108 City MPGe Rating For C-MAX Energi

The all-new Ford C-MAX Energi is now rated America’s most fuel-efficient plug-in hybrid with an EPA- certified 108 miles-per-gallon equivalent (MPGe) city rating and 100 MPGe combined rating.

Ford states that over the course of five years, C-MAX Energi customers could save nearly $7,000 compared with the average new vehicle, according to the federal EPA label.

Comparative savings could go even higher if the current trend of rising gas prices continues.

The C-MAX Energi’s 100 MPGe combined rating is 5 MPGe better than the Toyota Prius plug-in hybrid’s combined.

With a starting price of $29,995, after federal tax credit and including destination and delivery costs, C-MAX Energi is expected to be America’s most affordable plug-in hybrid.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency rating places the C-MAX Energi in a small group of production vehicles that have received EPA ratings of 100 MPGe or greater.

“Ford is giving customers the power of choice for leading fuel economy regardless of what type of vehicle or powertrain technology they choose,” said John Davis, chief nameplate engineer, C-MAX Energi. “With $5-per-gallon gasoline, C-MAX Energi customers essentially will pay $1.25 per gallon for the same distance traveled compared with average vehicles estimated to achieve 23 mpg.”

The C-MAX Energi joins the C-MAX Hybrid as part of Ford’s first hybrid-only dedicated line of vehicles. The C-MAX Hybrid, available in dealerships this fall, and Ford’s press release says the car is now officially EPA-certified at 47 mpg city, 47 mpg highway and 47 mpg combined.

This number is not to be confused with the “Energi” plug in, which gets 43 mpg in charge sustaining mode.

“The C-MAX Energi plug-in hybrid’s gas-operation, hybrid-mode (aka charge-sustaining mode) combined fuel economy is 43 mpg, said Ford Electrified Vehicles Communications Manager, Wesley Sherwood III today. “The 47 mpg refers to the C-MAX Hybrid’s combined efficiency.”

Many of the innovative technologies in C-MAX Energi are shared across Ford’s electrified vehicle lineup and draw from the automaker’s portfolio of about 500 patents related specifically to hybrid technology.

Further, the C-MAX Energi is projected to deliver 15 class-exclusive features.

13CMAX_Energi_Cutaway-LR

Among the standard and available features listed by Ford are:

• SYNC with MyFord Touch offers multiple ways – including voice commands – for customers to manage and control their phone, navigation, entertainment and climate functions. Plug-in hybrids and all-electric models have additional options for monitoring information like battery state of charge

• MyFord Mobile, available for C-MAX Energi in early 2013, enables access via smartphone or Web-based interface to perform key tasks, such as monitoring a vehicle’s state of charge and current range or locating charge stations and planning routes to find them

• SmartGauge with EcoGuide provides in-vehicle customizable displays, including instantaneous fuel economy readings and coaching functions to help drivers understand and optimize their fuel efficiency

• ECO Cruise saves vehicle energy by relaxing acceleration compared to standard cruise control

• EV mode button – conveniently mounted in the center stack – allows a driver to switch vehicle operation between three modes: all-electric, normal hybrid operation, conserve battery power for later use

• Regenerative braking is capable of capturing and reusing more than 95 percent of the braking energy normally lost during the braking process

• Hybrid transmission, designed by Ford engineers in-house, is capable of operating at high speeds and in a smooth, fuel-efficient manner at the same time

• Advanced Lithium-ion batteries used in Ford’s electrified vehicle lineup – covered by an eight-year/100,000-mile component warranty – are smaller and lighter than nickel metal hybrid batteries used in previous generation hybrids

• Charge port with LED light ring (for electric and plug-in vehicles) is conveniently located on the driver’s side and near the front of the car and features a light ring that illuminates to indicate charge status


  • Van

    Lets see, the Volt is rated at 93, the PIP at 95, and the C-max Energi at 108? Then we have the Volt EV range of 38, the C-Max Energi at 19, and the PIP at 11. Finally we have the PIP extended range MPG at 50, the C-max at 47 and the Volt at 37.

    If we look at price, we have $40,000 for the Volt, $33,000 for the C-Max Energi, and $32,000 for the PIP.

    Now we can at least understand why the good doctor Dennis threw the Volt under the bus and drove away happy in the C-max!

  • Mike Young

    okay what about the reliability of the Ford?

    also how much more quickly do the batteries wear out when plugging in is the primary method of charging as opposed to traditional hhybrid charging???

