Busting the 40-MPG Myth: Only Hybrids Really Reach 40

In recent months, a handful of small gas cars like the Chevy Cruze Eco, Ford Fiesta, and Hyundai Elantra have hit the market as affordable alternatives for drivers seeking hybrid-like fuel economy without the hybrid price premium. Advertisements from Ford, Chevy, and Hyundai have proudly attached the “40 MPG” badge-of-honor to these models in campaigns that are often geared especially to reach a younger, more urban driving demographic. In truth though, there are currently absolutely zero gasoline-only vehicles available in the United States offering EPA-rated combined fuel economy reaching 40 mpg.

So are the carmakers lying? Not really, but the discrepancy between the numbers seen in the ads and the real-world efficiency of those small gas-powered cars reveals that some auto companies are only telling a half-truth.

If you look closely, the 40-mpg claims made in commercials for cars like the Cruze Eco and Ford Fiesta, refer only to highway driving—which is far less taxing on gas cars than the city. The full truth is that the Chevy Cruze Eco for instance, gets 42 mpg on the highway but just 28 mpg in the city, for a combined rating of 33 mpg.

For a number of reasons—such as the use of electric power for low-speed driving and the use of regenerative braking to recapture energy lost while coming to a stop—most hybrids achieve better efficiency in the city than they do on the open road. The Toyota Prius for example, gets a 51 mpg / 48 mpg split, for a combined rating of 50 mpg. Another example: The Honda Civic Hybrid, without waving a banner of some kind of breakthrough, gets 43 mpg on the highway, and 40 in the city.

With more than 80 percent of the U.S. population residing in cities or suburbs, most drivers find that the real-world efficiency of their car more closely resembles its city and/or its combined ratings than its highway number. And as gas prices rise, that difference is becoming significantly more valuable.

The Chevy Cruze Eco may start at about $5,000 less than the Toyota Prius, but even if gasoline prices remain at current levels, the average Prius projects to make up its price premium over the Cruze Eco in a little more than seven years. If the price of gasoline were to rise to $4 per gallon, that period drops to six years. Depending on your budget, how much you drive your car, and what kinds of conditions you typically drive in, this may or may not make the Prius, Honda Civic Hybrid, Honda Insight, and Lexus CT200h—the only vehicles that average above 40 mpg combined—a better value for you.

It’s an undeniable accomplishment—and a sign that the automotive industry has finally become serious about fuel economy—that there are so many 30-plus mpg models available today for less than $20,000. (The MSRP for the Honda Insight, by the way, is $18,200.) Still, for drivers in search of truly superior efficiency—barring plug-in models like the Chevy Volt and Nissan LEAF—you still can’t beat a good ol’ hybrid.


  • Anonymous

    it’s a common trick by the car companies to quote the higher of the hwy/city fuel economy.

    truth in advertising… there should be a rule to advertise both numbers with equal prominence or quote the combined.

  • Anonymous

    By publishing a poorly written article such as this, hybridcars.com has reduced their credibility. Auto companies have always published mileage as highway and city. It wasn’t until hybrid vehicles had better city mileage than highway mileage that this would have been noticed. The car company advertising is valid, this article needs some work starting with the title. Combined mileage over 40 has not been advertised. Very disappointing.

  • Charles

    You can add the 2012 Ford Focus SFE sedan to the 40 MPG club. Ford is reporting that it gets 28/40 MPG. That is only for the sedan with the optional SFE (Super Fuel Efficient) version which is only available as an automatic.

  • Smiley

    Interesting that there is poster to defend such misleading practices of the auto companies. Sigh.

    Also note that the Cruze eco that can attain an EPA rating of 28/42 (city/hwy) is available with manual transmission only. The Cruze eco with auto transmission version is rated 26/37 (according to fueleconomy.gov).

  • Anonymous

    Anonymous said: “Auto companies have always published mileage as highway and city. “

    maybe so, but the lower number is often not emphasized equally as the higher number (e.g. smaller fonts/hidden in fine prints, not stated verbally in commercials, etc)

    the other trick is auto companies produces so many variants of the car, but the fuel economy is advertised for the variant people rarely buys (may be due to unrealistic price or features).

  • FamilyGuy

    “Anonymous” if you’re going to type poorly of this website, have the pride to sign up and use your name. This site has been very informative over the years.

