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Thread: '09 FEH/MMH

  1. #1
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    '09 FEH/MMH

    The '09 FEH/MMH improvements has got myself and others interested with regard to detailed information that doesn't seem to be available yet. Ford is saying the new 2.5 I-4 will improve the standard Escape with more horsepower and 1mpg, but their saying nothing about any EPA changes to the FEH/MMH. It may be that Ford wants to finish off selling the '08 model year before letting us in on the fine details.

    Most people prefer to hold off buying the last year in a decade because the resale value drops because the vehicle seems to get old quicker. For instance, a 1999 model year seems much older than a 2000 model year. It seems Ford has all of a sudden packed some nice improvements in the '09 to off set the publics way of thinking about holding off till the 2010 model year. I remember when the new Mustang Pace Car came out in 1979 with many new changes and that stopped me from waiting for the 1980 model year. The fact was I just bought a new 1979 Cobra Mustang and traded it for the new Pace Car 6 months later.

    If we can keep this tread for updating details on the '09, it would be much easier for new buyers to have an on going update of what we're all finding in news releases. For instance, what is this new Michelin Low Rolling Resistant (LRR) tire Ford is putting on all Escapes. It is my opinion this new tire is going to be like the present Conti Eco-Plus tires and only allowed to be sold through Ford. From what I've read, Michelin will have new LRR tires that can improve MPG by 2-3% and higher. My concern is if this is true, the tires and not the new 2.5L engine was what raised the mileage on the '09 Escape.

    GaryG

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  3. #2
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    This might be the patent on

    This might be the patent on the new Intake Variable Cam Timing (IVCT) that the '09 2.5L is using. I was wondering how this works since Ford hasn't provided much information on the new engine design. The patent says it's an improvement to the Honda design.
    http://www.freepatentsonline.com/688...es&stemming=on

    "Tt is an advantage of the present invention that a system and method according to this invention will allow excellent charge motion without the pumping work associated with a cam switching system.

    It is another advantage of the present invention that the need for a charge motion control valve will be eliminated for engines otherwise requiring high charge motion at idle and low-speed operation, or more generally, part load conditions.

    It is a further advantage of the present invention that an engine equipped with a valve control system according to the present invention will be capable of not only high specific output but also excellent charge motion at part load conditions."

    GaryG

  4. #3
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    Thanks for searching and

    Thanks for searching and finding this type of information. My mechanical knowledge is not the best so I struggle with this information. Could the improved torque output also improve fuel efficiency in terrain that features plenty of vertical change?

  5. #4
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    The present 2.3L Atkinson

    The present 2.3L Atkinson goes to 100% load and motor assist far to easy. The load the generator puts on the 2.3L engine alone really limits the available torque for acceleration. From reading the patent, I can see the new IVCT 2.5L should be a big improvement depending on how Ford works this into the Atkinson Cycle intake valve arrangement. I would think the IVCT system would allow Ford to fine-tune the Atkinson Cycle with much better torque and FE. What I'm very interested to see is how FE will improve while running the A/C compressor. The 2.3L is dragged down to much in FE running the A/C with its low torque now IMO.

    So yes, climbing hills should be better for FE, the way I climb hills anyway. I need more torque with low RPM's for better FE overall than the present 2.3L we have now. I like to reserve motor assist and the battery for pure EV driving later at a steady state speed for the best FE.

    GaryG

  6. #5
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    After doing some research,

    After doing some research, my bet is Ford has got Michelin to design this tire and size for the '09 Ford Escape. Michelin is going to release a big size option in the Fall of '08 for this new "Energy Saver" tire line, but I think Ford has a jump on this tire for the '09 Escape. I found much recent reports from Michelin on this tire, but I think this was one of the earlier announcements.

    Subscribe to Tire Review
    September 12, 2007
    "Category: North America(Akron/Tire Review) Groupe Michelin used the 2007 the International Motor Show in Frankfurt to unveil its new Energy Saver tire line, which it claims will dramatically reduce carbon emissions and cut fuel consumption.
    ''You will save two euros every time you fill the tank,'' Thierry Coudurier, head of Michelin’s passenger and light truck products, told reports at the event. Michelin plans to sell some 100 million of the new tire in the next five years, he said.

    PSA Peugeot Citroen’s new 308 has already added the tire as OE, and Michelin plans to offer the tire to other automakers.

    ''They (the Energy Saver tires) will be for sure a bit more expensive'' than regular tires, Courdurier said.

    The company said it has spent $41.5 million developing the Energy Saver line."

    Michelin has also came out with a new winter tire called the X-Ice Xi2 that appears to be a great tire for you snow birds.

    GaryG

  7. #6
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    Thanks for digging up this

    Thanks for digging up this information. Good for those in the market for replacement tires in the future.

  8. #7
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    Get this Billy, the PLUG-IN

    Get this Billy, the PLUG-IN HYBRID Escape that Ford gave Southern California Edison had Goodyear tires. At the Ceremony, many pictures were taken of that FEH and I could clearly read Goodyear in one photos showing the tire. The rims were not the '08 hybrid rims either The pictures were taken on Dec. 4th '07 by a number of press reporters, so I thought I'd look at some of the details with my Blue-ray HD computer screen.
    http://www.autobloggreen.com/gallery...remony/517172/

    It would be nice if anyone spots the Factory Plug-In Escape and takes pictures to be posted. It appears the Unit was equipped with the new '09 fuel fill system also.