  • Van

    Volt 93 MPGe combined, PIP 95 MPGe combined and C-max Energi 100 MPGe combined.

    Also the link indicates the C-Max Energi will get 43 MPG vice the 47 achieved by the C-Max hybrid, but the numbers still play out in the same order, 50, 43, 37.

    If we compare the size, we find the Volt passenger volume at 90 vice 99.7 for the C-max, and the cargo volume at 18 cu ft for the Volt vice 24.5 cu. ft for the C-max.

  • Van

    Oops, lets also look at rear seat room. Rear seat head room for Volt, 36, for the C-max 39 and rear seat legroom, 34.1 for the Volt, 36.5 for the C-max. Any way you slice it, with the C-Max, size matters.

  • Jeff Cobb

    Van and USB – Thanks for the correction – We called Ford and updated the info about CS mileage.

    The press release said nothing about 43 mpg as you can now see linked in the article .

    Regards,

    Jeff

  • Jesse

    @usbseawolf,

    I’m pretty sure that the 43MPG rating is only his opinion and not EPA rated. I have been trying to find out where he got that but have been unsuccessful so far. The source articles from Ford and Reuters did not have it either, so I am a little leery of taking this number as fact as of right now.

  • taser54

    Volt has 98 MPGe rating. As for the pure electric range of the Cmax, it’s going to be difficult for the maintain the claimed EV range with only a 7.5Kwh battery with no provisions for a battery reserve to draw upon as the battery ages.

  • Modern Marvel Fan

    So, C-Max Energi model lost its 47MPG down to 43 MPG with extra battery weight.

    Pip gets better gas mode MPG and Volt gets the BEST EV range and performance. C-Max Energi is right in the middle.

    Now, how about performance?

    It is probably rated in this order: Volt has the best performance, then C-Max Energi, then Prius Plugin.

    Now, we have all the choices. But with the price, I would say that C-Max Energi is way better buy than Prius Plugin.

  • Modern Marvel Fan

    @ Van (AKA a Volt basher with political agenda)

    You wrote: “Volt 93 MPGe combined, PIP 95 MPGe combined and C-max Energi 100 MPGe combined”

    So, you are using 2012 Volt rating against 2013 Energi rating? But yet you wrote that Volt has 38 miles EPA rated electric miles.

    2013 Volt is rated 98 MPGe vs. 2013 C-Max Energi’s 100 MPGe with A TRUE EV mode.

    C-Max’s EV mode is NOT 19. PIP’s EV only mode is 6 miles rated by EPA. Volt is 38 miles. That is the major difference.

    List the facts, please.

    I congratulate Ford for doing a great job at entering the Plugin market. Now, let us see some real world comparison tests…

  • CharlesF

    About the 43 MPG number. I looked at Ford’s range prediction and came up with the same 43 MPG value. Ford under promised for the C-Max and Fusion Hybrids and I hope the same is true for the plug ins.

  • Van

    Yes I was wrong to report the Volt at 93 MPGe, rather than 98 MPGe. Still less than the combined 100 MPGe of the C-Max Energi. But on the other hand, I was right to report 47 vice 43 MPG for the C-Max Energi as the updated article link now states.

    So how far can you drive on a tank of gas? 380 miles for the Volt, near 571 Miles for the Energi.

    Bottom line, the Ford C-Max Energi is the most fuel efficient plug in vehicle in America, eclipsing the Volt in just about every way possible. Bigger, cheaper, and higher mileage. Ford has hit a home run. Can’t wait for the Fusion Energi which should also eat the Volt’s lunch.

  • Volume Van

    Wow, that’s great. C-Max Plugin bests both Volt & PIP. It has 20 mile range that is better than Prius PIP and certainly it has lot more interior space than both the cars.

    Ford has chosen the right model for Hybrid & Plugin. BTW, the C-Max Hybrid has already been launched and it sold 969 units last month.

  • Modern Marvel Fan

    @Van,

    You said: “Bottom line, the Ford C-Max Energi is the most fuel efficient plug in vehicle in America, eclipsing the Volt in just about every way possible. Bigger, cheaper, and higher mileage.”

    Again, you have painted a “partial” picture. I agree that it is bigger, cheaper, and higher mileage”. However, That is NOT “every way possible”. Performance? Quietness? Smoothiness? EV range? Not everyone buy a fuel efficient car for its share MPG. 100 MPGe vs 98MPGe in real world is negliable difference. However, the performance in handling, braking and acceleration is significant.

