Charge In One Hour With Brusa’s 22-Kilowatt On-Board Charger

Successful adoption of electric vehicles hugely depends on range and how quickly they can be recharged. Switzerland-based Brusa is making headways in reducing charging times.

Brusa Elektronik AG declared that it is the first company to produce a battery charger for electric vehicles that is capable of operating on a three-phase current with a power of up to 22 kw. Production of this fast charger started this month.

On-board chargers in Europe normally operate with a maximum power of 3.7 kw.

The NLG6 fast charger will be able to fully charge a typical electric car in less than one hour. Cars from a major European car manufacturer equipped with this charger will be available to customers for the first time by end of this year, most likely in October. Brusa would not confirm who this manufacturer is.

Since its foundation in 1985, Brusa Elektronik AG has been exclusively developing and producing powerful and highly efficient power electronics and motors for electric vehicles.

The company’s recent project with Volvo is just one example of Brusa’s work. As part of Volvos electrification strategy Brusa delivered more than 250 complete drivetrain sets that are now powering the Volvo C30 Electric fleet.

Brusa also gained a reputation as a supplier of versatile on-board chargers and is the first supplier to be able to offer a 22 kw charger that fully complies with the stringent standards of the automotive industry.

The new fast charger NLG6 from Brusa is, according to the company, the world’s first charger that operates on three-phase supplies and is small enough to be fitted on-board an electric car.

“It was a big challenge to increase the power of our chargers by six times and not overly exceed the dimensions of standard chargers,” highlights Philipp Matt, head of Engineering at Brusa.

The new NLG6 operates six times faster than today’s on-board chargers and thus reducing the charging time of a typical electric car to less than one hour. “We believe that through the immense reduction of the charging time, the acceptance of emobility will noticeably change,” Matt says.


  • Van

    It seems to me that a 6.6 kw level two on board charger feed by a 240V circuit is all that is needed. Level three 480 Volt three phase chargers should simply port the battery voltage DC to the battery, leaving all the conversion apparatus, and its weight, inside the commercial charging station.

    Even a 85 Kwh Tesla S can be recharged using 240 V level two chargers in about 12 hours, i.e. over night. Whereas this would take being parked next to a 480 V outlet for nearly 4 hours. No sale.

    Why not go to a supercharger and get the job done in about one hour?

  • Mark Petersen

    Hi Van

    In Europe if you charge with 230V you only get 3.7kw
    but if you charge with 400V you normal have access to 11kw or 22kw and sometime 44kw
    so installing a 400V 6.6kw charger is just lame, you might as well utilize all the power

    yes Tesla supercharger is of cause nice to have, but so fare there are non in Europe and they only support Tesla, where this is an option for all EV’s

  • Van

    Hi Mark, I am still baffled. Are you saying 3 phase 400 V service is provided to most residential car garages in Europe? And if this service is not available where folks park their EV’s overnight, then we are back to being parked for hours, stranded at a location where 400 V 3 phase power is available to plug into vehicles.

    Lets talk about two EV’s the Leaf with a 24 KWh battery and the Tesla with a 85 Kwh battery. You could indeed recharge the Leaf in an hour with your 22 kw charger, but it would still take about 3 to 4 hours for the Tesla.

    Bottom line, if you have 120 V available a 3.3 kw charger is all you need, with a 240 V supply, you should have a 6.6 kw charger. Now where you have 3 phase 400 V (Europe) or 480 V (USA) power supply, then a 44 kw or higher charger makes sense. However, unless that level of power is available at home, it makes so sense to have that large a charger “on board” in my opinion.

  • Van

    Hi Mark, I am still baffled. Are you saying 3 phase 400 V service is provided to most residential car garages in Europe? And if this service is not available where folks park their EV’s overnight, then we are back to being parked for hours, stranded at a location where 400 V 3 phase power is available to plug into vehicles.

    Lets talk about two EV’s the Leaf with a 24 KWh battery and the Tesla with a 85 Kwh battery. You could indeed recharge the Leaf in an hour with your 22 kw charger, but it would still take about 3 to 4 hours for the Tesla.

    Bottom line, if you have 120 V available a 3.3 kw charger is all you need, with a 240 V supply, you should have a 6.6 kw charger. Now where you have 3 phase 400 V (Europe) or 480 V (USA) power supply, then a 44 kw or higher charger makes sense. However, unless that level of power is available at home, it makes no sense to have that large a charger “on board” in my opinion.

  • John D.

    Just when we thought the world of connectors for charging stations was settling down to the J1772, here we go again!

    In a gas car, “one nozzle fits all” is a very important factor. Drive any car in, fill it up. If we are going to see mass adaptation of charging stations, the the future looks clouded with adapter cords! Lets not reproduce the world of cell phone chargers.

    Still, technology moves on….

    The J12772 handles 32 amps at 240v, or about 7.7kw. The trick would be to have the car accept the J12772 regardless, and provide a secondary connector for rates above 7.7kw, otherwise, those who are thinking about putting charging stations in may head for the sidelines.

  • Trevor – MyRenaultZoe.com

    “the first company to produce a battery charger for electric vehicles that is capable of operating on a three-phase current with a power of up to 22 kw”

    – is this a valid claim, given that the Renault Zoe can be charged on a three-phase current with a power of up to 43kW? It sounds like old news to me.