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  1. #41
    Guest

    Honda Civic Performance

    The sad thing is no one thinks about how much oil is used in the process of mining ore ( fuel to power the machines ) , processing that ore into metals, constructing batteries. Hybrids don't really do that much, they just optimize a little.

    Why can't we look into ways of making synthetic fuel. Imagine the world if a hydroelectric dam powered a facilty that produced synthetic gas. The middle east would lose a lot.

    I wish people would start putting energy into learning science and math to develop real solutions. If you don't know what the frobenius method is, then go learn it, if you don't know how a pn junction works, then go learn it...in other words start learning in depth about how things work.

    Too much religion, not enough science...


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  3. #42
    Guest

    Honda Civic Performance

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  4. #43
    Guest

    I have a 2005 Civic Hx that

    I have a 2005 Civic Hx that I bought new in 2005. It's got a manual tranny w/AC. I consistently get 47 MPG highway since owning the car. Fuel economy dips a bit in the winter to 43-45 mpg, but AC use in the summer has little impact on MPG. In fact, the higher the temp the better the MPG in general.

    Oh, and I've got 195,000 miles on the car (2hr highway commute each way to work), have replaced the tires twice, headlights twice, but other than oil and filter changes I've never touched the engine.

    When I tell people I get 47 MPG, they normally question the point of hybrids and their higher cost.

    Rich

  5. #44
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    0

    Hi Rich; Thank you for

    Hi Rich;

    Thank you for adding your story to that of other owners who dare to make a difference. You've got a great car and if the examples I see from tens of thousands still on the roads today hold any value you'll continue to be at the top of the game for a long while.

    There will always been skeptics but the best way to make our point is by example, not words... and that is priceless.

    Cheers;

    MSantos

  6. #45
    Guest

    I am a very recent (less

    I am a very recent (less than a week) owner of a 2004 civic hybrid. I found this site very helpful in my decision to purchase this car. I am astounded but not entirely shocked at the experience of non hybrid honda/civic drivers who get great mileage, but I would point out that while great fuel efficiency can obviously be achieved, lower emissions cannot.

    Anyways, great mileage so far. I've already averaged above 50 on some highway drives and I average about 37-40 city, depending on traffic, stoplights, and hills since I live in the center of Downtown Atlanta. I am still adjusting to the driving techniques and look forward to continued great mileage!

    Cheers to the hybrid finally working its way into the used market in a real way. I started my own personal new era of responsibility, now if they'll just extend that damn tax credit!


  7. #46
    Guest

    I have a 100 mile roundtrip

    I have a 100 mile roundtrip commute Monday-Friday, with occasional drives while at work. I purchased my 2009 Civic hybrid in late January 2009 so that I would get a break on my fuel expenses. I'm happy (ECSTATIC) to report that I'm averaging 50 MPG! I expected to get 40, so it's like my Friday commute is free!

  8. #47
    Guest

    I have a 2005 Honda Civic

    I have a 2005 Honda Civic Hybrid. I have a question about getting
    maximum fuel efficiency. When accelerating to expressway
    or freeway speeds is it more efficient to accelerate quickly with
    much battery assist, or to slowly accelerate with little or no
    battery assist?


  9. #48
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    0

    Hi Tom; Slow accelerations

    Hi Tom;

    Slow accelerations with minimal electric assist are best. Same thing with decelerations. You'll want to coast or glide with the least amount of regenerative input.
    Of course, if you must come to a stop make sure you capture a good amount of regeneration for as long as possible as that is where hybrids shine over traditional cars.

    Cheers;

    MSantos

  10. #49
    Guest

    Thanks for post. Itís

    Thanks for post. Itís really imformative stuff.
    I really like to read.Hope to learn a lot and have a nice experience here! my best regards guys
    Honda Civic--Honda Civic

  11. #50
    Guest

    I own a 09 Honda Civic LX 4

    I own a 09 Honda Civic LX 4 door. I get 34 to 36 MPG Combined city and Hwy. I suggest you slow down before you have to stop, and acelerate slowly.

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