+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 11 to 20 of 20
  1. #11
    Guest

    Winter and Prius

    Isn't the Prius battery back in a reasonably well insulated part of the car, like behind the back seats or something? If you park your car in a garage, then even if the outside temp is -30F I can't imagine it's much below 0F in your garage. Also, when batteries are charged and discharged, they produce heat. Thus, just by driving the car, you'll start warming up the batteries, even before the cabin heater warms up the cabin.

    Part of the whole deal with the Prius was to have a very low base price and an overall solid economic package. Putting another electric heater on the car would just draw even more power, thus not actually gaining anything for you since you'd be drawing more power for the heater than you'd be saving by any increase in battery efficiency.

  2. Remove Advertisements
    HybridCars.com
    Advertisements
     

  3. #12
    Guest

    Winter and Prius

    Hi,
    Got my Prius in late Nov. 2005. The best
    mileage so far is 46.4. love the car but I'am
    not pleased with the mileage!
    My intown mileage is not as good as it should
    be. And I start out slow and don't push it.
    I do know that being in the hills of Pennsylvania
    cut your mileage as well as cold temp.

    Richard of Pa. 03-07-05

  4. #13
    Guest

    Winter and Prius

    I live in Vancouver, Canada where it isn't nearly as cold as Saskatchewan (or the rest of the country for that matter) but I too discovered that my mileage went up during the winter months. By accident one day while at a long wait at a stop light I was playing with the climate controls out of boredom. The car had just been started and I had driven maybe 1km from my place to a busy intersection so the ICE was still on and hadn't warmed up. I started turning down the heat which was set at about 27C (it was about -5C outside or about 20F). As I turned the climate control heat down to less than 20.5C the ICE shut off. Then I turned it back up to about 22C and it obviously came back on again. Since I discovered this, I've been driving it with the climate set to no more than 19C after warming up the cabin for the first few minutes (we have been fortunate enough to have had a warmer February than usual) and my mileage went from an average of 5.5L/100km+ back to about 4.1L/100 which was almsot as good as the 3.8L/100km I was getting during the summer months when I first got the car. I never thought the drain on the battery would affect the economy as much as it does, but it seems to be the case. I have found that having the stereo turned up quite loud does the same thing to the battery and ICE after experimenting with it as well. Since leaving the heat turned down more, I've also found that the ICE will shut off when I come to a stop after only a minute or 2 of warming up (such as when I pull out of my parking garage and wait for the gate to open). Anyway, I know that a lot of what I'm saying is pretty obvious, but I wanted to share my findings. So don't despair fellow hybrid drivers! Your economy will go back up (or down if you live with the metric system) in the coming months as spring/summer arrives.

  5. #14
    Guest

    Winter and Prius

    I thought it would be interesting to compare mileage to my Passat TDI in winter.

    I purchased the car in October 2004; so far my best tank has obtained 6.2 l/100 km average before winter set in (38 mpg, exactly the EPA rating for the car but slightly lower than the Transport Canada rating). The autumn average has been 6.6 l/100 km but this includes the break-in period.

    In winter fuel consumption has ranged from a low of 6.5 l/100 km (36.5 mpg) to a high of 7.1 l/100 km (33.6 mpg) during the coldest Montreal weather. The overall winter average has been (Dec 21 to today) 6.8 l/100 km or 34.7 mpg.

    I haven't been as scrupulous about keeping numbers for our Jetta as my wife generally drives it and doesn't always note the consumption but the summer average has been about 5.4 l/100 km, in driving that is more stop-and-go than our Passat. I estimate the winter mileage to be around 6-6.5 l/100 km.

    Mike G.

  6. #15
    Guest

    Winter and Prius

    I own a 2004 HCH. I agree with the poster who pointed out that many of us didn't know how far our mileage can plummet in cold temperatures until we got cars with instantaeous MPG gauges. I have noticed a consistent drop in MPG every time the outside air drops below 60 degrees. In fact, I believe a 10-20% drop in mileage in the Winter is probably not uncommon (even without ice or snow).