    Don’t forget that Volt gets slightly less MPGe due to its weight which is mostly consisted of the battery. That battery is what gives Volt its EV range. Volt is designed to be EV first, hybrid second. Unlike other Plugin Hybrids. That is why it is called EREV.

    Fact: In EV range alone and EV performance alone, Volt crushes C-Max Energi.

    Also, something to EDUCATE you about efficiency and EPA testing.

    EPA testing loop is consisted of a 11 miles testing cycle. So, within the “EV mode”, Energi is ONLY 2 MPGe better. However, once you go outside Energi EV range, its MPGe will drop fast in comparing with the Volt.

    In the miles between 11 and 40, Volt’s MPGe number will stay the same, but Energi’s MPGe number will drop SIGNIFICANTLY. Especially if its EV only range is 20 miles and the next 20 miles is 43 MPG. So, you will have an average of 72 MPG in that range.

    75% of American drive less than 40 miles per day. In those situation, Volt is more efficient.

  • CharlesF

    Here is a bit more about the MPG and range of the C-Max Energi:

    According to a recent story at MotorTrend the C-Max Energi will have a total range of at least 550 miles according to Ford. Using the EPA range calculation that the combined MPG of the Energi in hybrid mode would be the following:

    (550 – 20) / (14 * 0.9) = 42 MPG

    That is 550 miles total range, minus the 20 miles all electric range divided by 90% of the capacity of the 14 gallon fuel tank. The 90% figure is what the EPA uses for its range calculation.

    The EPA uses 33.7 kw-hr as the equivalent of a gallon of gasoline. So using the following:

    7.6 / 33.7 * 100 = 22.55 miles max EV range

    7.6 is the kw-hr rating of the C-Max Engeri’s batteries, divided by the EPA’s gallon equivalent, times the EPA’s MPGe rating for the C-Max Engeri. So if the C-Max Energi does get an EPA 20 mile all EV range rating, that would mean that Ford is using 89% of the battery capacity:

    22.5 / 20.0 = 0.89

    Lots of assumptions, but the math is correct.

    If you are wondering, the total range of the C-Max Energi would have to be 612 for it to get the hybrids 47 MPG.

    For the math purists, I know I do not the the parentheses around the tank volume and usage ratio, but it makes it easier to read.

  • CharlesF

    I guess I have too much time on my hands tonight. I looked at which of the three affordable plug ins are best depending on my driving habits and miles driven per day. Following are the results:

    The Volt uses the least amount of gasoline up to 115 miles per day. After 115 miles per day the Prius plug in is the most efficient. The C-Max never beats the Prius and the Volt at the same miles per day but is better than the Prius up to 76 miles per day and beats the Volt after 149 miles.

    As for my driving, broken down to six different distances per day I come up with the following gas usage for 20,675 miles (a typical year for me):

    Volt: 250.81 gallons
    C-Max: 311.05 gallons
    PIP: 333.20 gallons

    I am not sure that the C-Max will meet my cargo requirement, but it is the only one that stands a chance.

    One last thing for tonight. The 0-60 times for the three cars:

    PIP: 10.9 (http://www.zeroto60times.com)
    Volt: 8.9 (http://www.zeroto60times.com)
    C-Max: 8.4-8.7, Edmunds has the hybrid at 8.1, Ford has the C-Max Hybrid at 188 HP and the Energi at 188-195 HP, depending on the selected mode. Doing the mass to HP ratio gives me the estimated times.

    After looking at the numbers I am not sure way anybody would buy the PIP, except for the Toyota name. You would have to do a tremendous amount of long distance driving for the PIP to come out on top. The PIP is also really slow.

  • Modern Marvel Fan

    @CharlesF,

    Thanks for the number crunching. I agree with you with what you said. But We should give Credit to Ford for having a great entry to the hybrid market. Volt only seats 4. So if seating 5 is really important to you, then C-Max Energi will be more efficient than Prius Plugin in the first 90 miles or so…

    The C-Max Energi weight in at 3,800 lbs +. That is about 250 lbs heavier than the regular C-Max. I think that weight gain will slow the C-Max Energi down significantly. But it will be still better than Prius or Prius Plugin, but slower than Volt.

    Also, the article failed to mention this:

    2013 C-Max Energi gets

    108 MPGe rating for City,
    100 MPGe rating for combined,
    92 MPGe rating for highway.

    2013 Volt gets

    101 MPGe rating for City,
    98 MPGe rating for combined
    93 MPGe rating for highway

    So, the Volt is better for the Hwy and slightly worse for the combined…

  • Modern Marvel Fan

    Van wrote : “So how far can you drive on a tank of gas? 380 miles for the Volt, near 571 Miles for the Energi.”

