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  1. #1
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    Jun 2008
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    should I call the dealer?

    I own a 2007 pre-owned Honda Civic Hybrid, been driving it for 1 year. My MPG was reading at 42 MPG, about a month ago I replaced the 4 tires, rotated & balanced them & aligned them as well. Now my MPG is reading 26 MPG. and i've noticed that my gas is wasting fast. My current total milage reading is 25500 miles. I haven't replaced the air filter since i bought the car.I live in Houston, tx, where there is alot of pollution. Any suggestions? can somebody help?

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  3. #2
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    Joey: Given the operating

    Joey:

    Given the operating conditions you outlined this is what I would recommend:
    1 - Change the engine air filter - this will have minimal impact on the poor fuel economy you report.

    2 - Increase the air pressure on the tires to the following ratios:
    Set front tires to MAX_Pressure-2 PSI
    Set rear tires to MAX_Pressure-4 PSI

    The MAX_Pressure is the pressure rating embossed in the sidewall of each tire. So for instance, if the MAX_Pressure reads 44 PSI you would be setting the Front tires to 42 PSI and the rear tires to 40 PSI.

    Adjusting the tire pressure to these values will yield a measurable improvement in your mileage.

    3 - Ensure that your engine really has 0W20 oil. The type of mileage you report is typical of 5W20 oil having been used in the last oil change. 0W20 IS the recommended oil and the 5W20 type is only to be used in an "emergency". If this is indeed also the problem you'll gain 10-15 MPG's.

    4 - Finally, don't forget to read Tarabell's article on the HCH-II. This is without a doubt a MUST READ for all HCH-II owners.

    http://www.cleanmpg.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1306

    Cheers;

    MSantos

  4. #3
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    Apr 2008
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    All of what he said above,

    All of what he said above, and
    Did you make sure that you replaced your tires with a low rolling resistance (LRR) tire? Lots of people make the mistake of replacing their tires with whatever the fool at the tire shop wants to sell them with no concern for if they are a proper replacement for the OEM tires that came with the car.

  5. #4
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    I dont think I replaced low

    I dont think I replaced low rolling resistance (LRR) tires. maybe that was the mistake i made.How can I make the the tires better?

  6. #5
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    Joey: Sadly, it is pretty

    Joey:

    Sadly, it is pretty common for the OEM tires to be replaced with non-LRR ones. Still, while not the ideal outcome you can definitely do something about it.

    Begin by inflating the tires as we indicated above and consider the directions we offered as the MINIMUM tire pressure you should sport in these tires. Also be aware that many tire shops and service departments will deflate the tires back to their "standard" pressure of 32-33 psi unless you tell them explicitly to not touch the tires when servicing the car.

    When we increase the tire pressure up to the maximum pressure we are reducing the rolling resistance of the said tire and also allowing it to run cooler. A tire with too much rolling resistance (with lower pressure) is a hotter running tire and the vast majority of tire failures occur because of high loading (more tire flexing) due to the lower pressures.

    Also, purchase a small digital tire pressure gauge and check your tires weekly for possible signs of deflation below the pressures we quoted. If you keep them at a good pressure your glides will be longer and your car will handle better (albeit with a slightly harsher ride).

    Cheers;

    MSantos

  7. #6
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    my tires max psi is 51.

    my tires max psi is 51. Could that be a safe psi to filled them to? or close to that?

  8. #7
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    If the max listed is on the

    If the max listed is on the sidewall is 51 psi then you should be able to inflate to that. If you are coming up from say 32 psi you might want to make it a two step process to give yourself a chance to get use to the harsher ride and change in coasting distances. Go to say 40 this week and then up to the max of 51 next week. Just be sure you are measuring the tire pressure cold. Also don't trust the gauges at most self serve air stations as they are abused to death. I really prefer my digital tire gauge cause it very accurate and is visible in the dark.

  9. #8
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    Joey: It is very safe and

    Joey:

    It is very safe and whether it is obvious to you or not, setting those tires to 32-33 PSI as many folks do will simply eat through the tires at a faster rate and cause too much heat due to the added friction making them more unsafe to operate. Again, over-inflation is referred to pressures that exceed the Tire Manufacturer's maximum rating for the tire. Anything at or below that is perfectly safe.

    For starters, I would raise those tire pressure to at least 47psi in the front and 45 psi in the rear without delay.


    Cheers;

    MSantos




  10. #9
    Junior Member
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    Jul 2008
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    i read at at

    i read at at Autopartswarehouse
    that nitrogen gas really helps the tire to maintain its normal temperature.
    does it help to maintain a good mpg too?

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