Despite Earlier Reports, Tesla Model 3 Still On Track For 2017 Launch

An earlier article stating that production for the Tesla Model 3 has been delayed is false, according to representatives with Tesla Motors.

The delay was initially reported by insideevs.com, which quoted a presentation by Tesla Chief Technical Officer JB Straubel.

During a presentation last week at the 2015 Energy Information Administration Conference, Straubel shared a slide with the audience illustrating how the cost of electric vehicles will decrease in the next 10 years. A red mark on the slide’s graph indicated where the price of the Model 3 was in comparison.

Tesla Model 3

Labeled “$35K 200 mile-range EV planned for 2018,” the dot appeared to announce a postponement in the Model 3’s delivery.

But no delays exist, said Tesla spokesman Ricardo Reyes. He took to Twitter to correct the article, stating, “Contrary to speculative blogger reports, we still plan to show Model 3 in 2016 and begin production in 2017.”

Tesla Model 3

The slide, a Tesla representative told insideevs.com, was only meant to reference that the carmaker expects “full production” of the Model 3 in 2018.

After experiencing numerous setbacks with the release of the Model X – Tesla’s upcoming battery electric crossover – the company has said that it wants to avoid similar issues on the Model 3.

“We don’t want the delays that affected the Model X to affect the Model 3 so we’ve been quite conscientious about that,” Tesla CEO Elon Musk noted earlier this year. “We want to have super high volume.”

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Other than these dates, few bits of solid information have been released on the Model 3, making the sedan particularly prone to speculative reports. As an example, earlier this month The Times-Picayune wrote that Musk and Straubel said the Model 3 will have a driving range of “at least 250 miles,” significantly higher than it’s expected 200-mile range.

What Musk actually said was that an electric car should be able to drive at least 200 miles in everyday conditions.

“Two hundred miles is minimum threshold for an electric car. We need 200-plus miles in real world. Not 200 miles in ‘AC off, driving on flat road’ mode,” Musk said.

 

(Photo: This image by Auto Express is a photoshopped shrunken Model S but Tesla’s designer explicitly says not to expect Model 3 to look like a smaller Model S.)