    Really? A tank of gas? Is that even something anyone cares?

    Volt’s gas tank is about 9.3 gallon.
    C-Max gas tank is 14 gallons.

    So, bigger tank gives you more range, but you it is silly to have a large tank if Volt is designed to be EV first and hybrid second…

    The miles per tank is a stupid spec without tank size…

    Also since you listed this silly number,

    C-Max: 571 miles for 14 gallon = 40.78 miles per gallon.
    Volt : 380 miles for 9.3 gallon = 40.86 miles per gallon.

    40.86 > 40.78

    I guess Volt is even more efficient on “MPG” in this case… Not by much, but if you want to get “technical”.

  • usbseawolf2000

    Not sure what happened to my previous post. It disappeared.

    Just to be clear about Prius PHV’s pure EV range and MPGe rating. All Electric Range is 6 miles. However, the 95 MPGe applies to 11 miles.

    In simple term, Prius PHV completed the EPA city cycle in pure EV. During the highway cycle (about a third of the way), the gas engine kicked in due to high power demand and blended in 0.2 gallon of gas.

    The combination of both electricity and gasoline usage is rated at 95 MPGe. EPA did not separate the MPGe rating for the first 6 EV miles. If they did, it would get much higher than 95 MPGe because the best gas can get is 50 MPG (after engine warm up).

    Coming to C-Max Energi, it is possible that it completed both the City and Highway cycle without starting it’s gas engine. The MPGe numbers are very similar to the Leaf.

    Prius PHV battery can provide 50kW max. C-Max Energi battery can provide 68kW max. That and the EV top speed (62 vs 85 mph) may have made the difference.

  • drinnovation

    @Modern Marvel fan..

    Since you say “list the facts, please”, lets correct yours.

    Your statement “C-Max’s EV mode is NOT 19. PIP’s EV only mode is 6 miles rated by EPA. Volt is 38 miles. That is the major difference.” is at best misleading. The Plug in Prius uses .02 gallons of gas in during its charge depleting 11 EPA miles, and that is only because of the strong acceleration in on part of the test. The 95MPGe is measured over the 11 miles, which is what should be used for comparions. The 6 miles all electric is more a function of the test, and to use it without disclosing that is intentionally misleading.

    True there is just a little gas used, which is why I prefer my Volt, but the EV only range of a Pip is 11 if driven less aggressively or on just the city cycle. (Many people get 14EV in a Pip, then again a volt driven carefully can go much farther than EPA too — I averaged 50 miles per charge for almost all of the summer.

    I have yet to see an EPA EV range or CD estimate for the Energi. if it can do 85MPH in EV, it should be able to complete the tests in EV mode without ICE assist.

  • DrInnovation

    @VAN

    So how far can you drive on a tank of gas? 380 miles for the Volt, near 571 Miles for the Energi.

    My best tank on a volt is 4660 miles. I last put in gas in April, and before that October 2011…

    Its not the size, its what you do with it that matters.
    When one accounts for the utility factor of the larger EV range, the Volt may is still the most efficient. The Energi does a little better on EV, but only has about 52% the EV range (no EPA numbers yet using 20/38), so it will spend much more on gas bring the overall MPGe balance down.

    I do like the pricing of the Energi, while it compromises on range its less expensive and more range than a PiP.

  • CharlesF

    Comparing the PIP to Volt or the C-Max is fought with peril. The Volt and C-Max can run on their batteries during all of the EPA test. The PIP is not powerful enough to do that without using its ICE.

    So do you use the 6 mile figure or the 11 mile? My solution is to do the following: Use 25 miles, but add in 0.30 gallons of gasoline for those first 25 miles. This figure comes from the EPA. If you look up the PIP at http://www.fueleconomy.gov/ you will find “Fuel to Drive 25 Miles 3.2 kw-hrs of electricity and 0.3 gallons of gas”. If my calculation involves less than 25 miles, I will use 83 MPG for the PIP for the first 25 miles.

    I will be updating my calculations using this new method. I think this is a good compromise, and I hope others start to use it as well.

  • MS

    For any of these 3 cars, are there feedback on the lifetime of the batteries?

    I would expect that the battery when used as the main source of power to be replaced at a certain moment in time, and I think this should be part of the equation.

    But not sure about the lifetime of it in any of the models.

