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Thread: Battery life

  1. #31
    Guest

    First of all develop a

    First of all develop a monthly stronghold timetable for the car's battery.Check it for physical affronts like cracks in the happenings or frayed line which tins lead to wound and demolition of energy.

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  3. #32
    Guest

    HC -- I used to sell Hondas

    HC --

    I used to sell Hondas and sold myself the first manual HCH that came off the truck in 2003. We had it to this last January (2012) when my wife got caught in a snowstorm and parked it in a ditch and totaled it. It had 103k on it and we had had no issues with the battery to that point. But everything I read says that you are correct and MSantos is not: the more you recharge and discharge the battery, the longer they last. If you let them sit, they forget that they are batteries and often fail to hold a charge. You should have more concern about a hybrid battery (first or second generation doesn't matter) with very low annual mileage than one with average or high miles.

    That said, we did have our IMA and ABS lights come on about two years ago. The local Honda dealer said that it needed a hybrid ECU and maybe even an ABS ECU -- to the tune of $6,000 if it needed both. Skeptical, I got a second opinion and found it only needed a $186 relay switch. Be careful with any advice you get, even from the manufacturer. Get a second opinion if you can!

    And if you're looking to buy a used hybrid (which is NOT always a dumb idea contrary to some anti-hybrid sentiment on this thread), take a VERY close look at the CarFax. A HCH that needs a new battery will usually mention "Computer module/engine checked" about a week or so before it was traded. Not having the IMA light on does NOT mean the battery does not have an issue. We looked at a 2003 which had been serviced in a Honda store in Chicago where the owner was told it needed a new battery, they then took it to another Honda dealer in Chicago where they had it re-diagnosed and had the IMA light turned off but still did not change the battery, then a week later they took it to a third Honda dealer in the Chicago area where they traded it and where it was being offered for sale as if it were a perfectly fine vehicle. When I brought this to the attention of the salesperson (with the hopes that he'd discount it or maybe replace the battery), he told me that "they weren't going to discount it and that they'd just wait for someone who knew a little less about hybrids and sell it to them." If this is the hybrid you bought, sorry for your luck -- the dealer you got it from is unreputable.

  4. #33
    Guest

    There are lots of hybrids on

    There are lots of hybrids on the road today with more than 200,000 miles on the odometer with zero ill effects. Don't be so closed minded that one bad experience prevents you from reducing your oil addiction for the rest of your life.

  5. #34
    Guest

    In April 2012 my 2006 Prius

    In April 2012 my 2006 Prius had 92,000 miles on it when the hybrid battery started acting really strange and the hybrid warning light came on. I had the car towed to the dealer and was told that the hybrid battery was dead or dying. I am still waiting (since mid April its mid June now) for the replacement battery to come in from Japan. I am lucky that this problem occurred before the end of the battery warranty at 100,000 miles. Since I am an engineer and think like one, I have always been concerned about the Toyota battery longevity in southern Arizona where June/July/August temperature can reach a peak of 110F. I am now convinced that the hybrid battery probably was not designed to last beyond 100,000 miles in this climate. So my advice to anyone living in Phoenix or Tucson is, be aware of this limitation when you consider buying a hybrid vehicle. The dealer told me that the replacement of the battery would have cost me $4000 had I not been within the warranty coverage. If you have a Prius now, it might be a good strategy to trade-in for a newer model before it gets beyond 100k - if you live in a climate similar to Phoenix Arizona. I was impressed by the 200-300k longevity of the battery in milder summer climates in southern California - southern Arizona is an entirely different story!

  6. #35
    Guest

    In April 2012 my 2006 Prius

    In April 2012 my 2006 Prius had 92,000 miles on it when the hybrid battery started acting really strange and the hybrid warning light came on. I had the car towed to the dealer and was told that the hybrid battery was dead or dying. I am still waiting (since mid April its mid June now) for the replacement battery to come in from Japan. I am lucky that this problem occurred before the end of the battery warranty at 100,000 miles. Since I am an engineer and think like one, I have always been concerned about the Toyota battery longevity in southern Arizona where June/July/August temperature can reach a peak of 110F. I am now convinced that the hybrid battery probably was not designed to last beyond 100,000 miles in this climate. So my advice to anyone living in Phoenix or Tucson is, be aware of this limitation when you consider buying a hybrid vehicle. The dealer told me that the replacement of the battery would have cost me $4000 had I not been within the warranty coverage. If you have a Prius now, it might be a good strategy to trade-in for a newer model before it gets beyond 100k - if you live in a climate similar to Phoenix Arizona. I was impressed by the 200-300k longevity of the battery in milder summer climates in southern California - southern Arizona is an entirely different story!