    Advertising is all about the fine print. Always. Personally, my driveway does not double as a highway on ramp, so I always check both the city and highway MPG values. Combined is your own personal formal, I feel. Are you 50% on the highway and 50% in the city? Use your own judgement.

    Again, don’t just drop negative comments and run. Poor form. I like the article.

  • JamesDavis

    I have always felt that the hybrid was one of the biggest scams the auto manufacturers ever came out with; call it hybrid and double its price. So far hybrids can hardly compete with their older parent car, the ICE. I think the hybrid is another one of GM’s little ‘snicker’ to keep America locked into foreign fossil fuel. In less than five years, electric cars, like the Leaf, will leave ICE and hybrids so far in the dust they will never be seen again…except maybe in a collectors show room, and we can convert those demonic gas stations into saintly charging stations.

  • Indiigo

    I do think it’s awesome that there are more efficient than they were a few years ago. The car makers are finally getting with the program.

  • Indigo

    James Davis: Since when do hybrids cost twice as much as an ICE. Compare a Fit Sport to an Insight-II, or a Civic EX to a Civic Hybrid. You’ll see that the Insight doesn’t cost $37k nor does a Civic Hybrid cost $40k.

    The electric cars, however, *DO* cost $40k+. The EVs also do 70-100 miles in-between 8-hour recharge cycles. An EV will have to improve a LOT before they beat hybrids on cost and convenience.

  • Simon Rook

    “So are the carmakers lying? Not really, but the discrepancy between the numbers seen in the ads and the real-world efficiency of those small gas-powered cars reveals that some auto companies are only telling a half-truth.” What hogwash, the numbers quoted are both on cycle, so real world doesn’t come into it.

    If you want real world numbers you’ll see Hybrids plummit compared to gasoline only cars as the operation of the hybrid system is carefully optimised for the cycle and gives significantly less benefit in the real world.

    Simon

  • Indigo

    Actually, I got slightly higher than the EPA number for the majority of my previous hybrid’s lifespan. It was only in the last three months of ownership that the FE dropped. The car lasted 151k miles. I easily beat the EPA number on my Insight-II. (Have you been listening to too much Beck?

  • Shines

    What fun! A very lively discussion. Are the car ads showing 40 MPG highway for the base or a specifically designed model telling a half truth? OF Course They Are!!! They’re Ads for goodness sake! They state and list only the higher highway MPG because that will help them sell cars. Any half intelligent car buyer concerned about fuel economy will know this and know to look at the fuel economy sticker on the car (or research fuel economy to costs) before buying. As far as hybrids being better than standard ice vehicles – next post…

  • Shines

    James Davis, – I have to strongly disagree with you that hybrids are a scam. Once again (sigh) I feel obligated to point out the basic differences. Hybrids cost more because they offer more. The standard gas guzzling ice engine is enhanced by including a large battery and electric motor that either replaces the ice in some situations or assists it (allowing the ice to be smaller). Either way less fuel is needed and fuel economy is improved. Also stopping a standard ice is done by brake pads using friction (wasted heat). Regenerative braking returns the braking energy to recharge the battery which in turn is used to assist the ice. Note in the list above the largest vehicle is the Prius and it gets the best fuel economy (because it is a hybrid).
    Sure EVs may eventually replace ICEs and reduce our dependence on foreign oil and reduce air pollution. That doesn’t make hybrids a scam. The “extended range” Volt’s range is only just over 300 miles. The Leaf and other all electrics are around 100 miles. The Prius’s range on 1 tank of gas is over 500 miles. Hybrids cost more because they’re worth more…

  • BoilerCivicHy

    You know what is sad, well let me tell you, gas is at $3.50 a gallon or better most places, estimates say its going to go back to above $4 a gallon. So the other night I am watching a basketball game, and I keep seeing a Chrysler commercial touting there new vehicle they are coming out with, do you think it was a new hybrid? maybe a new fuel efficient min-van? how about a mid-size car that gets a combined 40mpg? Nope, the geniouses at Chrysler decided what we need is a brand new version of the Durango. I want you to know this epotomizes what is wrong with American car companies and why they are getting their butts kicked by foreign car companies. I just want to know why my tax dollars were spent to save a car company that continues to produce monstrosities like the Durango? I was a huge Chrysler fan in the past, but I am sorry I may NEVER buy another Chrysler for as long as I live, since Chrysler obviously does not care about the consumer, the economy, or the environment.