  • usbseawolf2000

    Actually, the electricity efficiency and the gas engine efficiency of Prius PHV 11 miles are displayed in the EPA label.

    Electric – 29 kWh per 100 miles
    Gas – 0.2 gallons per 100 miles

    That translates to 118 MPGe in electricity and 50 MPG in gasoline. Combine both and you get 95 MPGe.

    http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/64/Toyota_Prius_Plug-in_EPA_label.png

  • Van

    @DrInnovation, some folks like to stop at rest stops and fast food places to take a break rather than gas stations. So being able to drive 500 miles on a tank of gas is considered an asset.

    The range for the Ford C-Max hybrid is given at 571 miles, and its MPG is 47. So the Ford C-Max Energi, with the same size gas tank and the same MPG should travel near 571 miles, perhaps a little less due to weight or a little more due to EV range.

    The Volt is a great concept, and helped move the technology beyond full hybrids to plug-ins. I expect with the second generation battery and ICE, its price will drop and its fuel efficiency will improve. But I see no value in pretending the C-Max Energi does not eclipse Chevy’s initial effort.

  • bill cosworth

    People forget the volt has a larger battery so larger rebate.

    This car is nice but would not make sense for a lot of people .. For example in the state of MD…

    Volt cost $39,000-federal $7500 – MD rebate -2000= $29,500

    The Cmax car will not really perform well at highway speeds. The Volt has two motors and has to kick in another electric motor above 70MPH. The volt is designed to be a pure electric with no limitations. The Ford above 70 will be spinning the electric motor so fast it will eat the battery power very quickly also lose a lot of power. The 0-60 times in pure ev mode will be drastically reduced.

    Also for short commute the car will not get 47MPG it will get more like 20 MPG because it takes a wile for the engine to warm up and also in cold temp… issues

    So I can see the ford using a bunch of fuel in the length of the year and being temperamental to drive switching modes all the time.

    On paper is not always real experience. The volt is a pure EV from design and will be a no fuss.

    People also do more than just commute to work. It takes time to charge the battery….. after work errands , grocery store. 50% of my drive is after work.

    So overall expense of the ford is going to be much higher and the driver experience not as good.

  • bill cosworth

    People forget the volt has a larger battery so larger rebate.

    This car is nice but would not make sense for a lot of people .. For example in the state of MD…

    Volt cost $39,000-federal $7500 – MD rebate -2000= $29,500

    The Cmax car will not really perform well at highway speeds. The Volt has two motors and has to kick in another electric motor above 70MPH. The volt is designed to be a pure electric with no limitations. The Ford above 70 will be spinning the electric motor so fast it will eat the battery power very quickly also lose a lot of power. The 0-60 times in pure ev mode will be drastically reduced.

    Also for short commute the car will not get 47MPG it will get more like 20 MPG because it takes a wile for the engine to warm up and also in cold temp… issues

    So I can see the ford using a bunch of fuel in the length of the year and being temperamental to drive switching modes all the time.

    On paper is not always real experience. The volt is a pure EV from design and will be a no fuss.

    People also do more than just commute to work. It takes time to charge the battery….. after work errands , grocery store. 50% of my drive is after work.

    So overall expense of the ford is going to be much higher and the driver experience not as good.

  • Van

    @ Bill Cosworth, the C-Max Energi city mileage for short jaunts would be EV miles. Once the 15-20 miles of EV are used up, then it gets 47 MPG in city driving.

    Yes, the Volt Federal rebate is $7500, whereas the C-Max will be up to $3000. But still if you take $3000 from $33,000 you get $30,000 for the C-Max vice $40,000 minus $7500 you get $32500 for the Volt.

    Bottom line, for at least $2500 less, you get a bigger vehicle, with greater storage, larger rear seat room, higher range extender mileage, and a greater driving range per tank of gas. And it burns regular gas. So the higher gas prices go, the better the C-max looks.

  • Chuck in NJ……

    usbseawolf….thanks for clearing a few areas up for me….I stink at math big time….I am the proud owner of a PIP…Phev…Prius Plug in…..i looked at my sticker and YES I now see how the electric and gas figures are clearly stated….I just need you to explain HOW you get that the 118 MPGe in all electric and how combining Hybrid 50 MPG the EPA comes up with the combination of the 95 MPGe….? I must share though with each 10.6 gallons of gasoline I have driven over 2,000 miles and more with EACH FULL TANK ….been averaging over 250 MPGe…driving range is much much more if you use the Plug more than the Pump…I totally have saved over 24 gallons plus of gasoline with each tankful of 10.6 gallons….at the current gas prices its unreal how much I am saving MONTHLY….

