Ford Unveils 2013 Fusion, Hybrid and Energi

Yesterday Ford revealed its high-mileage, mid-sized 2013 Fusion, Fusion Hybrid and Fusion Energi at the ongoing North American International Auto Show in Detroit.

Economy for the hybrid model is said to be 47 mpg city, 44 mpg highway, beating out the 2012 Camry Hybrid’s 43/39 EPA mpg numbers.

And if that is not enough, the plug-in Energi model is promised to reach 100 MPGe or higher, topping the Chevy Volt and Nissan Leaf.

For power, the hybrid relies on a 2.0-liter 4-cylinder engine (down from the former 2.5 liter) plus electric motor and lithium-ion battery pack, delivering 185 horsepower – about 15 horsepower less than the Camry.

Also being made available are the 2.5 which will be carried over for the base (non-hybrid) model, and a direct-injected 1.6-liter EcoBoost and 2.0-liter turbocharged EcoBoost version.

2013-Ford-Fusion-Energi-01

2013 Fusion Energi.

The 1.6-liter is said to be the most fuel efficient aside from the hybrid versions, offering 26/37 mpg, which edges out the Chevy Malibu Eco.

Ford says the hybrids can travel as fast as 62 mph (100 kph) on electric power assuming a moderate cadence. Pressing the accelerator harder, in typical hybrid fashion, will employ gasoline power.

The Fusion Energi is not expected to get 25-50 miles of all-electric range a la Volt, but it’s believed the car could be good for as much as 21 miles on electric power alone.

The vehicles feature Aston Martinesque styling from Ford’s Evos concept first seen at the
Frankfurt Auto Show in September, and most spectators are saying the Fusion line is visually a winner as well.

The company intends to launch Hybrid and ICE versions this fall, with the Energi plug-in following about five months later.

The Fusion will offer a significant selection of standard and optional features. Included is an updated and reportedly more user friendly version of MyFordTouch and Sync.

13Fusion_07_HR

Safety wise, the vehicles offer eight airbags, including two front knee bags. Also, there is SOS post-crash alert, and as an option is a lane-keeping aid, blind spot information system and active park assist.

Ford CEO Alan Mulally said the company will triple its EcoBoost engine production capacity in North America over the year. Mulally also said the company will release the Mondeo version of the Fusion later this year in Europe (probably in Geneva), and also in Asia later this year.

Ford is banking heavily that these vehicles’ class-leading efficiency and styling will enable this world platform to sell in high volume much like the Ford Taurus was able to when launched over two decades ago.

Source (sister publication): AutoGuide


  • Yegor

    Hybrid version is revolutionary for a sedan since the battery lays flat and does not block access from the trunk to salon!!!

    But it all boils down to price – Ford Hybrids were usually more expensive. So the important question is the price?

  • Yegor

    I wonder how the trunk looks like in Energi?
    Does the battery block access from the trunk to salon?

  • Van

    Certainly looking up at Ford. To my eye, these are great looking cars, and the hybrid mileage leap-frogging the 2012 Camry Hybrid is startling. If they can hold the line on the Hybrid price, i.e only one or two thousand more than the Hybrid Camry, it should sell really well.

    One the plug in front, this great looking plug-in will show up about one year after the Prius PHV, but can a plug-in Camry be far behind the plug-in Fusion?

    Hope springs eternal.

  • Cen

    Not a bad looking offering by Ford…much better than the new Camry. All i see though is Sonata , but with a bit more conservatism here. See if it can go head to head with the Sonata though….the Sonata turbo will own the Ecotec version for sure.

  • JD

    Not bad for a Ford, personally I like the 2012 Camry is better. As for MPG numbers, those are good numbers 47 city/ 44 Hwy for a Lithium Ion Battery as compared to the Sonata/Optima Hybrid which also uses a Lithium-Polymer battery design. To compare it to the 2012 Toyota Camry which is using a Ni-MH battery design and stating the Fusion has superior MPG numbers is hilarious to me. There is a reason Toyota has not put all its eggs into the Li-Ion Batteries and that is Reliability. When Toyota is confident in the reliability and capacity of the Battery technology, they will use it. Picture a Toyota Camry or a non Plug in Prius with a small 2 KWH Li-Ion battery with the 3rd Gen HSD? Considering the quantum jump in Mileage the 2012 Camry Hybrid vs the 2011 Camry Hybrid (43/39 vs 31/33), it would be a safe guess the Camry would be pushing > 50+ City/ <50 Hwy? The Prius would be at >60 City and Hwy?

