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  1. #1
    Junior Member
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    Jun 2010
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    how does hybridCARS obtain its reliability info

    I own a 2004 Chevy Aveo. This is a small car which if everybody used we would not really need hybrids.

    On this website, the "con" was listed as "dismal reliability."

    My car must be a freak, because since 2004, in six years of nearly daily driving, it has had exactly one (1) problem. The extremely vital AIR CONDITIONING system failed, and was fixed for free under warranty.

    In fact the only thing that worries me is that the original battery is still in there, and I am not sure when it will ever go out.

    It is a small car yes. The only true "con" is lack of side curtain airbags. But this website is offering false information by citing a "dismal" reliability.

    The Aveo is a small car with a 1.6 liter engine. It is not really rational to take it more than 60 mph, because of its lower mass. And considering the low price, it would have to break down 3 or 4 times more often to be considered a bad deal compared with other more expensive automobiles.

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  3. #2
    Guest

    Andy - We use what most

    Andy - We use what most major auto websites use: J.D. Power's Power Circle ratings:

    http://www.jdpower.com/autos/Chevrol.../Sedan/ratings

    2 out of scale of 5

    I'm glad you had a good luck with your Aveo, but it looks like the overall track record is average at best.

    Brad Berman, Editor
    HybridCars.com

  4. #3
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
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    Thanks for the answer. I

    Thanks for the answer. I accept that the evidence is such. I think the problem is demographics. This is a small cheap car bought by cheap (with no alternative) young people. What the Aveo actually is is a Korean car, which we see a lot more of nowadays.

    Demographics is the problem. That is why you see the smallest Mazdas in this country with a 2.3 liter engine. It has to be ready for the kind of jack rabbit acceleration and rapid deceleration that is the norm around here.

    A word to the wise, if you can drive wisely, you can save a hell of a lot of money. All I have paid for so far in six years for my Aveo is oil changes, timing belt replacement, a tune up, and new tires. Like I said, I am still waiting for the battery to quit.

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