    I find the Prius Plug in similar to my traded Prius Liftback 2010…except as Toyota states you now have an Xtended EV Range….its just that in itself that consumers must decide what their specific needs are as well as driving habits….I do VERY WELL and am COMPLETELY SATISFIED with my decesion to trade UP to the PHEV….I already enjoyed the 56 plus from my Prius Liftback so even at 95 I would be pleased….remember that the Hybrid Mode will beat the Volt and the 43 the CMax delivers……that is why I see my move to the PHEV Plug In as a wise choice…..Toyota WILL continue with its leading efficiency I am sure….thanks againand PLEASE explain the 118 figure for me…..Chuck in NJ…..

  • Bill coswirth

    The main problem is with the c-max you will use gas with a volt you will use none . That’s what people just don’t understand to use no gas is the best efficienty. The larger the ev range will ensure that. It’s that simple.

    Trust me the 2000 will go fast The average commute will exceed the range of the battery. So the volt hands down will save you the most money in the long run.

    The occasional long trip is just noise because you don’t take long trips every day.

  • Cindy f

    The problem I see with such a short ev range on cmax is the gas engine is sure to kick in thus a cold start condition. This will equate to a cold start with out a full warmup in many cases so your going to see poor millage unless you take it another 15- miles I have seen this in my volt where I go 5 miles after the ev depleted and it uses a ton of fuel. Once on a long trip it settles finally at 40 mpg but on average commutes the max can’t overcome the poor range.

  • Van

    Lets agree the average daily commute is under 35 miles. That may be made up of some folks traveling less than 20 miles per day, and others taking more than one trip of less than 15 miles. So certainly some folks would pile up more EV only miles in a Volt. However, about 1/3 of our miles are racked up driving more than 35 miles in a day. I drive about 200 miles a week, with about 100 being short jaunts, i.e. to the store or park or cafe, and another hundred by driving 50 miles one way, then fifty miles back.

    So for me, lets compare. in either the Volt or the Energi, I would get 100 miles of EV, plus 15 miles more at the start of my trip. Then I would burn 1.8 gallons of regular.

    Now in the Volt, I would get the same EV miles plus 35 more at the start of my trip. Then I would burn 1.75 gallons of premium. Now if a gallon of regular costs $3.60 I would spend 6.48 in the Energi, but would spend at $3.75 for premium 6.56.

    So I do burn a little more gas unless I plug in during my stay away, but not much, and I save money, and I go to the gas station less, and I drive a bigger car, and on and on.

  • Van

    Yes, one of the highest pollution and lowest gas mileage periods is a cold start. Without a plug in, you get a cold start nearly every time you take the car out of the garage. But most of those short jaunts in EV mode avoid that poor performance during warm-up. And even if I drive say 15 miles then stop, say for a movie, I only get one cold start not two. Thus Plug-ins provide more benefit in the pollution department than just fewer miles. Fewer cold starts!

  • Modern Marvel Fan

    @Van,

    Yes, there are situation where C-Max is a better fit. That is why I am glad that there are so many choices now for more consumers. In the end, I think both the Volt or the C-Max energi is WAY better than the Prius Plugin (unless you drive long trips all the time, in that case you are better off buying a regular Prius).

    But your math is kind of funny here. If you do a long trip of 100 miles, then C-Max Energi will give you 20 miles EV and 80 miles hybrid. @ 43mpg (energi), that is 1.86 gallon of gas. Volt would require 65 gas miles @ 37mpg, that is 1.76 gallon of premium gas. C-Max Energi cost ($6.70) vs. Volt cost ($6.60).

    Volt uses less gas and less in gas money. Sure, Volt will cost more to charge for those 35 miles vs. 20 miles. The difference is about 3 KWh. So, at $0.10/KWh, Volt will cost $0.30 more.

    The total cost for that 100 miles trip is now C-Max is cheaper by the price of 3KWh electricity – $0.10.

    If I use ” your figure” of 15 EV miles for C-Max Energi, the small margin will tilt toward Volt again.

    This basically shows that however you look at it, they are so close, it really comes down to your preference.

    C-Max Energi might be larger and more spacious, Volt is more fun to drive and you get to enjoy more “quiet” EV miles and use “Less GAS”.
    Also, Volt can use regular gas. Premium gas last longer in the tank vs. regular and it gives slightly better MPG.

