that is, the VAST majority of folks who cannot drive on a state highway because they do not have "said" correct number of people on board) should stand up for what is fair and right. Let's all take a stand, vote out the misguided delegates paying homage to the HOVers, and get rid of the stupid law that has created more harm than good on our roadways. Hey delegates, I want my taxes decreased since I can't drive on my roads - the ones I pay for - ALL of them!

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  3. #52
    Guest

    Hybrid HOV Waiver in Virginia

    Maybe HOV lanes should be abolished! They have never lived up to their intended purpose - originally intended to reduce fuel consumption and when that didn't work, to reduce congestion. I believe that the only reason they still exist is because of the commercial bus and van pool lobby in Richmond. Everyone (except the commercial interests) would be better served if the HOV lanes were either converted to express lanes or integrated into the normal traffic lanes. Why should my tax dollars subsidize a few individuals who want to be confined in a germ laden bus.

    VDOT assumes that most commuters in the outlying suburbs only commute to DC (north and south). This may have been true 25 or 30 years ago. I would suggest that a growing majority of commuters aren't in a situation that allows them to take advantage of HOV. I believe that most people who carpool do so because they live a distance from work and want to save on the expense of buying gasoline - NOT out of some benevolent desire to releive congestion or save the environment. That is - most people who carpool would do so regardless of the existence of HOV lanes.

    As someone here suggested, adding traffic lanes (increasing the bandwidth) would do far more to releive congestion than continuing the failed farce of HOV lanes. The politicians understand this too. If you've ever driven through or around Richmond you will see that they do - plenty of "bandwidth" to be found there. If there was (is) money enough to build HOV lanes and all the requisite infratructure necessary to support them, wouldn't that money have been better spent and served us better by building the necessary lanes to carry the flow of traffic?

  4. #53
    Guest

    Hybrid HOV Waiver in Virginia

    Hi Folks

    As an FEH owner, I would never use a HOV lane. Wind drag is to hard on MPG unless your drafting. The slower lanes are better for me and I get behind a semi that try's to keep moving in stop n go traffic. Driving at the slower speeds in the HOV lane will just cause problems. This is not the case for FEH owners who don't care that much about mpg pinching and drive fast (over 70mph). They can still get decent MPG for a SUV, but why treat them different than any other vehicle.

    As gas prices rise and hybrids increase on the roadways, a slower lane maybe a better idea than the HOV lane. A 50mph lane with no stop signs or lights sounds good to me. JMHO

  5. #54
    Guest

    Hybrid HOV Waiver in Virginia

    I have a hybrid and I will be sad in July. However, I think VA should just open up the HOV lanes, add two lanes to each side of 95 and I think this would help. When all 4 lanes are open they usually flow well, except for Fridays. Adding two lanes to each side would alleviate some congestion. JMHO.

  6. #55
    Guest

    Hybrid HOV Waiver in Virginia

    We know that Hybrid was made for mileage and cleaner air while HOV lanes to minimize congestions. I think our elected officials should compromise by July 2007; Protect our air in Virginia by encouraging VOTERS to buy Hybrid before we bocome like other states with SMOG problem and give them the incentives to use the HOV lanes. If complaints from non-Hybrid owners becomes too much that our elected may not get re-elected, I am willing to go for Hybrid/HOV2 rule.

  7. #56
    Guest

    Hybrid HOV Waiver in Virginia

    My problem isn't so much with the waiver for hybrid cars, but the fact that non-HOV and non-exempt vehicles are allowed to enter the HOV lanes between Duke and Edsall Roads - as long as they get off at Franconia Road or back onto the main lanes just south of that. Why is this allowed? I believe it was to allieviate additional congestion around the mixing bowl, but all it seems to do is bring the HOV lanes to an absolute crawl from Landmark down to Lorton. Close up that entrance and keep the HOV lanes moving!

  8. #57
    Guest

    Hybrid HOV Waiver in Virginia

    How about adding more on/off merge lanes between the main line and HOV lanes. It would ease congestion on the main lines due to accidents or when HOV restrictions lift. Don't worry about the Hybrids, worry about the cheaters including VA Hybrids withOUT the proper plates or the out-of-state Hybrids.

  9. #58
    Guest

    Hybrid HOV Waiver in Virginia

    My TDi is more efficient (and cleaner) than your Hybrid!

    and I use biodiesel so it is considered an alternative fuel vehicle.

    TDI vs. gasoline - The TDi emissions levels are among the lowest ever for Diesel powered engines. All TDi powered Volkswagens sold in the US meet so-called "Tier 1" emission limits. The TDi is often "cleaner" overall than gasoline powered cars. CO2 emissions are 25% less than a conventional gasoline powered engine. CO, HC and NOx emissions are less than previous Volkswagen Diesels. Diesel fuel has lower evaporative emissions than gasoline. Diesel fuel also requires less energy intensive refining than gasoline.

    Diesel engines generally emit higher amounts of NOx and particles than equivalent gasoline powered cars, even though CO and HC emissions may be lower, and total emissions are lower due to much better fuel consumption. The current TDI Volkswagens typically emit slightly somewhat lower than the Tier 1 limits for NOx and particles (around 0.052 g/mi of particulate matter [PM] and 0.82 g/mi of NOx per EPA data), but the CO and HC emissions are far below the Tier 1 limits and well below the emissions of the equivalent gasoline engine.

    Furthermore, most of the unregulated toxic gaseous emissions tend to be lower for diesel engines. For example, benzene (which is a known carcinogen) is lower in diesels by nearly an order of magnitude (i.e., factor of ten) than an equivalent gasoline engine. Diesels also tend to be significantly lower in emissions of alkenes (e.g., ethene), carbonyls (e.g., formaldehyde), and semi-volatiles like polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs, many of which are known or suspected carcinogens).

    PM has always been regulated by mass (e.g., grams per mile). However, very recent studies show that particle number may be the more important aspect of PM emissions. According to a "real world vehicle testing report" by University of Minnesota renowned combustion particle scientists, new data show that PM number emissions from modern gasoline cars may equal or exceed diesel PM levels. It goes on to discuss gasoline PM emissions and that fact that gasoline engines may need a particulate filter much like that of a diesel. The University of Minnesota study showed that newer and older gasoline vehicles matched or exceeded diesel PM number emissions at high speed/load . It appears that diesel engines equipped with diesel particulate filters (DPFs), as many are now in Europe, will have a significant advantage in PM emissions over gasoline engines. Other recent studies are suggesting that gasoline PM is generally more toxic that diesel PM.

    The emission levels from diesel engines tend to remain more-or-less constant throughout the useful life of the engine, whereas gasoline engines have many more emission-related components which deteriorate and lead to higher and higher emissions as the engine gets older.

    Volkswagen has made continuous progress on emissions through the years, and 2000-model TDI engines emit far less than the 1996 models first available here. Further progress has been made in Europe with new fuel-injection and emission-control technology, but for various technical and market-related reasons, this technology is not available here yet, but will likely be arriving within the next few years.


  10. #59
    Guest

    Hybrid HOV Waiver in Virginia

    I agree with brian!

    My TDi gets 45 miles per gallon in the city and over 50 miles per gallon on the highway.

    if the HOV restrictions are based on fuel efficiency, then the TDI should be included.

  11. #60
    Guest

    Hybrid HOV Waiver in Virginia

    Me to.
    my TDI gets 47 miles pergallon in the city and over 55 mpg on the highway between fuling stations.


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