  • Nelson Lu

    JD, the reliability issue is a legitimate concern, but “Toyota would have higher MPG if only they used lithium too!” is not a valid argument. Toyota made their design decision. Ford made theirs. The end result is that the Fusion’s numbers are higher, and whether the potential reliability issue may make the Camry a better choice or not is beside the point: the Camry, for this generation, will *not* have higher fuel efficiency than the Fusion. It would be like stating, “if the Fusion Hybrid used the same type of gas engine as the Prius it would have better MPG!” (which might be true, but is also irrelevant for the fact that that’s not the direction where Ford chose to go). Not only this, but the Fusion’s design will also have the advantage that it will allow the Fusion Hybrid to have a substantially larger trunk than the Camry Hybrid, which is itself a tradeoff to consider. (Although I don’t know if this will allow the Fusion Hybrid’s back seat to be folded down, unlike the 2010-2012; we’ll have to see when it comes out.) (Besides, given that everyone but Toyota appears to be heading for that direction, it makes one wonder whether Toyota is simply playing too safe with the Camry.)

  • hybridhybrid

    camry hybrid vs fusion hybrid… lithium vs nickel…

    conclusion:

    1. NiMH cheaper to produce than lithium ion, and can provide almost the same job in non-plug in hybrid. if there is really a reliability issue toyota will not use it on the prius plug in

    2. fusion hybrid have better MPG numbers. 47/44 vs 43/39. if you think about it, how many years do you have to drive to show a huge savings? so it all boils down to… how much is the fusion hybrid?

  • FamilyGuy

    I like the offerings that Ford is making. I like the naming across the different models, both a C-Max and Fusion will have a Hybrid and an Energi. You can see where this trend is going.

    But it’s really hard for me to get excited without pricing and more numbers. They could simply be beyond my budget and that would do me no good. Is the C-Max going to have close to the 37 cubic feet of cargo space like my Subaru? Will it have AWD or 4WD? The Escape Hybrid could have replaced my Subaru, but will the C-Max be able to fill those shoes, too?

  • Marco

    The New Ford Fusion is based on the currently availlable Ford Modeo in Europe, the back is still the same kept unchanged, and the front is based on 2007 Austin Martin (held by Ford back then).

    The car looks good, however it seems to be more expensive than a Camry.

    btw Prius + in Europe, similar to the Prius v of the US but with 7 seats, uses litium batts.

  • JD

    Nelson Liu, I personally don’t like comparing apples and oranges. The current FFH with a Ni-MH is more of a apple to apple comparison with the 2012 Camry Hybrid. In actuality this is Toyota’s 3rd Gen HSD in the 2012 Camry, probably the last with using a NI-MH battery. Toyota is experimenting with many different Battery Technologies, so with the reliabilty issues(Instability) of Li-Ion batteries, Toyota has taken a conservative approach when it comes to Reliability and still uses Ni-MH in the 2012 Camry. You call it by choice, I call it by experience with Hybrid Designs(12 years) more than any other automaker combined. They used the Li-Ion battery albeit a small one (15 KWH) on the PHEV Prius because of the tradeoff of faster charging time than a larger one that requires more downtime to charge as in the new PHEV FFH. Personally, I’ll take the 2012 Camry Hybrid over the 2013 FFH any day of the week.

  • Nelson Lu

    JD:

    1. You do realize, when you made the statement that Toyota has “experience with Hybrid Designs(12 years) more than any other automaker combined[]” that Honda Insight came out (slightly) before the Toyota Prius did, right? And that Ford is hardly new to the game, given that the Escape Hybrid came out in 2004?

    2. And you do realize that by claiming that the 2012 Camry Hybrid is comparable to the 2012 Fusion Hybrid, that you’re talking about a new generation of Toyota design versus a 3-year-old Ford design, right? I am driving a 2010 Fusion Hybrid that I bought in April 2009. If a brand new Camry Hybrid only slightly beats the three-year old model that I am driving, I’d say that it’s Toyota that needs to rethink its designs, not Ford.

