Faraday Future Showing Production-Intended Vehicle at Consumer Electronics Show

Faraday Future will be revealing its first pre-production electric car at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas this January.

News of the upcoming production car reveal came by way of a brand launch event in San Francisco by financial backer LeEco. It was also confirmed in Faraday Future Twitter post from yesterday.

Faraday’s reveal at CES 2017 will come a year after its initial revelations at CES 2016. That event turned out to be a disappointment for industry watchers as the electric supercar concept FFZERO1 was shown without information provided by the startup on what market segments would be targeted.

Along with failing to show off its self-driving electric prototype in San Francisco this week, LeEco was able shed light on what’s next for Faraday Future. LeEco CEO YT Jia was joined on stage by Marco Mattiacci, Ferrari’s ex-Formula 1 team boss and now Faraday’s chief brand and commercial officer.

In conversation, Jia casually mentioned that Faraday would likely use CES 2017 as a showcase for a new electric car. Faraday Future representatives later confirmed this to be the case.

Faraday Future also posted yesterday to its Twitter page confirming the launch and outlined the company’s history:

1. We founded a company. #FaradayFuture
2. We created a concept. #FFZERO1
3. We joined a race. #FormulaE
4. We unveil the future. #CES2017

The electric carmaker recently announced in July a three-year technical partnership with Dragon Racing for the Formula E electric racing series. “Faraday Future Dragon Racing” ran its first race at Formula E’s third season opener, the Hong Kong ePrix, on October 9.

SEE ALSO:  Faraday Future Joins Formula E, Partners With Dragon Race Team

Faraday Future has built up its team to nearly 1,000 engineers and product experts at its corporate headquarters in Gardena, Calif. The company plans to build a $1 billion factory north of Las Vegas. However, that’s been on hold for now over financing concerns, according to USA Today.

USA Today