  7. #16
    Guest

    Winter and Prius

    Can you warm the Prius up without driving? Do you need to? I am having a hard time invisioning winter driving, I get out of work, unplug the block heater, start the car up, do I drive away or do I wait a couple of minutes like a normal car?

  8. #17
    Guest

    Winter and Prius

    The mantra for Prius seems to be "Just drive it".

    The engine warms up well while driving.

    My only quibble is that the interior does not warm up as much as I would like when the outside temperature is below -30 C (-20 F). In this case I have started letting car idle for ten minutes so that we start driving in a warm cab, not a cold one.

  9. #18
    Guest

    Winter and Prius

    Are remote starters available for the Prius?

  10. #19
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    0

    Winter Tires

    I Was Not Impressed With The Factory Tires And Winter Driving..most Concern Was My Stopping Distances....i Have Purchased Four Bridgestone Blizzac Winter Tires.....most Impressive...i Rarely See My Traction Light Activate And The Car Will Stop On The Proverbial Dime.......installed $420.......i Am Keeping These On My Original Rims And Purchased Others...oh I Forgot About The Tire Pressure Sensors......but Dealer Inquiry Found That It Will Be A Dash Light Only Issue Until I Find More Sensors....get Ready $480 For Sensor Only..

  11. #20
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Murray View Post
    I live in Vancouver, Canada where it isn't nearly as cold as Saskatchewan (or the rest of the country for that matter) but I too discovered that my mileage went up during the winter months. By accident one day while at a long wait at a stop light I was playing with the climate controls out of boredom. The car had just been started and I had driven maybe 1km from my place to a busy intersection so the ICE was still on and hadn't warmed up. I started turning down the heat which was set at about 27C (it was about -5C outside or about 20F). As I turned the climate control heat down to less than 20.5C the ICE shut off. Then I turned it back up to about 22C and it obviously came back on again. Since I discovered this, I've been driving it with the climate set to no more than 19C after warming up the cabin for the first few minutes (we have been fortunate enough to have had a warmer February than usual) and my mileage went from an average of 5.5L/100km+ back to about 4.1L/100 which was almsot as good as the 3.8L/100km I was getting during the summer months when I first got the car. I never thought the drain on the battery would affect the economy as much as it does, but it seems to be the case. I have found that having the stereo turned up quite loud does the same thing to the battery and ICE after experimenting with it as well. Since leaving the heat turned down more, I've also found that the ICE will shut off when I come to a stop after only a minute or 2 of warming up (such as when I pull out of my parking garage and wait for the gate to open). Anyway, I know that a lot of what I'm saying is pretty obvious, but I wanted to share my findings. So don't despair fellow hybrid drivers! Your economy will go back up (or down if you live with the metric system) in the coming months as spring/summer arrives.
    You are absolutely correct in your observations! I'm glad someone else has confirmed what I already knew. I too determined that in summer months, if I kept my cabin temp setting approx 19 deg F below outside temps, I consistently got better mpg (in the 49 mpg + range). For example, I live in Texas and it usually gets to 90 F in the summer. If I set the cabin at 71 or higher, mpg is 49 plus. Anytime the difference between cabin and outside temps are more than 19, mpg suffers. Also, once the cabin cools off (warms up) turn the fan to it's lowest setting. For winter, the same concept holds but the temp difference does not. The lowest setting for the heater is 65/max cold. When it's below 65 I set my temp between 66 and 70, and the fan on low. MPG is STILL 49+. Any higher than that and the engine will run to keep the cabin warm. Also, when I'm first starting out in the morning I shut all climate control off. After about 1/2 mile I turn the fan on low and the cabin warms up (temp set between 66 and 70). If it's really cold, I'll turn the fan on higher until it warms up sufficiently, then back down to low. You get the idea. If you live in a really cold climate, you just might have to put your fan a little higher to get more warm air.

    Here's the correlation: Higher fan speeds drain the battery, causing the engine to run to recharge. Higher cabin temp settings in winter cause the engine to run to heat the cabin.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts