Cobham, Jaguar Land Rover and Ricardo To Design Economical Electric Motors

Next-generation electric motors for low carbon emission vehicles are the target of a new collaborative research program to be led by Cobham Technical Services.

The project, “Rapid Design and Development of a Switched Reluctance Traction Motor,” will also involve partners Jaguar Land-Rover (JLR) and engineering consultancy Ricardo UK, and is co-funded by the Technology Strategy Board.

As part of its work in the project, Cobham will develop multi-physics software and capture the other partners’ methodology in order to design, simulate and analyze the performance of high-efficiency, lightweight electric traction motors that eliminate the use of expensive magnetic materials reliant on rare earth minerals, much of which are controlled by China.

Using these new software tools JLR and Ricardo will design and manufacture a prototype switched reluctance motor that addresses the requirements of luxury hybrid vehicles.

The project is one of 16 collaborative R&D programs to have won funding from the UK government-backed Technology Strategy Board and the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS). The total value of this particular motor project is £1.5 million ($2.3 million), with half the amount funded by the Technology Strategy Board/BIS, and the rest by the project partners.

According to Tony Harper, Jaguar Land Rover Head of Research, “it is important to understand the capability of switched reluctance motors in the context of the vehicle as a whole so that we can set component targets that will deliver the overall vehicle experience. Jaguar Land Rover will apply its expertise in designing and producing world-class vehicles to this project, with the aim of developing the tools and technology for the next generation of electric motors.”

Dr Andrew Atkins, chief engineer – innovation, at Ricardo UK, said: “The development of technologies enabling the design of electric vehicle motors that avoid the use of expensive and potentially carbon-intensive rare-earth metals, is a major focus for the auto industry. Ricardo is pleased to be involved in this innovative program and we look forward to working with Cobham and Jaguar Land Rover to develop this important new technology. This will further build upon our growth plans for electric drives capability and capacity.”

The project has a three year timetable, at the end of which improved design tools and processes will be in place to support rapid design, helping to accelerate the uptake of this technology into production. Aside from the need to further reduce CO2 emissions from hybrid vehicles by moving to more efficient and lower weight electric motors, there is an urgent requirement to eliminate the use of rare earth elements, which are in increasingly short supply and have risen ten-fold in cost in recent years. Virtually all electric traction motors currently used in such applications employ permanent magnets made from materials such as neodymium-iron-boron and samarium-cobalt. Since switched reluctance motors do not use permanent magnets, they are believed likely to provide the ideal replacement technology.

However, one of the main challenges of the project will be to produce a torque-dense motor that is also quiet enough for use in luxury vehicles.


  • Roy_H

    “rare earth elements, which are in increasingly short supply and have risen ten-fold in cost in recent years.”

    Wow, I am surprised the cost has risen that much. The only reason China has a near monopoly on this is because they undercut the market for many years. With this price increase, I would expect other rare-earth mines around the world to be scrambling to get back into production. China wouldn’t have had to undercut the competition by even 50% to get the major part of the market, so I didn’t expect the price to go much more than double. Rare earths are really not all that rare.

  • brucele

    Wow,that’s so amazing

  • PatrickPunch

    We at Punch Powertrain made the choice for SR-motors for our hybrid powertrain already in 2006. Already then we foresaw that permanent magnets could become a cost issue.

    We transferred the SR-technology from a partner who was already applying it in machinery for more than 10 years. Our hybrid powertrain will go in production with SR-traction motor and smaller SR auxiliary motors late 2013.

    For more information check our website http://www.punchpowertrain.com

  • PatrickPunch

    We at Punch Powertrain made the choice for SR-motors for our hybrid powertrain already in 2006. Already then we foresaw that permanent magnets could become a cost issue.

    We transferred the SR-technology from a partner who was already applying it in machinery for more than 10 years. Our hybrid powertrain will go in production with SR-traction motor and smaller SR auxiliary motors late 2013.

    For more information check our website http://www.punchpowertrain.com

  • Land Rover TDi2009

    Amazing things here. I am very glad to see your post. Thank you a lot and I’m looking ahead to touch you. Will you please drop me a e-mail?