    GaryG

  9. #8
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    In several months you should

    In several months you should have your 2009 FEH. Many of us are going to have a ton of interesting reading material via your reports. You might as well ask the forums you contribute to for a 2009 only FEH column.

    I did not previously notice the Goodyear tires on the PHEV FEH as I was more attracted to the other features. If you got your hands on one of these for your daily drive, you could say "its a triple digit drive" today.

  10. #9
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    I'm excited that my wife and

    I'm excited that my wife and I agreed to purchase an '09 FEH. We agreed months before my '05 FEH could be ordered 3 1/2 years ago, so now I know to be patient and let my broker do his job. I'll update the groups on my progress and start looking to purchase the '09 Helms shop manuals when they are available. The manuals were a great investment for my '05, and I learned many gas saving tips from them and passed them on in these forums.

    I'm not taking any chances that the SGII will not read SoC in the '09, so I'm getting the new Nav Sys like I ordered for my '05. I'm like John Dixson when it comes to having gauges, you can't have enough. After all, that Nav Sys battery SoC gauge in my '05 helped me become a hypermiler from day one.

    As far as the SCE plug-in FEH, I bet I could get over 200mpg in that baby. Of course Ford would have to change the MTE gauge to read over 3,000 Miles To Empty. What a slap in the face to BIG OIL that would be!

  11. #10
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    Things are looking GOOD for

    Things are looking GOOD for the new '09 2.5L powertrain. Does this mean higher EV speeds?

    Ford Previews Next-Generation Hybrids
    14 February 2008

    by Jack Rosebro

    Speaking at the 2008 SAE Hybrid Vehicle Technology Symposium in San Diego yesterday, Sherif Markaby, Global Core Engineer for hybrids at Ford Motor Company, provided some technical details of the coming 2009 Ford Fusion and Mercury Milan hybrids, due at the end of the year, as well as of the 2009 Escape and Mariner hybrids, which are scheduled to be released in a few months.

    All four hybrids will share a new powertrain that combines a 2.5L inline four-cylinder engine with a series-parallel transaxle. While the basic layout and packaging of the powertrain and related components remains for the most part unchanged from the 2005-2008 Escape component architecture, many of those components have been redesigned for improved efficiency.

    Markaby also noted that Ford has sold 70,000 Escape hybrids to date, and that some units have reached 200,000 miles in service with no service problems.

    The next-generation hybrid system applied in the Fusion, for example, will provide a more than 60% improvement in city cycle fuel economy over a non-hybrid I4 engine, Markaby said, and a more than 80% improvement over a V6 on the city cycle.

    Variable-Voltage Converter (VVC). The new powertrain’s inverter assembly utilizes a DC-DC buck-boost converter, which Ford refers to as a Variable-Voltage Converter, to step up the voltage potential of current from the battery pack before it is synthesized into a three-phase AC waveform to power the transaxle’s two electric motor-generators.

    Every model-year 2004 and up Toyota/Lexus hybrids utilizes a buck-boost converter; however, this is the first time that the architecture has been employed in a mass-produced passenger hybrid vehicle built by another manufacturer.

    Stepping up voltage allows the powertrain to produce a given output using less current, which reduces resistance losses and increases efficiency. It also allows the manufacturer to use a smaller, lighter battery: the 275V, 5.5Ah, 27 kW peak power NiMH battery pack used in the new Fusion/Milan hybrids features improved cell chemistry, and is more compact, for example, than the 2005-2008 Escape hybrid’s 330V battery pack.

    One of the most important attributes of VVC, according to Markaby, is “reducing the cost of the battery.” Previous Escape and Mariner hybrids used a stand-alone air conditioning loop to cool the battery pack during peak operating temperatures: the new powertrain uses only a forced-air ventilation system.

    High-Efficiency Internal Combustion Engine (ICE). The 2.5L iVCT I-4 engine gets variable valve timing on the intake side (Intake Variable Cam Timing, iVCT), as well as a wide-band lambda sensor in place of a conventional oxygen sensor. The compression ratio in the engine is 12.3:1.

    Idle-stop and start events are much quicker, and enable greater efficiency with as many as two times the starts and stops in a given driving cycle as the previous system. The quicker engine shut-downs and pre-positioning (for the next start) also reduces O2 build-up in the engine’s catalyst. Decel Fuel Shut-Off (DFSO) mode and electric-only mode have also been expanded.

    High-Efficiency DC-DC Converter. The conventional DC-DC converter, which steps down system voltage to run the vehicle’s 12V accessory bus and charge the auxiliary 12V battery, has been redesigned to operate at higher temperatures. The unit remains liquid cooled, and can switch at higher frequencies.
    Ford_hybrid_torque
    The VVC variably boosts traction battery voltage to operate the motor and generator more efficiently. Click to enlarge.

    High-Efficiency Transaxle. The maximum RPM of the new transaxle’s permanent-magnet synchronous motor-generators has been increased, and a new low-drag transaxle fluid has been formulated. The higher available voltages from the variable-voltage converter allow greater torque at higher speeds. Typically, such voltages also enable a more efficient recuperation of kinetic energy via regenerative braking.

    Update on the SCE PHEVs. Markaby also made mention of the plug-in hybrid Escapes that Ford is delivering to Southern California Edison (SCE) for V2G research. The PHEV Escapes use a 10kWh Li-ion battery pack, and are getting as much as 120 MPG in testing. The PHEV powertrain operates in three distinct modes: electric drive (ED) mode, blended mode (a combination of engine operation and charge-depleting electric drive), and conventional hybrid mode.
    http://www.greencarcongress.com/2008...reviews-n.html

    GaryG

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