  • JamesDavis

    “Indigo”, I don’t know where you are getting your stats, but the all electric car does not cost 40k. The GM Volt hybrid cost 40K, and it is not an electric car, and all the rest of the idiots followed GM’s lead and raised their hybrids to equal that price. Secretary of Energy Chu said that within less than five years we will have a battery that will hold a super charge and can be charged in less than 15 minutes and under the right conditions will be able to get close to or over 1,000 miles per charge. I will believe Secretary Chu before I believe any of you oil drinkers and I believe that Telsa and Nissan will be the first to have that battery. Secretary Chu said that GM is in line for the battery first, but GM will set it up on the shelf like they did the hydrogen fuel cell battery on wheel and substitute it with a lesser battery so you will continue to get stuck in the back with those roller coaster gas prices.

  • Matt Chatham

    I work in advertising, so while I don’t blame the car companies for advertising in the most attractive way they possibly can, I would support legislation that makes it illegal for a company to only advertise a half-truth like highway-mpg only. Either list both numbers, or the combined. What the attorney general says goes, so I do think it’s a shame people might be getting the impression a new Elantra’s going to get the same mpg as my Insight.

    And Simon, it’s been my (and most people’s I’ve seen online) experience with the the Insight that it gets better MPG than the EPA claims. Some have said this is due to them not being allowed to test it with the ECON mode on but I can’t confirm that.

  • Indigo

    EVs may very well be able to be recharged in just fifteen minutes in the 5-year time horizon you cite. right now, however, they cannot. Likewise, the battery technology of TODAY offers about a 100 mile range. The Tessla costs $105,000. the Volt costs $41,000. The Leaf costs about $38,000.

    My Insight-II cost me $17,588. I get about 450 miles out of a 9 gallon tank. It is surely not a scam. It also didn’t slap the taxpayer for a $7,500 corporate welfare check (unlike the Leaf/Volt).

  • Anonymous

    I think back in early nineties, the big three and the federal gov’t created the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV): whose primary goal was to develop a vehicle that achieves up to three times the fuel economy of cars of that time–about 80 miles per gallon (mpg).

    Sigh. I am still waiting for a road legal vehicle from any of the remaining domestic two-and-a-half with 80 m.p.g.

    Under the Bush administration, the high-mileage program was abandoned for development of hydrogen fuel cell vehicle.

    Sigh. I am still waiting for a road legal hydrogen fuel cell vehicle of tomorrow available for sale from the domestic two-and-a-half.

    Now, the government once again changed direction and abandoned fuel cell vehicles for electric vehicles.

    Is it same old same old?

    Shall I bet that “within less than five years we will have a battery that will hold a super charge and can be charged in less than 15 minutes and under the right conditions will be able to get close to or over 1,000 miles per charge”? Haha.

    Fool me once, shame on you. Fool me twice, shame on me. Am I going to be fooled for the third time?

  • Anonymous

    Simon Rook says:

    “If you want real world numbers you’ll see Hybrids plummit compared to gasoline only cars as the operation of the hybrid system is carefully optimised for the cycle and gives significantly less benefit in the real world.”

    that may be true for ALL vehicles before epa adjusted their testing standards in 2008. the variation was higher for hybrids since they are more sensitive to driving inefficiencies.

    after the 2008 change, i find the ratings for all vehicles are fairly reasonable and can often be exceeded without too much effort.

    for real world numbers, see http://www.fueleconomy.gov.

  • Anonymous

    Or go to Fuelly dot com and find out what’s the real world mpg.

  • Charles

    I noticed that the gasoline ICE only cars listed in the article got a combined 33 MPG (except for the really small Smart). So I looked at the EPA site for hybrids that got around 33 MPG combined. The Camry and Altima are both 33, the Escape FWD is 32, the CR-Z (manual) is 34, and the Lexus 250h is 35.

    So to me it looks like the new ICE only 40+ MPG (33 combined) cars are getting close to or matching the hybrids that are a size class larger. So if you are on a tight budget and really want a high MPG car, the new cars listed would be a really good deal. The Cruze and Elantra have the same or larger passenger volume as the Prius and a trunk about 40-50% bigger than the Camry or Altima hybrids.

    As I posted back in January, this year is going to be really hard to predict the sales of hybrids. The new Civic, Focus, Cruze, Elantra and Fiesta are really going to suck some sales from the hybrids, with the exception of the Prius.

