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  1. #1
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    Oct 2007
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    Gas Engine not shutting down after 30 mins of driving

    Hi,

    I am having a problem with my 2005 Ford HEV. The gas engine isn't shutting down and my MPGs drop like a stone to about 22mpg.

    It seems to happen if I don't warm up the engine well or after 30 mins of driving.

    I found a post with a similar story and thought I'd share it with everyone because it sounds like a problem that may happen often after approx. 50,000 miles.

    It is probable that my "Electric Coolant Pump" or my "blend door acutator" has failed.

    The Hybrid batteries are meant to be maintained at a specific temperature or they will overheat. The 'Electric Coolant Pump' is meant to keep the batteries at this temperature. The 'blend door actuator' controls a door that helps vent heat from the batteries to the outside air.

    I'm not sure how I'll have these fixed since I've had a TON of problems getting my Ford dealer to even get a hybrid tech to LOOK at my car and because they won't provide a loaner or pay for a rental.

    Here's a link to the posting that I found:

    http://townhall-talk.edmunds.com/direct/view/.f16fe2e

  2. #2
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    Oct 2006
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    If the blend door was the

    If the blend door was the problem you would get a trouble light. The electronics coolant pump does not give a trouble light nor does it cool the battery. The problem may be the eCVT motors are not getting cooled because of the coolant pump not working and therefore you may not be even getting assist from those electric motors when they get hot. If this is the case you will also see a reduction in acceleration torque. When the electric motors get hot, you can't go EV because of a fail safe system to prevent them from getting any hotter by them running. My guess is that the pump is bad or its relay is bad.

  3. #3
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    Hi Gary, Thanks for the

    Hi Gary,

    Thanks for the info. It is definately an overheat. The car is sluggish on the freeways. Pushing 65 seems to be like hitting some kind of wall.

    I noticed that if I turned on my vent, I was able to get a little more power out of the car. Maybe because the AUX coolant pump that you mentioned in an earlier post is kicking in?

    I also noticed that when I was able to get into EV mode, the radiator fans were running which they never used to do before.

    This morning was cooler and I had a lot more power and dropped into EV mode a lot more often. I also noticed that a connection on the coolant pump seemed a bit loose so I reconnected it, but it's not a good test since today is much cooler than the previous few days (74 instead of like 80+).

    How would I know if I'm getting electric assist or not? My Nav computer always displays the electric assist arrow, but my analog meter's (probably not analog) needle is always in the middle except for EV only mode.

    The car definately feels sluggish when the ICE is on and the weather is not cool like today, however.

    Also, I did have an engine overheat warning, so I had the thermostat replaced. I read in one of your previous posts that an overheat code might still be in the computer if not properly cleared. How would a mechanic (non-Ford technician) reset this code and could this be the cause and not the coolant pump?

    Thanks!

  4. #4
    Junior Member
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    Oct 2006
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    The Charge/Assist gauge

    The Charge/Assist gauge should swing to the left while the small motor/generator (MG1) is charging with the engine or the traction motor/generator (MG2) is charging with regenerative braking. You should see the needle swing to the right of center when accelerating hard and the electric motors are assisting the engine for more torque. It does not take a great deal of acceleration for the electric motors to assist the gas engine. If your not seeing a big swing to the right for assist during hard acceleration, you've got problems. From what you describe with weather related issues, the electric motors are getting to hot and I'd say the pump is the problem. I've talked to a dealership hybrid Tech that said he tried to just fix the connection before but ended up changing the pump later.

    I had the same problem getting over 70mph in my '05 FEH and I changed the pump relay and it got better. Florida switch to E10 about the same time and it could have been the engine was still adjusting also.

    If your mechanic read an engine overheat code on his scan tool, he was able to reset it with that scan tool. If the code cleared on its own after a restart, that's okay also. That should have nothing to do with the electric motor assist or EV mode problem.

    The aux heater pump is connected to engine coolant system and is completely separate from the electronics cooling system. The only time the aux heater pump is running is when you are in EV because the mechanical water pump stops working when the engine is off. The purpose of the aux heater pump is to provide heated engine coolant to the heater core while in EV only.

