Faraday Future Gets Green Light to Test Self-driving Cars in California

After receiving a license in Michigan to test self-diving vehicles earlier this month, the mysterious Faraday Future was approved for public road testing in California.

Citing an industry source, an Automotive News report says the company plans to make use of the California Department of Motor Vehicle’s approval by the end of the year.

“Faraday Future plans to begin testing prototype self-driving electric vehicles on California roads later this year after winning approval from the state, an industry source said,” wrote Automotive News.

A spokesperson from the California DMV confirmed that Faraday had been approved to test self-driving vehicles on the state’s public roads on June 17.

The startup electric carmaker has been testing prototype vehicles for the past year at private facilities, according to the source familiar with the company’s program, reports Automotive News.

SEE ALSO: Faraday Future Eyes Michigan to Test Self-driving Cars

For the uninitiated, Chinese-backed Faraday Future broke its stealth mode at the Consumer Electronics show in January with the unveiling of the FFZero1 concept car.

A single seat race car, the FFZero1 is claimed to have 1,000 horsepower produced by electric motors, the ability to exceed 200 mph and accelerate from zero to 60 mph in less than three seconds.

Other than a computer designed vehicle pictured above, the company has yet to reveal the first vehicle it plans to bring to production at its new, under construction factory located outside Las Vegas, Nevada.

It is expected to be a long-range all-electric luxury crossover and likely to have some autonomous features, thus a direct competitor to Tesla’s Model X crossover.

When Faraday begins testing, there will be a lot of hands-off vehicles cruising the Golden State’s highways and city streets.

California has already approved 13 companies to test autonomous vehicles on public roads, most recently two Silicon Valley start-ups, Zoox and Drive.ai. The state also has approved testing by Cruise Automation, which was acquired earlier this year by General Motors.

Other approved companies include Alphabet Inc.’s Google, BMW, Ford, Honda, Mercedes-Benz, Nissan, Tesla, Volkswagen, plus auto suppliers Robert Bosch and Delphi Automotive.

Automotive News