  • Dom

    I didn’t read all the comments, but I would argue that for many people the hwy rating is what IS going to matter more. I suspect that most miles a car see are accumulated on interstates and beltways around cities, which is where you’ll see the hwy rated fuel economy. Sure you won’t get as much in town, and if that’s where you spend all your driving, maybe a hybrid might be better. But that’s not the case for many. I’d personally take a much cheaper Cruze Eco with the manual transmission over a hybrid. Of course, I’d take a diesel over either which is even better for hwy cruising…

  • LadyPenzance

    I’m glad I came across this discussion because I’m trying to convince my husband that we should buy a hybrid. The only thing that I’m hesitant about, besides the price, is the cost of the battery. Can someone shed some light on that for me? How long or far does the battery of say, a Prius last and how much does it cost?

    Thanks

  • Anonymous

    Dom said: “I suspect that most miles a car see are accumulated on interstates and beltways around cities, which is where you’ll see the hwy rated fuel economy. [...]“

    1. Many more live in urban/suburb area than real rural area.

    2. Even if the statement is true, the biggest waste in fuel efficiency lies in city/suburban traffic, traffic lights, stop signs, stop and go, waiting to turn left, rush hour traffic that causes one to slow down and accelerate on highway for no particular reason.

    For comparison, a Prius, which has the best EPA city mileage estimate – 51 m.p.g., is 78% more fuel efficient than the non-hybrid gas engine four door models listed above, which get 28 or 29 m.p.g.

    For EPA highway mileage estimate, Prius is rated 48 m.p.g., still 18% better than 40-42 m.p.g. of non-hybrid gas powered four dour models.

    Even if one drives 80% highway, 20% city, one still save more fuel in city driving than in highway driving by picking a Prius instead of other non-hybrid ‘high-mileage’ model.

  • caffeinekid

    @ LadyPenzance, the Prius (as well as other hybrids and EVs in general for the most part) “limited battery life” claim is an urban legend. Go to priuschat dot com and search the threads for more information than you could ever want on the Prius.

  • Anonymous

    The problem is not some automakers only boast the EPA highway mileage est., the mileage they quote is only applicable to one variant of the model being advestised.

    For the non-Eco models from Ford and GM: (from fueleconomy.gov)

    Chevy Cruze 1.8 M6 26/36 (city/hwy) [14% worse hwy mileage]

    Chevy Cruze 1.8 A6 22/35 (city/hwy) [17% worse hwy mileage]
    Chevy Cruze 1.4 turbo A6 24/36 [14% worse hwy mileage]

    Ford Fiesta M5 28/37 [8% worse hwy mileage]

    Ford Fiesta A6 29/38 [5% orse hwy mileage]

  • Anonymous

    I would also add:

    2012 Ford Focus SFE (A/T only) 28/40 (city/hwy)

    2012 Focus M/T 26/36 [10% worse hwy fuel consumption]
    combined 31 mpg
    2012 Focus A/T 28/38 [5% worse hwy fuel consumption]
    combined 30 mpg

  • Anonymous

    there is one poster who try to compare the Cruze or Elantra against vehicles of one size class larger, are you serious?

    EPA interior room
    Cruze 94 cu.ft.
    Elantra 96 cu.ft.
    Camry 101 cu.ft.

    No matter how EPA measures, the rear seat of Cruze is much less inhospitable, and more difficult to enter or exit the rear, than a Corolla. Just not comparable to Camry or other mid-size sedan.
    For Elantra, the rear seat headroom is lacking for adults.

  • AP

    Not only do hybrids like the Prius get much better mileage than smaller and lighter cars, but they have the potential to get even more mileage due to the various areas where energy is stored–regenerative braking, gas engine recharging the batteries, etc. Road and Track, for example, got 67 MPG with the Prius in mixed suburban driving: http://www.roadandtrack.com/tests/comparison/hybrid-reality/page_3_-_reality_page_3
    Even more important, hybrid batteries are rock-solid, despite worries they’d weaken long-term and return lower MPG. Consumer Reports recently reported that 10-year old Priuses give the same MPG as new Priuses: http://www.favstocks.com/cr-old-toyota-prius-hybrids-still-a-good-buy/2434578/

  • AP

    Not only do hybrids like the Prius get much better mileage than smaller and lighter cars, but they have the potential to get even more mileage due to the various areas where energy is stored–regenerative braking, gas engine recharging the batteries, etc. Road and Track, for example, got 67 MPG with the Prius in mixed suburban driving: http://www.roadandtrack.com/tests/comparison/hybrid-reality/page_3_-_reality_page_3
    Even more important, hybrid batteries are rock-solid, despite worries they’d weaken long-term and return lower MPG. Consumer Reports recently reported that 10-year old Priuses give the same MPG as new Priuses: http://www.favstocks.com/cr-old-toyota-prius-hybrids-still-a-good-buy/2434578/

  • Joy in Seattle

    Simply by publishing EPA numbers you’ve discredited yourselves. Everyone knows that the real world mpg for hybrids is significantly lower than EPA estimates.