    When and if my electronics coolant pump goes bad in my '05 FEH, I will replace it myself. I'm lucky because I know the local dealer Parts Manager and I get a break on parts and I have all the tools to do the work. Any good local mechanic could do the same job for the right price also.

  5. #5

    My 08 just lost it's second

    My 08 just lost it's second motor coolant pump. I have 96,000 miles on it. My dealer charge to replace it was $ 700.00. Mine just stops and says pull over now. Where is this pump located on the 08. I think I could change it myself.

    Ed

  6. #6
    Junior Member
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    Oct 2006
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    Hi Ed The $700 seems to be

    Hi Ed

    The $700 seems to be about $200 higher than others have been charged. Also, if you got the "Stop Safely Now" warning you may have damages besides the pump. With 96,000 miles on your hybrid battery, eCVT and converter, those should still be under warranty so it may be a good idea to take it to the dealer for a diagnosis. If the hybrid components have failed or are about to fail you need to get them replaced now under warranty.

    If it is the pump, the dealer can confirm it so you can change it yourself. It's located just near the bottom of the radiator on the passenger side. The smaller heater pump is located on the drive's side of the bottom of the radiator.

  7. #7
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    Hi Gary, Thanks for the

    Hi Gary,

    Thanks for the information.

    I did find out that Ken Grody Ford in Buena Park has two full-time hybrid technicians. Thank God!

    But, can you tell me what parts and tools are needed to replace the Electric Coolant Pump and what the procedure would be?

    I'd like for my own trusted mechanic to do it if possible. I was also quoted a price of approx. $700 for the electric coolant pump + Labor. I'm guessing that will be the dealer's price as well.


  8. #8

    Gary, When I change the

    Gary, When I change the MECP, Whats the correct procedure for filling with coolant? Apparently, you lose fluid when you disconnect hoses. By the way, my scangauge shows MeC temp around 100 degrees here in redding when it's 100 degrees ambient. I found the pump and want to change the coolant with 97,000 miles on it.

  9. #9
    Junior Member
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    Oct 2006
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    Okay Guys I've never changed

    Okay Guys

    I've never changed the MECP myself but according to the manual it seems straight forward. I first suggest you replace a $12 relay in the Battery Junction Box (BJB) located on the top driver side in the engine compartment. This is relay 5 in my '05 FEH and you can look at my photos on page 2 on Cleanmpg.com:
    http://www.cleanmpg.com/photos/showp.../500/ppuser/36

    You can turn the KEY ON to check if the pump is running without starting the vehicle.

    1. Drain the Motorcraft Premium Gold coolant:

    A. Place vehicle on a hoist in drive.

    B. Turn ignition OFF.

    C. Remove LH splash shield (6 bolts) to the transaxle.

    D. Place suitable container below the transaxle.

    E. Looosen hose clamps at the transaxle and pull hoses off to drain coolant.

    2. Motor Electronics Pump.

    A. Disconnect the inlet and outlet hoses.

    B. Disconnect the harness connector.

    C. Remove 2 bolts holding the pump.

    D. To install new pump, reverse and tighten bolts to 15 lb-ft

    3. Fill with 50/50 fluid and distilled water.

    A. Connect hoses to transaxle.

    B. Loosen the bleed screw and fill the degas bottle with coolant mixture untill it flows out the bleed hole. Then close bleed screw.

    C. Turn the ignition ON to actuate the MECP and continue to fill the degas bottle to the marked level.

    Note: Most air bleeding occurs at the degas bottle vent tube and very little at the bleed screw.

    As you can see there is not $700 worth of work!

  10. #10

    Gary, Thanks for the info.

    Gary,

    Thanks for the info. Looking at my invoice, Pump = $ 294.02, Coolant = $ 22.21, Labor = $ 316.23 and tax = $ 22.93 for Total of $ 711.65. After looking at my vehicle, the pump is very easy to access. One question. After I get a DTC for pump and change it myself, will DTC reset after awhile? My scanguage does not read this DTC and shows "no codes found".
    Thanks again for the info.

    Ed

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