  7. #36
    Guest

    I was impressed by the

    I was impressed by the 200-300k longevity of the battery in milder summer climates in southern California - southern Arizona is an entirely different story! ramadan messages

  8. #37
    Guest

    I am now convinced that the

    I am now convinced that the hybrid battery probably was not designed to last beyond 100,000 miles in this climate. So my advice to anyone living in Phoenix or Tucson is, be aware of this limitation when you consider buying a hybrid vehicle. The dealer told me that the replacement of the battery would have cost me $4000 had I not been within the warranty coverage. If you have a Prius now, it might be a good strategy to trade-in for a newer model before it gets beyond 100k - if you live in a climate similar to Phoenix Arizona. I was impressed by the 200-300k longevity of the battery in milder summer climates in southern California - southern Arizona is an entirely different story!

  9. #38
    Guest

    We paid dearly, got all the

    We paid dearly, got all the extras, figured we would likely never need a diferent vehicle...for many many years... because we baby'd this 2005 Civic hybrid with all the TLC it could stand and every dealer service it required... had hope of a long 300,000 miles of happiness... NOT! To begin with every service was an added extra 'hybrid' charge... even oil changes. Parts & Labor were generally 5 times the cost in the repair process. We are 115,000+ miles into our happy trail when the IMA Light & Engine Light & Battery Light come on during the home commute New Years Eve 2011. Service Center does a software upgrade on first available business day... makes the problem NOT go away! Hybrid Battery replacement cost $3899.+ !! Blue Book Value at Christmas - just three weeks ago was $12,000 - $18,000, with this given milage level. Now they are offering $1000. Trade-IN Value...( I'm bargaining for $4,000. ) There is no provission to add in an altenator to run as a normal gas vehicle. The Hybrid Battery is integrated in with --- The Engine, The Transmition, The Electrical Harness -- ETC, ETC, ETC !! Cannot be dropped out. AND COULD EXPLODE!!!
    After six and one-half years, 115,000 commuter miles, $35,000 purchase, plus the cost of the "Extended Warrenty Package"...here we are with a garage full of "modern sculpture"!
    With a notation: Had we bought the normal '05 Civic 4Door model? ... They still get the 40ish MPG, keep right on running thru mile after mile, looking good, repairs and oil changes would have been half the price all these years, we would have avoided this present headache and spent $12,000 less in the original purchase.
    Your Call .... Make sure your dealer is going to stand behind ANY Warrenty you might THINK you have on the hybrid technology!!!
    BECAUSE HONDA WON'T......

  10. #39
    Guest

    I just wanted to reply to

    I just wanted to reply to this comment to let you know that as a 2005 civic hybrid, you should still have a year of hybrid battery warranty remaining on the vehicle. The battery warranty does apply and they will replace it for you free of charge if it is truly not working. Another thing I want to comment on is the price you say you pay for oil changes. My friend has an 2008 civic hybrid and pays the same price for an oil change as anyone else does. 35.00$ for an oil change is not 5x what any other car costs to replace the oil and filter. I don't know who you get your oil changes through but you may want to reconsider that location. If you pay 5x what a normal oil change costs, you would be paying over 150$ for an oil change. If you do pay that, whoever has been replacing your oil has been ripping you off. You also only need to replace the oil every 15000 km as oppose to every 4000 km on a regular car so you only have to replace the oil once for every 4 times you do on a regular car as the car uses much less the gas engine. That right there saves you quite a bit of money on oil changes. As for parts and labor, your only dealing with a premium if your replacing parts or doing service on the engine. As for the rest of the car, its identical to any other civic you would purchase. The parts are the same and the work is the same. Whoever has been charging you a "hybrid premium" has also been taking you to the cleaners. The parts and the work to be done on the car is identical to a non hybrid civic, there is no reason and no way that you pay more to do any kind of work on a hybrid civic as a regular one.

  11. #40
    Guest

    Some types of primary

    Some types of primary batteries used, for example, for telegraph circuits, were restored to operation by replacing the components of the battery consumed by the chemical reaction. Secondary batteries are not indefinitely rechargeable due to dissipation of the active materials, loss of electrolyte and internal corrosion. Car tracker

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