    3. And essentially, your argument boils down to, “Toyota decided to do it this way, and it must right, any other automaker’s decisions be damned!” You are entitled to have blind trust in Toyota. And no one can, or should, force you to get a Fusion Hybrid over a Camry Hybrid. But simply arguing that Toyota is always going to be right and that we should simply trust whatever Toyota is doing is unconvincing. As I noted above, Honda was first to the market, and now virtually everyone has leap-frogged it in technology. If Toyota doesn’t do some catchup soon, not only Ford, but also Nissan, GM, and Hyundai will leave it in the dust technology-wise. (One major advantage that Toyota still has is its ability to mass-produce hybrids, which no one can come close to matching yet. That doesn’t make its technology better, however.)

  • Charles

    Nelson Lu and JD:

    The Honda Insight came to the USA first, but the Toyota Prius was first out of the gate in Japan. Not that it makes any real difference. Honda and Toyota came out at nearly the same time and Ford was a bit behind.

    As for apples to oranges, the Camry Hybrid and the Fusion Hybrid are both true mid-size sedans that excel in MPGs. That makes it an apples to apples comparison for me. As for reliability, over the last few years it has been the Fusion that has had the highest reliability. Not saying the Camry is bad (OK the V6 was bad for a short time), but the Camry is not better than the Fusion in reliability.

    As for the battery difference, only time will tell. If you live in NC as I do, we can buy the Ni-MH battery Camry or Li battery Fusion or Sonata (for mid-size sedans). For me the Sonata is a non-starter because of the CR rating. The Ni-MH battery is proven to work very well in Fords and Toyotas, not so much in a few Hondas. The Li batteries have a few advantages. Smaller size and lighter weight for the same KWHs is very well known. Another Li advantage is higher current, both in and out. This last advantage for non-plug in hybrids is that the KWH can be smaller and the battery still work as well as a larger Ni-MH battery. A disadvantage of the higher current is that battery temperature management is more important.

    I do not know why Toyota put a Ni-MH battery in the Camry or even more surprising in the USA Prius V, but not the European version. My guess is that Toyota has a large contract to buy Ni-MH batteries and will continue to use them in their standard hybrids, until the contracts are up and they switch to Li like everybody else.

    Bottom line, if the Fusion is priced like the Camry or just a bit higher it will be the better deal. Anyway you look at it the Fusion is most likely going to be the better car.

  • Shines

    << --- Well first of all I am going to have to update my avatar? image. I really like the looks of this new Fusion. As far as the comparison to the Camry. My opinion goes like this: Yes the Fusion wins the MPG battle. I believe both cars are very very close in quality and reliability. Maybe it is a contract issue on the battery with Toyota sticking to NiMH. I suspect (and I have to admit I am basing it mostlly on Toyota sticking with it) there is a better long term reliability factor with the NiMH. As others have stated - time will tell. If the Fusion is priced close to the Camry both will probably do well. (I can't afford either - LOL)

  • JD

    Nelson Liu,

    < "1. You do realize, when you made the statement that Toyota has "experience with Hybrid Designs(12 years) more than any other automaker combined[]" that Honda Insight came out (slightly) before the Toyota Prius did, right? And that Ford is hardly new to the game, given that the Escape Hybrid came out in 2004?">

    To Correct your history, they came out about the same time. Honda’s mild hybrid (Half-Ass) design, just like the GM 2 mode(e-assist) Hybrid wasn’t relevant then and as the market has dictated, it is a loser now. Hate to burst your bubble, but Ford had to license Toyota’s HSD system(2nd Gen) in order to create the the Escape Hybrid or face Patent Infringement. They also had to license the CVT for the Escape Hybrid as well. Ford, like I said has so very little experience with Hybrid vehicles as compared to Toyota. The only reason they are making Hybrids at all is because of this License agreement with Toyota. Read the following and get your facts straight..

    “”Ford engineers realized their technology may conflict with patents held by Toyota, which led to a 2004 patent-sharing accord between the companies, licensing Ford’s use of some of Toyota’s hybrid technology[21] in exchange for Toyota’s use of some of Ford’s diesel and direct-injection engine technology.[22] Ford maintains that Ford received no technical assistance from Toyota in developing the hybrid powertrain, but that some hybrid engine technologies developed by Ford independently were found to be similar to technologies previously patented by Toyota, so licenses were obtained.[22] Aisin Seiki Co. Ltd., a Japanese automotive components supplier belonging to the Toyota Group, supplies the hybrid continuously variable transmission for the Escape Hybrid.”"

