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  1. #1
    Junior Member
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    Apr 2007
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    Optimum Tire Pressure

    My '07 HCH and I are approaching 12,000 miles. Last week I raised all 4 tires to 44psi from 40, and in two commutes observed approx a 2 or so MPG increase. I would like arguments FOR and AGAINST inflating tires to the top of their recommended range, and if one should equally inflate front and back. I have been doing some reading online, but would appreciate this forum's feedback.
    I rotate tires every 5,000 miles, and my daily, 120 mile, country interstate commute does not call for quick lane changes or braking. The only weather concern would be the occasional rains in North Central Texas (and they can be real downpours).

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  3. #2
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
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    Stick With The Owners' Manual

    I am sure you will get many replies to your post agreeing with you about tire pressure increase to 44 PSI. I will be in the minority and state stick with Honda's recommendation of 32 PSI. Higher tire pressure equals a stiffer ride and less tread on the road surface. I live in San Antonio; the rains at times can cause hydro-planing; higher tire pressure increases that risk. My lifetime MPG is 47.5 MPG on a 2006 HCH, with tire pressure maintained SLIGHTLY over the recommendation; mine are set at 34 PSI.

  4. #3
    Junior Member
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    Apr 2007
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    Thanks, Thompson
    Safety is the concern I have for posting the question. Hydroplaning is really a fear here, too. Although at 40 psi and rains, I really slow down and am even more cautious.

  5. #4
    Junior Member
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    Oct 2006
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    Folks, I hate to digress here...

    ...But the probability of hydroplaning increases (rather dramatically) as the tire pressures decrease beyond a nominal safe value. Any pressure up to and beyond the sidewall max pressure will not compromise the safety in terms of handling under these and many other conditions. The only issue that would be of concern when inflating the tires to higher pressures, would be tires with defects (such as a prior sub-par puncture repairs).

    In fact, raising the tire pressures to max pressure (and beyond) are common techniques used in many law enforcement fleets as it increases the resistance to hydroplaning as well as increasing vehicular stability under extreme high speed driving routines. Sure, the ability to soak the road imperfections is reduced and the suspension components will be working a little harder in harsher road surfaces.

    The only time that a less inflated tire "may" improve traction is on certain snow conditions but even this scenario is contestable by those of us who drive in snow for 5 months or more.

    Cheers;

    MSantos

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