  • Van

    Lets see:

    The article now says the C-max Energi gets 43, not 47. However, the bottom line remains the same.

    From 20 to 100 miles the Volt might be a tad cheaper to operate, but if the trips are less than 20 miles or more than 100 miles, then the C-Max Energi pulls way.

    For many people, the C-Max will be cheaper to buy, cheaper to operate, and more useful due to its size advantage.

  • Markw

    Once Ford sells the first 1000 get ready for the attacks. I predict it will be Reuters first in with an “ugly math” article announcing that the real cost to Ford to produce the C-Max is $500,000 a copy! ( ie 500 million R&D / this months sales = same math they used on the volt).

    Competition, Competition, Competition and ignore the tabloid press! That is the road to economic success!

  • usbseawolf2000

    @Chuck – Honda Fit EV happens to be rated 118 MPGe with 29kWh/100mile electricity consumption.

    http://www.fueleconomy.gov/feg/Find.do?action=sbs&id=33265

    For raw calculation for Prius PHV:

    1 gallon = 34.02 kWh per EPA

    Prius PHV electricity usage per 100 miles = 29kWh/34.02kWh = 0.852 gallon equivalent. 100 miles / 0.852 = 117.4 MPGe.

    To get the combined MPGe, we add the 0.2 gallon from actual gas + 0.852 gallon equivalent from electricity = 1.052 gallons total. 100 miles / 1.052 gallon(e) = 95 MPGe.

  • usbseawolf2000

    To those saying that Volt will use no gas…. EPA said on average (statistic predicts), 2013 Volt (38 miles EV range) will use gas on 34% of the miles. Older Volt with 35 miles EV range is 36%.

    There is electric miles and total miles counter of all Volts on GM Volt site. That real world data said 61% EV and 39% gas miles.

    Before anyone points out Voltstats.net, that site only has about 10% of all miles on GM site, last I checked.

  • Chuck in NJ……

    The Plug in Prius just needs to be charged more frequently than the Volt…u do not lose range if u plug the car in more often….Toyota created this vehicle with that in mind..u go much further in Hybrid mode …over 56 Mpg….i cannot feel comfortable minus the engine…the public is NOT READY for the ALL ELECTRIC vehicle YET…even with the back up on the Volt many consumers feel as I it still does not cut it with the larger battery..it allows the car too much weight which will kill your Hybrid mode of 37 vs. Prius if u need to its better than Volt at 56 plus….its also a big opinion decision….and each consumer thinks his own way….

  • Van

    Most expect Toyota will offer a larger battery in the future, something in the 8-10 Kwh range. But to avoid an increase in price, the second generation battery is needed. Lets say the PHV costs about $5000 more than a comparably equipped Prius. So the battery, plug and charger add way more than would be expected. Thus the battery price appears to be north of $1000 per kwh. If the price dropped to $125 per kwh, then the battery would only add about $1300 for 10 or so kwh.

    Bottom line, the Prius PHV is overpriced at $32,000 and would be competitive with the Ford Energi vehicles if the price drops below $30,000 and the EV range is increased to 20 miles plus.

  • Modern Marvel Fan

    seawolf wrote: “To those saying that Volt will use no gas…. EPA said on average (statistic predicts), 2013 Volt (38 miles EV range) will use gas on 34% of the miles. Older Volt with 35 miles EV range is 36%. “

    Well, that is the average. Many Volt do better and some do worse. I use 0 gallons during my daily commute. I am around 80% EV.

    @Chuck in NJ….

    you wrote: “even with the back up on the Volt many consumers feel as I it still does not cut it with the larger battery..it allows the car too much weight which will kill your Hybrid mode of 37 vs. Prius if u need to its better than Volt at 56 plus….”

    So, you are comparing the EPA of 37mpg with your so called “personal” MPG?

    Volt owners have known to get 45 EV miles and get 45 in MPG in extended range. Prius Plugin is rated 50MPG and only has 6 miles EV miles…

    So, unless you drive hundreds of miles per day, Volt is still cheaper to operate. C-Max Energi is also a better choice too.

    Also, care to explain why your Prius Plugin FAILED in crash test by losing 1 star from a 5-star rated Prius to a 4 star rated Prius Plugin? I guess 150 lbs battery “ruined” your safety cage?

  • Van

    So if we drive 1000 miles in a month, on average we will rack up 660 EV miles and 340 gas miles in a Volt. But many Volt owners say they burn no gas and go the the filling station less than once per two months. Are they exceptions, fugitives from the law of averages, or is the EPA fuzzy math? We know the EPA MPGe is a deliberate misrepresentation to make EV cars appear to do better than they do.