    < "2. And you do realize that by claiming that the 2012 Camry Hybrid is comparable to the 2012 Fusion Hybrid, that you're talking about a new generation of Toyota design versus a 3-year-old Ford design, right? I am driving a 2010 Fusion Hybrid that I bought in April 2009. If a brand new Camry Hybrid only slightly beats the three-year old model that I am driving, I'd say that it's Toyota that needs to rethink its designs, not Ford.">

    It isn’t a new generation Toyota HSD, it’s the 3rd gen 2010 Toyota Prius HSD. The 2009 FFH which you own, is Ford’s version of the 2nd Gen HSD they got from Toyota in 2004. It is really remarkable that that Ford could only get 4 MPG more in the city than the 2012 Camry Hybrid, with a Li-Ion Battery Pack? What a joke! They did rethink its design, its called the NS4 which the experts are calling the 6th gen HSD with an 100 MPG min requirement. The fact is it’s one of the Top 10 cars at the Detroit Auto Show.

    < "3. And essentially, your argument boils down to, "Toyota decided to do it this way, and it must right, any other automaker's decisions be damned!" You are entitled to have blind trust in Toyota. And no one can, or should, force you to get a Fusion Hybrid over a Camry Hybrid. But simply arguing that Toyota is always going to be right and that we should simply trust whatever Toyota is doing is unconvincing. As I noted above, Honda was first to the market, and now virtually everyone has leap-frogged it in technology. If Toyota doesn't do some catchup soon, not only Ford, but also Nissan, GM, and Hyundai will leave it in the dust technology-wise. (One major advantage that Toyota still has is its ability to mass-produce hybrids, which no one can come close to matching yet. That doesn't make its technology better, however.)

    I don’t put Toyota on a pedestal as you are insinuating? Toyota has faults(the recalls of 2010), but it is one of the few companies who learn from their mistakes and stress Reliability and Quality in their engineering designs. They maybe conservative in design, not exactly exciting vehicles to drive at the moment, but Toyota Owners like me swear by their vehicles not at, like Owners of other makes. By the way do you know some of the acronyms for F-O-R-D? Found -On-Road-Dead, Fix-Or-Repair-Daily or one from the 90′s, Fix-Or-Rollover-Daily(Ford Explorers). Here is a link with Long Term Statistical Reliability Data you might find humorous?

    http://www.autooninfo.net/

  • Nelson Lu

    JD: I think your rambling response speaks for yourself as to whether you are putting Toyota on a pedestal. No better indictment of yourself than what you yourself wrote.

  • JD

    Nelson Lu,

    It’s OK, in your case the truth really hurts!

  • Shines

    Gosh JD why don’t you tell us how you really feel?! IMHO putting the FORD acronyms in your post is in poor taste. By the way, according to that link to autooninfo you included, the Ford Fusion scores higher that the Camry. (I own and drive a Camry BTW)(I (my family) owns 2 Toyotas, a 95 GEO(Half Toyota) and an ’87 Honda Civic)…

  • JD

    Shines,

    I feel good! Thanks for asking. Yeah, it was 1911 Ford Model T vs a 1911 Camry. You’re right, I don’t know how I missed that one?

  • hybridhybrid

    Automakers will only improve overtime. The acronyms of FORD may be of the past but only time will tell.

    I remember how we used to call Korean cars as Krap cars but hey, they are almsot on par with Japs right now.

    The only thing of note here is the Chevy Malibu eco. GM better revise that crappy hybrid before its too late.

  • Marketing New Jersey

    Wow 7 mpg city, 44 mpg highway is nuts and 100 mpg is un heard of. I can’t imagine with fuel reaching 4 dollars per gallon in NJ not having a a fuel saving car these days.

  • pilot

    Does anybody know if the 2013 camry hybrid is the same as the 2012 camry hybrid ?

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  • tapra1

    But simply arguing that Toyota is always going to be right and that we should simply trust whatever Toyota is doing is unconvincing. As I noted above, Honda was first to the market, and now virtually everyone has leap-frogged it in technology. Premium Freebies

  • Felix Skalski

    Your comment about price is very releavant. Ford could quickly price themself out of the hybrid race if this car comes in highly priced. I have two ford hybrids but they were purchased back when there was a tax credit. This made them more affordable. If and when the new Fusion comes out, it could lead to a market that will quickly dry up because people will not pay for a high price hybrid. I am in the market for a new Ford Hybrid and I will look at the Ford Fusion for 2013. That being said, if it comes in with a high price tag, I will begin to look elsewhere….