  • Charles

    Dear Joy in Seattle,

    I typically get 50 MPG highway on a 2006 Prius which is rated at 45 MPG by the EPA. I have gotten as high as 52 and as low as 48. The EPA rates the car at 48 city, which is about what I get.

    On the EPA web site the average MPG for 141 2006 Priuses is 47.7 MPG, which is 1.7 MPG above the combined EPA rating.

    So not everyone knows that the real world mpg for hybrids is significantly lower than EPA estimates.

  • Anonymous

    Joy in Seattle says:
    “Everyone knows that the real world mpg for hybrids is significantly lower than EPA estimates.”

    this statement is misleading because i know lots of hybrids are significantly higher than the epa estimates. a more accurate description is hybrids generally has a wider variations than epa estimates, but averages out close to epa numbers.

    of course, if you are going to drive inefficiently (e.g. not properly inflating your tires), hybrids tends to be more sensitive. everybody knows that!

  • caffeinekid

    @Joy: Unless you were attempting to be funny by employing sarcasm, I suggest you not post until you know what you are talking about. The EPA estimates on hybrids are at least as accurate as for traditional ICE vehicles. And as others have mentioned- many (including myself) get higher mileage than the EPA claims. Now, if you want to talk about manufacturer propaganda for certain ICE cars with alleged 40+mpg highway ratings, that would be a whole other issue.

    @Anonymous: hybrids are no more or less “sensitive” to driving inefficiently than ICE cars.

  • Anonymous

    Truth is that these go-cart cars get close to hybrid mileage and the Hybrid people are quite affronted by these facts.

  • Josegaut

    I don’t own an hybrid, but my Fiat Punto Evo (1.3 liter, turbo diesel engine) achieves 49 mpg in combined rating, which is better than most hybrids presented in the above table. And this is a “real life” figure by an actual owner.

    If the figures in the table are provided by the car companies themselves (they are generally lower than what you can really achieve in real life), then I’m surprised that most of them are still higher than what I can realize with my non-hybrid car.

  • Dkerr

    JamesDavis: You obviously have a distorted and bizarre anti-GM perspective. You should seek help with your obsession.

  • caffeinekid

    @Anonymous: The “truth” is that there is no class known as “hybrid people”, so the rest of your assertion is false as well.

    @Josegaut: With the exception of the Jetta, the fuel classes of these vehicles and the Punto Evo are not the same. Sure, the Evo is a great little car, but you cannot equate European standards with those in America. The closest car of comparable engine class, size, power and MPG sold in the USA is the VW Golf TDI, which actually conforms to the US EPA standards- something that cannot be said about Fiat’s diesels.

  • Anonymous

    @Josegaut, I think before we discuss further about mpg in the U.S. and mpg in Europe, it is best to first understand the gallon (Imperial gallon) in Europe/U.K./Australia is about 20% more than U.S. gallon. (You can check with various online sources.)

  • josegaut

    Thanks for the precision, that’s the reason why I had used the U.S. gallon to make my conversion from liter/100 km to mpg ;-)

  • Anonymous

    According to media reports, a good number of Ford Fiesta owners have been complaining with NHTSA and on forums about the dual-clutch automatic transmission, PowerShift transmission, which is built in a joint venture by Ford in Mexico, causing its owners headaches.
    Some owners have complaied about hard shifts, while others have spoken out about the transmission not shifting up at all at higher speeds.

    A few customers reported Ford has been replacing the transmission. In a case, the Fiesta just would not engage drive after the owner reversed it, with the defect occuring after just 10 days of ownership. Ford said they would have to replace the entire transmission, but since none are in the country, the customer has been waiting for two-weeks.

