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  1. #1

    60,000 MILES MAINTENANCE

    MY 2006 PRIUS WILL REACH 60,000 MILES IN ABOUT 30 DAYS MOSTLY USED IN FREEWAYS AT 60-70 Mph.

    DOES SOMEONE HAS ANY RECOMMENDATIONS FOR PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE? I HAVE COMPARED THE SUGGESTED MAINTENANCE LIST FROM 3 DIFFERENT DEALERS IN MY AREA (HOUSTON, TX) AND THEY SHOW A LOT OF "COSMETIC" ITEMS. ALSO THEY DIFFER SHARPLY IN THE SERVICE LIST AS WELL PRICE VARYING FROM US$ 330 TO US$450 (NOT INCLUDING PARTS).

    I APPRECIATE ANY SUGGESTIONS AS I AM PLANNING TO KEEP THE CAR UNTIL 2010.

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  3. #2
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    0

    Don't EVER ask a dealer what

    Don't EVER ask a dealer what service is needed.
    The dealer will charge you $$$ to rotate the air in the tires.

    Use the factory service guide in your owner's manual.
    (sorry, I have a 2008, so I can't tell you if there are any
    differences in the 2006 service guide).


  4. #3
    Guest

    BEWARE OF THE DEALERS. We

    BEWARE OF THE DEALERS. We have a 2005 and 2006 in the family. We stick to the factory reccomendations -that is what is in the owners manual. Save some money and do the engine air and interior cabin air filters yourself, and of course the wiper blades.
    Dont fall for the nitrogen tire fill.

    They fooled my 80 year old Mother in law into an "induction system cleaning"---on the 2006 at 20 k miles for 100 bucks.....they said the fuel injectors were clogged with carbon because the gasoline in south Florida has excessive sulfur....what a line of BS.
    I wrote complaint a letter to Toyota and got her money back.

    When the service writer wants to sell you all the extra services, ask him if your warranty is affected if you dont do what he reccomends.....Put him on the spot...

  5. #4
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    0

    I agree with the above

    I agree with the above comments, except for the nitrogen fill which can actually do you a whole lot of good, especially if you live in a colder/widely fluctuating climate or in a town with a lot of pot holes. Here's why:

    1. Nitrogen does not shrink or expand quite as much as oxygen, which means that your tires will always be properly inflated, therefore leaving much less drag and boosting your fuel efficiency. Tires filled with oxygen can have a huge pressure difference depending on the outside temperature, how far and how fast you've driven etc. Nitrogen is far more stable.

    2. Nitrogen does not "attack" the rubber of the tires like oxygen does, which means that you will have a much safer ride. I do know what it's like to burst a brand new tire by hitting a pot hole on a cold Chicago winter night, and I'm not too eager to repeat that experience.

    If you do decide to go with nitrogen though, just make sure you don't get suckered for anything more than $5 a wheel.

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