Consumer Reports Names Honda Insight as Most Reliable Car

Consumer Reports released results from its annual car reliability survey, and the 2010 Honda Insight scored the highest of any vehicle in predicted reliability. Hybrids dominated the list for reliability—with five of the eight most reliable family cars: Toyota Prius, Ford Fusion Hybrid, Mercury Milan Hybrid, Nissan Altima Hybrid, and Toyota Camry Hybrid.

Among all automakers, Honda was at the top, with every Honda and Acura vehicle surveyed having average or better-than-average predicted reliability. Toyota and Lexus models were right behind, with 98 percent of the models surveyed having average-or-better predicted reliability. Ford secured its position as the only Detroit automaker with world-class reliability.

There were no hybrids on the magazine’s least reliable vehicle lists.

Powerful Combo: Reliability and Efficiency

Earlier this month, the Environmental Protection Agency’s released its fuel economy rankings, in which 9 of the top 10 vehicles for the 2010 model year are hybrid gas-electric vehicles. The Toyota Prius was the leader with fuel economy of 51 miles per gallon in the city and 48 mpg on the highway. Other vehicles in the top 10 include the Ford Fusion Hybrid and its Mercury Milan twin, the Insight and Civic Hybrid from Honda, and the Nissan Altima.

When the EPA and CR rankings are read together, hybrid gas-electric cars establish a dominant status as both the most fuel-efficient and most reliable segment of automobiles.

The annual Consumer Reports reliability ratings are based on a survey covering 1.4 million vehicles leased or owned by subscribers of Consumer Reports. The consumer organization only recommends models that perform well in tests conducted at its 327-acre Auto Test Center. In addition, vehicles must perform well in government or insurance-industry crash and rollover tests in order to be “Recommended.”

The full results of the reliability survey will be published in the December issue of the magazine, which goes on sale Nov. 3.


  • Anonymous

    It’s nice to see that CC can get somethings right, to bad they did not like the Insight this much during their 1st reports.

    Brian

  • Mr. Fusion

    Honda: Make us a 4×4 full-sized pick up truck with your awesome reliability and hybrid drive system.

    Make it look tough, not like a Go-Bot.
    GIve it cab and bed options.

    You will make a lot of money.

  • veek

    Congratulations to the designers, engineers, and workers who made this possible, and to the consumers who had faith in them.

  • alancamp

    Congrats to Ford. 90% of their vehicles scored average or better. The front-wheel-drive Fusion, its Milan twin, and Chevrolet Malibu V6 had higher quality ratings than both the V6 Honda Accord or Toyota Camry.

  • Mr.Bear

    Reliability, affordability, and great mileage… Sounds like a liberal elitist communist conspiricy to me. At least that’s what I anticipate hearing from the Republicans.

  • Nelson Lu

    Reliability alone (and remember this is *projected* reliability) does not make a car a great car. From what I’ve seen, the Insight is pretty terrible in all other aspects of the game (except fuel efficiency, of course, but even there, it isn’t great given how small it is).

  • aggieland

    I have about 7000 miles on my new insight, and no, it is not a GREAT car – but I still love it because it’s what I need for the moment. Is it a whimp accelerating – yes, but I am fortunate in that I do not live in an area where I need whiplash acceleration. The most disappointing thing for me is the ride. It’s OK on most roads but it does get choppy on rough roads. I currently have an Odessey and had a Civic in the past both of which were wonderful vehicles in every aspect. But I have side air bags for my kids, ABS, day time running lights, the CVT is smooth, vey good gas mileage, and zero mechanical problems. In the summer with the A/C on constantly I get 45 mpg (combined highway and city). Now that it’s cooler here in Texas I get 52-54 mpg (again combined – I should mention I leave the car in Eco mode all the time). I know the Prius is a better car, but I just couldn’t bring myself to buy it. My plan is to give the car to my oldest son when he is ready for college (about 6 years from now). By then, we should have many more options in fuel efficient vehicles, but for now my insight more than doubles what I can get (mpg) in my Odessey or subaru SVX.

  • indigo

    I will probably consider getting an Insight for my next car. I have pretty modest driving needs, but I do like efficiency. There’s no way I’m going to pay the $5,000 additional dealer markup that is always associated with buying a Prius.

  • Lost Prius to wife

    aggieland, you actually sound like the Consumer Report reviewer. And as far I can gather from your statements, you probably picked the right car for your needs. We all want the silky smooth ride and amenities of a Rolls Royce or Ferrari at the Honda Insight or Prius price. It is just not going to happen at that price. Just take comfort in the fact that, no matter how bumpy the road or ride, the ICE car or truck next to you is spending a lot more on gas than you are and the gas prices are going back up.

    I also know of a friend’s college son that disappointingly took over his parent’s first generation Prius when they bought their second generation Prius. His disappointment abated when he found that the girls he was dating noticed that he was spending less money and time on his car than the other guys did, and spent more time and money on them. May your son have the same “luck” six years from now.

  • Lost Prius to wife

    indigo, if your dealerships are charging $5K extra for a Prius, order one from a dealership in Colorado. You may have to put down a deposit and wait, but I have not heard of anyone paying more than sticker price. Even flying out here will not cost you $5K and you can toss in a vacation before you drive it home.

  • Nelson Lu

    Lost Prius to Wife wrote:
    “I also know of a friend’s college son that disappointingly took over his parent’s first generation Prius when they bought their second generation Prius. His disappointment abated when he found that the girls he was dating noticed that he was spending less money and time on his car than the other guys did, and spent more time and money on them. May your son have the same “luck” six years from now.”

    It’s pretty unlikely that the Insight will incur substantial *ownership* savings over a Fusion/Milan Hybrid — and believe me, it’ll be much easier, physically, to enjoy the “luck” in the back seat of a Fusion/Milan than the back seat of an Insight…

  • aggieland

    As far as my son’s “luck” 6 years from now – the back seats of the insight do fold down and I had the windows tinted as part of my deal to buy the car – hmmmm… maybe I shouldn’t give the car to my son.

  • indigo

    Thanks for the heads-up. The dealers here in Baltimore totally suck when it comes to buying a Prius. I’ve tried on three occasions and always ended up with something else because I refused to pay a surcharge.

  • Bob Moyer

    This is all nice info, but it applies to new. They all drive out well. What about cars that have been on the road for several years. I drive Buick Park Ave and LaSabre. Both have 100,000+ and drive like new and get 25+ mpg in everyday driving with only routine maintenance. With the job situations today, more people are looking for new.

  • ex-EV1 driver

    Bob Moyer,
    Electric drivetrains lose very little in efficiency over time. Batteries definitely will lose some of their capacity. In hybrids, that will manifest itself mostly in reduced performance, not in lower fuel economy or increased emissions.
    Pure electric vehicles, however, will, of course, be just as clean and efficient at 100k and 200k miles as they were new. This is why I see them as being a greater future than todays hybrids with minimal electric capability.

  • Charlotte Chiropractor

    Honda always made reliable cars and this one is no different. You can put 250K on it and don’t have to worry about it.

  • Insightprius

    My wife and I own a 2007 Prius and a 2010 Insight. While the Prius has a nicer interior, the Insight is more fun to drive and gets better MPG depending on driving style. Both seem very reliable.

  • james123

    the Insight and Civic Hybrid from Honda, and the Nissan Altima. מתווכים

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