  • CharlesF

    @Van, I ran the numbers for my girl friend and came up with 15 gallons/month for 1562 miles/month for the Volt. Her current Gen II Prius uses about 34 gallons for the same trips. The company she works for has been putting in free chargers when people buy plug ins. If that happens at her building, her monthly usage drops to just over 10 gallons per month. That makes the Volt her lowest gasoline usage car with the exception of pure EVs (which would not work for her about 15 times a year). Using the same techniques including charging at work, for the PIP (10 EV miles and 50 MPG) and C-Max (20 EV miles and 42 MPG guesses) the PIP comes in at 19 gallons/month and the C-Max at 12.

    The C-Max has the most room (100/19/43, passenger, cargo, seats down cargo volume cubic feet), followed by the PIP (94/22/40) and the Volt (90/10/18) the least. My guess is that the C-Max will be the fastest based on power to weight ratios of the regular C-Max hybrid, with the Volt close behind and the PIP left for dead.

    For everybody I have run the numbers for, the Volt comes out using the least amount of gasoline of the 3 plug ins. The PIP always comes in last.

    It looks like the C-Max Energi should take sales from both the PIP and Volt, with the PIP being the main target. The C-Max has twice the all EV range of the PIP. The C-Max has a true all EV range. The C-Max has more passenger room and depending on if the back seats are up or down 3 CF more or less cargo space. The C-Max will be faster than the PIP. The C-Max costs less than the PIP. The PIP does have the best MPGs in hybrid mode, but you must drive it 78 miles before it beats the C-Max and 118 before it beats the Volt.

    Please note that we are guessing at the C-Max’s EV range and MPGs. For the above I used a 20 mile all EV range and 42 MPG. For the PIP, I used a 10 mile all EV range, which is a fiction, but it is fair.

  • Modern Marvel Fan

    Van wrote: “So if we drive 1000 miles in a month, on average we will rack up 660 EV miles and 340 gas miles in a Volt. But many Volt owners say they burn no gas and go the the filling station less than once per two months.”

    Well, you answered your own question with the word “AVERAGE”.
    If you pay a visit to the Volt stats. net you will see that many Volt owner rarely use any gas. Then there are also owners who don’t charge at all. Some of them are due to lack of charging facility (i.e. rental apt doesn’t allow it). Those who don’t charge at all is going to do drag out the average a lot just as those who charge a lot. It all depends on the miles.

    Currently, my Volt has about 6,000 mile and 35 gallon used.

  • usbseawolf2000

    @MMF: That’s much better. Volt owners do use gasoline. You use 20% of the miles and on average of all Volt owners, gas is used 39% of the time. It is good to brag about using no gas in certain situation but please do not mislead.

  • usbseawolf2000

    When Prius PHV use gas, it is 50 MPG (0.2 gal/100mi) and emissions are rated AT-PZEV. When it uses electricity, it is rated 117 MPGe (29kWh/100mi — more efficient than subcompact i-MIEV and ties with compact Fit EV). Combine both and it is rated 95 MPGe in a midsize with no range anxiety.

    95 MPGe only last for 11 miles so if you commute fits in that range, it’ll be perfect for you. If you can charge at work, 22 miles commute will work too. You still have the 50 MPG gas engine so going over 95 MPGe range will not drag it down as fast as other plugin hybrids.

    Tailpipe emission comparison of currently available plugin hybrids:
    http://priuschat.com/attachments/2012-plugin-hybrid-exhaust-png.34726/

  • usbseawolf2000

    Modern Marvel Fan wrote: “Currently, my Volt has about 6,000 mile and 35 gallon used.”

    How many kWh of electricity did your Volt consumed? Without that, it is impossible to calculate the MPGe you are getting.

  • usbseawolf2000

    On the topic of emission, EPA has a site that includes the tailpipe and upstream emission (fuel production for both gasoline and electricity) data on their Beyond Tailpipe Emission site.

    You can punch in your zip code and it’ll tell your greenhouse gas emission in your region and also the national average.

    Your regional emission from the zip code may vary but the national average for the Volt is 260 gram per mile. A regular Prius emits 222 g/mi while a Prius PHV emits 210 g/mi. That includes everything from drilling oil, refining, transporting, cold engine start emission, etc… You name it. The same goes for electricity.

    http://www.fueleconomy.gov/feg/Find.do?action=bt2