  • Ryan

    Personally hybrid or not I will never buy a new vehicle, I bought my 1991 Pontiac firefly for $1000 safetied it for $500 then completely rebuilt the motor for $800 and I can do it all my self. it gets religiously 49 mpg/ highway (us gallon) costs me no more than $45 in premium to fill regardless of gas prices, and for commuting I go a month between tanks I get at the very worst 600 km to a tank and the most I have ever put into it is 35L. Yes I hate the size but it gets the job done, I would much rather drive my old truck but the GF overheated it for 75km highway did I mention I rebuilt that motor too. 84 gm stepside shortbox 350 dyno’d at 400 HP at the rear wheels 110 mph in a 1/4 mile in 11 seconds flat naturally aspirated carburetor and it got faithfully 25 MPG far better that any truck on the market considering the power output. Any ways I hate when I see hybrid desegnated parking front and center when my clown car gets better mileage than 90% of them

  • ted johnson

    Bogus, I just put 262,000 miles on the first hybrid ( Insight 1) and averaged 62 lmpg with summertime tanks all over 70 mpg. The hybrid is a bridge to the electric car – only if battery energy storage technology gets 5-10 times better. My present Prius has 30,000 miles on it with a pump average of 57 mpg. These cars pay for themselves in gas savings. My first hybrid ended up free for me, paid for with gas savings over a straight ICE. This one will too.

  • arizonataylor
  • tapra1

    Hyundai have proudly attached the “40 MPG” badge-of-honor to these models in campaigns that are often geared especially to reach a younger, more urban driving demographic.Host News

  • katarinarichard9

    A good blog always comes-up with new and exciting information and while reading I have feel that this blog is really have all those quality that qualify likes blog to be a good on.
    Cell phone spying

  • roui0105

    Well, almost all car companies are giving so much effort on how they can give their consumers a good service with better fuel efficiency. In fact, In fact, Ford Motors seems to be in creating and implemented brand new technologies to lower fuel usage. Now, the nation’s second biggest automaker said it will now be dedicating its red-brick 285,000 square foot research facilities in Dearborn, Mich., to developing more affordable fuel-saving technologies.

  • nyasiataylor55

    Ive been significance to study this and just never acquired a opportunity. Its a problem that I’m amazingly considering, I just began examining and Im grateful I did. You are a excellent blog writer, 1 of the best that Ive seen
    free cell phone spy

  • Ron-Riverview

    Every single Prius owner commenting so far appears to get exceptionally good fuel efficiency (approximately 47 mpg minimum). I have been reading numerous independent articles where people say that many of the ICE cars which are rated at 40+ mpg are falling short. The problem is that all of the manufacturers fine tune the cars to deliver the best possible fuel economy on “the EPA Test”. And, that’s what I expect them to do.
    Also, the industry has been trying to develop a better battery for about 50 years now; the batteries are probably as good as they are going to get in the near future.
    I see the ICE manufacturers fine tuning their products to get the most bag with the least amount of technical innovation ($$). The truth is that the best way to achieve high mpg is with smaller vehicles with smaller engines. In 1981, I purchased a Toyota Starlet which had an EPA highway rating of 54 mpg. I always got at least 50 mpg on the highway and averaged about 45 mpg over-all. That car had a 1.3 liter normally aspirated engine (no fuel injection).
    There is insufficient infrastructure available for all electric or fuel cell vehicles to allow for cross country travel. therefore, these cars will always be limited to local, around town use. However, the good news is that you can rent an ICE vehicle relatively inexpensively (unlimited mileage) for longer hauls. I rented a Camrey in Chicago last year for less than $22/day. You could do that 12 times per and drive your all electric (100+ equiv. mpg) vehicle just around town.
    Peace!

  • ariasandy

    I am really not too familiar with this subject but I do like to visit blogs for layout ideas. You really expanded upon a subject that I usually don’t care much about and made it very exciting. This is a unique blog that I will take note of. I already bookmarked it for future reference.
    cell spyware

  • hania koplan

    The full truth is that the Chevy Cruze Eco for instance, gets 42 mpg on the highway but just 28 mpg in the city, for a combined rating of 33 mpg. text spy

  • Jone Raj123

    The post is written in very a good manner and it entails many useful information for me. I am happy to find your distinguished way of writing the post. Now you make it easy for me to understand and implement the concept.

    Massage Table

  • Jone Raj123

    I have been in look for of some information about it almost three time. You served me a lot indeed and analyzing this your publish I have found many new and useful information about this topic.

    Massage Table