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  • zyzy

    Well the best i my mom is she cooks really well like she loved to cook the food that is liked by me.apple slices

  • Tom E

    A bit disappointing that the Fusion H comes with 15 fewer horses than the Camry, but the disappointment quickly fades when you realize a) the hp if offset by superior mpg to the Camry (and Sonata hybrid to boot) and b) the Fusion is a great-looking car (a claim that can be shared by neither the Camry or Sonata).

    As far as price is concerned, I don’t understand the pessimism. I would fully expect this car to be priced comparably to the current Fusion hybrid – starting at $28000 or so and going up to the high thirties fully loaded. Yes, 3K more than the Camry, but the 11 Fusion was generally rated the superior choice over the previous Camry by most automotive magazines. They haven’t said much about the Energi model, but I suspect it’ll be priced less than the Volt as its drivetrain isn’t quite as revolutionary.

    Don’t forget that Honda is re-entering the midsize hybrid market with a redesigned Accord plugin next year as well as VW’s Jetta Hybrid. Hybrid shopping should be a lot of fun!

  • Martha

    The only things I got to say about the plug in are: Where are we saving $$$ (one will save in gas, but one will pay high bill in electric. Also, there is a part one needs to purchase and install, so one can plug in the car for charging (I do not know the name of the part). I have be told this part is very expenses.
    The only thing I see is no air polution. If I am going to buy a hybrid car, I would want to see a saves for me as well as no air polution. Also if you go for a long distance drive, how long before it will go to gas, because one ran out of electric.

    For me the hybrid with the battery.

  • Martha Vazquez

    It depends, if you are person who trade in your car every 3 to 4 years, than a hybrid is not for you. If you planning to stay with the car, than it is good idea to get one. Also, depends on of the price of car as you mentioned.

  • mrvazquez

    The only things I got to say about the plug in are: Where are we saving $$$ (one will save in gas, but one will pay high bill in electric. Also, there is a part one needs to purchase and install, so one can plug in the car for charging (I do not know the name of the part). I have be told this part is very expenses.
    The only thing I see is no air polution. If I am going to buy a hybrid car, I would want to see a saves for me as well as no air polution. Also if you go for a long distance drive, how long before it will go to gas, because one ran out of electric.

    For me the hybrid with the battery

  • Anonymous

    JD

    All Going to say is “I am a proud American who will only purchase cars made in the USA. If I am going to buy a car, my money will stay in America. Some People complaint of not having a jobs, and they are the first ones who go purchasing a cars made outside the states. This applies to other items sold in stores. I have purchased American Cars and I never had any problems with them, but maintenance. At one time American laxed in the quality of their vehicles, but they have inproved dramatically.

  • martha Vazquezz

    JD or other who think the same:

    I do not care what Toyota or other cars that benefit other countries, and I would not even brag about them. I am a proud American who will not purchase any car, but American cars: Ford, Chev, Linc, Chy, GMC and etc. I want my money to stay in the USA, because the more American cars we buy from these companies will increase jobs. I have been driving American car and I never had a problem with them, except that I maintenance (such as changing the oil).

    Some people purchase cars from other countries, where most of the profit goes to them, and than they complaint that there is no jobs. This also applies to products that are made overseas. If more American purchase American made products, their will be more jobs. It maybe more expensive at first. Atleast you know it a better made product, and they do not hire under age kids to work for a cheaper price, like other countries are doing.

    So for me “It American cars and products”.

  • cody chevalier

    i agree with that

  • DRJJJ

    Been burned by Ford way too many times and I’m waiting for the Fusion to come out to drop the Camry hybrid prices a little so I can buy one ! Picky Engineer that’s looked at the Camry Hybrid under a microscope!

  • Mike @ Take This Car

    The design of the 2013 Fusion hybrid definitely caught our attention over at the Take This Car Automotive Blog – check our post on the 2013 Ford Fusion Hybrid.

  • Mike @ Take This Car

    The design of the 2013 Fusion hybrid definitely caught our attention over at the Take This Car Automotive Blog – check our post on the 2013 Ford Fusion Hybrid.

  • PS

    The Ford Fusion in built in Hemosillio
    http://mexicotoday.org/article/ford-invests-hermosillo-mexico-plant
    Ford is investign heavily in this plant which is where all Fusions are built. It is said that this facility is state of art of automates lot of functions..

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  • Namaste

    Nice post, good to know that this Fusion topic is being covered also in this web site.
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