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  1. #1
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    Jan 2008
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    Could use some general info, if u please

    I'm looking at Hybrids and leaning towards a Civic. I'm feeling like a low mileage 03 or 04 might be the way for me to go. 2003 is the first year Civic had a Hybrid model, correct? Does anyone know of any kinks that the 03 model had that were worked out in later models? Are there any substantial improvements that were made in later models (ie HCH 2)?
    Also, i have been warned that servicing and replacement parts are more expensive in Hybrids than in their non-Hybrid counterparts. Is there any truth in this?
    ANY other information you want to throw my way will be greatly appreciated.

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  3. #2
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    to_the_sun: If you can find

    to_the_sun:

    If you can find a low mileage HCH-1, AND you can have it checked by a qualified Honda Hybrid technician then it may end up being a very good purchase.
    Another VERY important factor is a vehicle maintenance history with Honda, if that history cannot be retrieved because the vehicle was serviced by the owner or another unqualified outfit then I would value the car less.
    Anyhow, if these pre-requisites cannot be met in full then I would shy away from it.

    If you select a manual transmission HCH-1, I would look at the state, history and health of the battery pack. Then, I would have to make a conscious effort to drive the car well so that you do not lug it.

    If you select a CVT model then you have to make sure the CVT is in good health and has been maintained properly in the right intervals.

    On both vehicles CVT and manual vehicles, I would check the EGR valve, the emissions equipment (O2, catalytic converter), the 12V electrical system, and ALL the software updates.

    Many of the issues I mentioned for the HCH-1 were addressed by the current model (HCH-2). And yes, there are other substantial improvements in the HCH-2, for example:
    -Improved Performance
    -Improved Fuel economy
    -Improved emissions (now AT-PZEV)
    -Improved Safety (ACE and full perimeter airbags)
    -Improved interior
    -Improved technology and reliability

    Cheers;

    MSantos

  4. #3
    Junior Member
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    What year did HCH-2 first

    What year did HCH-2 first come out?
    What's the best way to go about finding a qualified Honda Hybrid technician?
    And also, from my first post, i have been warned that servicing and replacement parts are more expensive in Hybrids than in their non-Hybrid counterparts. Is there any truth in this?

  5. #4
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
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    The HCH-2 came out in the

    The HCH-2 came out in the fall of 2005 as a 2006 model. The end of the model lineup will occur in 2010.

    For now the best place to find a qualified Honda hybrid technician is at a good dealership. Ask your dealer the "point-blank" question about their proficiency with hybrids and see what they say. Most dealers can only afford to send 1-2 people for this type of training and if they do, they'll like to boast about it. The dealers that don't are obviously hopeful they can succeed on their own and the customer may pay for a larger number of hours just to get a simple problem solved.

    In *some* cases the parts are indeed more expensive, but to offset the extra expense due to the uniqueness, added sophistication and quality of the parts, these are often longer lasting as well. In fact, the total cost of ownership of the hybrid option should be lower particularly if the number of miles is large enough.

    For instance, in a hybrid vehicle, the regular maintenance such as tuneups, brake work and so on, are performed in much longer service intervals. This not only balances out the additional expense but also demonstrates why hybrid vehicles are preferred by Taxi fleets. The main reason why this is so, is because a hybrid vehicle does not place as much stress on the gas engine and hydraulic braking system (as an example) as a non-hybrid car would.

    Cheers;

    MSantos

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