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  1. #1
    Junior Member
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    Jan 2008
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    Help I think I bought the wrong tires.

    I bought my wife some new tires for her 2005 HCH. She HAD stock bridgestone tires and averaged 45 mpg and went 63,000+ miles on them. I bought her the Michelin Destiny tires which were reccomended to me by someone there that I know and Costco reccomended the same tires. Now she is averaging 40 mpg. WTH?!??? They don't sell Bridgestone tires there and I don't know what to do. They have only been on for a month. Can I replace these? Does Discount Tire SELL a good tire for a 2005 HCH? Are KUHMO tires any good? Any help would be appreciated.

    trevenirey@hotmail.com

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  3. #2
    Junior Member
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    Oct 2006
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    I would recommend you first tweak the tire pressure a little. For instance, have a look at the tire specifications regarding the maximum tire pressure. You can see this rating on the sidewall of any tire.

    Once you get this rating value (it can be 44 or even 51 psi), write it down and inflate the rear tires so that the new pressure is 6 psi lower than the maximum sidewall rating. Then you inflate the front tires so that the new pressure is 4 psi lower than the max rating.

    For example: If the max rating for your tires is 44 psi, then you set the rear tires to 38 psi and the front tires to 40 psi.

    What this means is that sometimes we may have to tweak the tire pressures (within safe ranges of course) to offset the added rolling resistance of a tire.

    Cheers;

    MSantos

  4. #3
    Junior Member
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    Nov 2007
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    One thing I have been wondering about is if the increased inflation pressures have any effect when driving in rain or icy conditions. Seems like the extra pressure would lessen the amount of tread in contact with the pavement. I'm asking because we live in the mountains and there are a number of grades with fast curves pitched so water flows across the road when it rains - not unusual for the tires to break free and rev the engine for a brief time - just enough to get your attention. There is also black ice or frost on the pavement from time to time.

    We still like the HCH a lot - the high mpg combined with the tax credit make it seem like a good value - the car just seems to become more likeable with time. I'm sorry to see some of the bitter complaining that has started on this forum - don't really see how our experience could be so different from some of the other recent reports. Thanks for all the good advice, Richard

  5. #4
    Junior Member
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    Oct 2006
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    Richard, you are quite correct in calling attention to that issue. Yes, raising the tire pressure will reduce the rolling resistance and that may not be what we want in dangerous conditions. In the end it is about balance, and some people may want to sport lower tire pressures at the expense of fuel economy. Which is perfectly OK as well.

    For instance, the original tires that the Prius and Civic Hybrid come with are often classified as LRR tires. Even at lower pressures, these are the worst possible tires for driving in adverse conditions. Yes, they are great and help boost the fuel economy but when the bad weather arrives there's is no substitute for better and safer rubber.

    That is why many of us replace the original wheels and LRR tires with winter wheels that sport safer rubber compounds for the winter months. When Spring arrives we just remove the winter wheels and return the original wheels and tires to the car.


    Cheers;

    MSantos

  6. #5
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
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    Food for thought...

    The fact that showing great mileage on the specs causes the maker to use low resistance tires is not a good thing to me.

    I think that safety means a lot more than my wallet - without it there's a good chance that I may not live to make good use of my wallet...

    I think that the tires (as well as brakes and suspension) are the key elements protecting your life in a car. If your engine won't go, well, you wont't go. But if the organs of the car that firm and connect you to the ground are not doing their job well... then there's no point in anything else, because one would probably chose to live without injury, to self, or to others.

    All this to say that go ahead and spend a little more on fuel - being certain that you can go confidently from A to B and survive the perils. Water and Ice (especially the later) tend to be umnforgiving.
    Wider (not by much) tires and deeper grooves help draining the water and a softer rubber, while wearing faster, will help you to grip on ice (or any solid terrain, for that matter).

    Go for safety first.

  7. #6
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
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    My 07 HCH came with Cooper Tires, I assume they were the Rolling Resistance, and they wore through the belt by 20k.(One blowout) Honda accepted responsibility (after me going berserk ) and paid for 50 % of a new set of Bridgestones. They are wearing fine , but my mileage went down from 45 mpg to 40 mpg. I drive conservatively and try never to accelerate over 3 bars, and never floor it.
    I guess it equals out. You can burn rubber or burn gas, cost about the same.

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